Boston Public Radio Podcast

WGBH Educational Foundation

About

Join hosts Jim Braude and Margery Eagan for a smart local conversation with leaders and thinkers shaping Boston and New England. We feature our favorite conversation from each show. To hear the full show, please visit wgbhnews.org/bpr To share your opinion, email bpr@wgbh.org or call 877-301-8970 during the live broadcast from 11AM-2PM.

Available on

Community

1494 episodes

BPR Full Show: An "Ask The" Double Hitter

Today on : GOV. CHARLIE BAKER joined the show for our regular "Ask The Governor" segment where listeners' questions focused on the impending MBTA shutdown and what could be done about the region's spiraling housing costs. Baker is the governor of Massachusetts. ANDREA CABRAL shared her insights on the various legal investigations into President Donald Trump and associates, plus Massachusetts’ dropping prison population, the case of the Florida judge who ruled a 16-year-old was too young to decide to get an abortion and the Rhode Island radio host arrested on livestream while taking justice into his own hands. Cabral is the former Suffolk County sheriff and secretary of public safety, and former CEO of the cannabis company Ascend. MAYOR MICHELLE WU joined the show for our regular "Ask The Mayor" segment to talk about the growing problem of online and offline harassment, including that faced by doctors at Boston Children's Hospital and by women elected to public office. Listeners dialed in with questions about the MBTA shutdown and workarounds for getting around and updates on Boston Public Schools.

2h 50m
Aug 19
BPR Full Show: Heat Pumps

Today on : We begin the show by asking listeners about Boston's proposal to ban the use of fossil fuels in new buildings. Medical ethicist Art Caplan discusses the Inflation Reduction Act's expansion of Medicare's ability to cap prescription drug prices and the growing popularity of ayahuasca and psychedelic use among celebrities. Caplan is the Drs. William F. and Virginia Connolly Mitty Professor and founding head of the Division of Medical Ethics at NYU School of Medicine in New York City. National security expert Juliette Kayyem discusses her latest piece in The Atlantic on the importance of the documents from the FBI search of former president Donald Trump's Mar-a-Lago estate, Wyoming Congresswoman Liz Cheney's election loss and recent right-wing targeting and harassment of Boston Children's Hospital's trans health program. Kayyem was the assistant secretary for intergovernmental affairs for Homeland Security under former President Barack Obama. She is currently the faculty chair of the Homeland Security and Security and Global Health Projects at Harvard’s Kennedy School of Government. Comedian Tom Papa discusses his current projects and his upcoming Netflix standup comedy special taping at The Wilbur theatre this fall. Papa hosts the Sirius XM Radio show 'Come to Papa' and starred in the 2020 Netflix special 'You're Doing Great!' Boston Globe correspondent Kara Baskin discusses some of her latest parenting columns, including a list of her favorite restaurants to dine out with children and tips for how to stop exploding at your kids. Baskin is a food and parenting writer for the Boston Globe, and a humor writer for McSweeney's. Naturalist, author and BPR contributor Sy Montgomery discusses how squirrels have been keeping cool in the recent heat waves by splooting. She also discusses new science recording stingrays making sounds for the first time. Montgomery is a journalist, naturalist and BPR contributor. Her latest book is "The Hawk’s Way: Encounters with Fierce Beauty.” We close the show by asking listeners about their stories –both nightmarish and idyllic – about taking their kids out to restaurants.

2h 44m
Aug 17
BPR Full Show: Orange Line Woes

Today on : We begin the show by asking listeners about the impending shutdown of the MBTA’s Orange Line. Trenni Kusinerick talks about Bill Belichick’s efforts to rebuild the Patriot’s offense, the state of the Red Sox this season, and 8-year-old twins whose father is looking for them to get the youngest possible sponsorship by the NBA. Kusnierek is a reporter and anchor for NBC Sports Boston, and a weekly Boston Public Radio contributor. Michael Curry breaks down new Massachusetts legislation concerning mental health reform, the manipulative advertising of anti-abortion pregnancy centers, a recent investigation into complaints about healthcare equity in an East Boston Neighborhood Health Center, and the recent appointment of Boston Police Comissioner Michael Cox. Curry is chair of the NAACP Advocacy and Policy Committee, and is president and CEO of the Massachusetts League of Community Health Centers. Jo Sias shares her expertise on the state of infrastructure in the face of our changing climate and extreme heat, including how climate-resilient infrastructure is more worthwhile in the long run, how politicians have tried to avoid implementing it, and why she’s optimistic for the future. Sias is a professor in the civil and environmental engineering department at University of New Hampshire, and directs the UNH Center for Infrastructure Resilience to Climate. Jared Bowen gives us the latest on the Greater Boston art scene, including the Armenian Museum of America’s exhibit “On the Edge: Los Angeles Art,” Jordan Nassar’s “Fantasy and Truth” at the ICA, MASS MoCA employees' unionization efforts , and the Pentagon’s involvement in the making of “Top Gun: Maverick.” Bowen is GBH’s executive arts editor and the host of Open Studio. John King discusses the Inflation Reduction Act and whether the tide is turning for Democrats ahead of the midterm elections, including what to look for in this week’s primaries in Wyoming and Alaska, and the fallout from the FBI raid on former President Donald Trump’s Mar-a-Lago home. King is CNN's chief national correspondent and anchor of "Inside Politics,” which airs weekdays and Sunday mornings at 8 a.m. We end the show by asking listeners if, like Rep. Liz Cheney, they would stand up for the truth even if they knew it would cost them.

2h 41m
Aug 17
BPR Full Show: Five Second Rule

Today on : We began the show by asking listeners about the normalization of political violence in our culture. Shirley Leung discusses her reporting on the humanitarian crisis stemming from a lack of affordable housing in Massachusetts, and shared her thoughts on Boston Mayor Michelle Wu’s relationship with real estate developers. Leung is a business columnist for the Boston Globe. Arthur C. Brooks breaks down his latest columns about happiness, including how to embrace doing nothing, how to be happy in a recession and how to get out of your head by getting outside. Brooks is the William Henry Bloomberg professor of the practice of public leadership at the Harvard Kennedy School, a professor of management practice at the Harvard Business School, the happiness correspondent at The Atlantic and host of the podcast series “How to Build a Happy Life.” Corby Kummer talks about the recent interest in Italian beef thanks to “The Bear,” calls for Congress to address meat’s large carbon footprint and unionization efforts at Trader Joe’s and Starbucks. Kummer is executive director of the food and society policy program at the Aspen Institute, a senior editor at The Atlantic and a senior lecturer at the Tufts Friedman School of Nutrition Science and Policy. Revs. Irene Monroe and Emmett Price III share their thoughts on Pope Francis meeting with transgender guests of a Roman church, the Department of Justice investigating sexual abuse in the Southern Baptist Church and prosecuting local white supremacist groups. Monroe is a syndicated religion columnist and the Boston voice for Detour’s African American Heritage Trail. Price is founding pastor of Community of Love Christian Fellowship in Allston and the inaugural dean of Africana Studies at Berklee College of Music. Together, they host GBH’s All Rev’d Up podcast. Lewis Black talks about the ethos of his rant-comedy style, how the state of America has inspired his tour and what people are ranting about today. Black is a comedian who will perform at the Lowell Auditorium Sept. 16 as part of his “Off The Rails” tour. We end the show by asking listeners what they think about the five-second rule.

2h 41m
Aug 16
Corby Kummer: Trader Joe's unions could signal the future for grocery store organizing

In July, workers at a Trader Joe’s in Hadley, Mass. successfully voted to unionize https://www.wgbh.org/news/local-news/2022/07/28/trader-joes-employees-in-hadley-vote-to-unionize, making their location the first unionized Trader Joe’s in the country. Last week, a second Trader Joe’s in Minneapolis https://www.nytimes.com/2022/08/12/business/economy/union-vote-trader-joes.html followed suit. The union successes come in a wave of union victories across the country, including at Starbucks and Amazon—currently, employees at a unionized Starbucks near Boston University have been on strike for nearly 30 days https://www.bostonglobe.com/2022/08/15/business/12-hours-picket-line-starbucks/.  “I think that it's no accident that places and businesses that made part of their brand identity treating their workers well and enjoying their workers are the ones who were being targeted because these workers got used to being treated much better than others,” food writer Corby Kummer said on Monday. Kummer added that COVID-19 and the political climate are factors in recent unionization efforts. Some companies cut benefits at the start of the pandemic, and now workers have to fight to bring them back. “So many places—meaning employers—have been much more lax and financially strapped because of the pandemic and treating their employees worse,” he said. “And also, unions are more fashionable, they've come back into popularity and worker's consciousness in a way they haven't in decades.” Kummer said that unionization efforts at stores like Trader Joe’s are more challenging than at Starbucks, because grocery stores have more employees. Still, he believes the future of Trader Joe’s unions could signal the future of grocery store unions more broadly. “I think that Trader Joe's is an important bellwether for the future, and I'm proud of Massachusetts for being the first one,” he said.

20m
Aug 15
BPR Full Show: A Tax-Free Weekend for a Taxing Week

Today on  Senator Elizabeth Warren talks about the MBTA, and the FBI raid on Mar-a-Lago, and took listener calls and questions on an installment of “Ask the Senator.” Retired Judge Nancy Gertner shares her thoughts on Attorney General Merrick Garland’s address on the FBI raid at Mar-a-Lago, unpacking some of the legal statutes involved in the situation. She also discussed why it’s important to our democracy to be able to trust judges, and more. Gertner is a retired federal judge and a senior lecturer at Harvard Law School. Jared Bowen talks about the latest in arts: the Met’s new exhibit “Chroma: Ancient Sculpture in Color;” Now and There’s new exhibit in front of Faneuil Hall, called “Summer Sets,” Patrick Kelly’s “Runway of Love” at the PEM, and BJ Novak’s “Vengeance;” and Leslie Dill’s new exhibition “Wilderness” at the MFA. Bowen is GBH’s executive arts editor and the host of Open Studio. Patty Bourrée explains the impact of Boston’s Drag Queen Story Hour, and how recent white supremacist protests at the events have affected him. Patty Bourrée heads Boston’s Branch of Drag Queen Story Hour. Brian O’Donovan and the Neave Trio join us ahead of their performance at the Rockport Celtic Festival to share a bit about their group and play a few songs. O’Donovan hosts GBH’s A Celtic Sojourn. The Neave trio members are violinist Anna Williams, pianist Eri Nakamura, and cellist Mikhail Veselov. We end the show by asking listeners what they think about sales tax weekend.

2h 42m
Aug 12
BPR Full Show: All That and a Bag of CHIPS

Today on : Andrea Mitchell updates us on the latest national political headlines. Mitchell is the NBC News Chief Washington Correspondent. She is also Chief Foreign Affairs Correspondent, and anchor of “Andrea Mitchell Reports,” which airs weekdays at noon on MSNBC. Then, we open the phone lines to listeners, asking if they would consider getting rid of their manicured lawns in favor of something more natural. Andrea Cabral discusses the FBI’s search of Mar-a-Lago for classified documents. Cabral is the former Suffolk County sheriff and secretary of public safety, and former CEO of the cannabis company Ascend. Tess Gerritsen and Josh Gerritsen shares the history of humans’ complicated relationship with pigs, as told through their documentary, “Magnificent Beasts.” Gerritsen is a Maine-based author. Her and her son Josh are the filmmakers behind the new documentary, “Magnificent Beasts.” Paul Reville talks about declining school enrollment at both the high school and college levels. Reville is the former secretary of education and a professor at Harvard University’s Graduate School of Education, where he also runs the Education Redesign Lab. His latest book, co-authored with Lynne Sacks, is “Collaborative Action for Equity and Opportunity: A Practical Guide for School and Community Leaders.” Jon Gruber explains the economics behind the CHIPS and Science Act. Gruber is the Ford Professor of Economics at MIT. He was instrumental in creating both the Massachusetts health-care reform and the Affordable Care Act – and now can add the CHIPS Act to his resume. His latest book is “Jump-Starting America: How Breakthrough Science Can Revive Economic Growth and the American Dream.” We end the show by talking with listeners about harnessing feelings of envy for motivation.

2h 41m
Aug 11
Corby Kummer: Much Ado About Cracker Barrel

Award-winning food writer Corby Kummer joined to share his thoughts on Hulu’s “The Bear,” Cracker Barrel adding vegan sausages to their menu, and more.

20m
Aug 10
BPR Full Show: The Walmart of Weed

Today on : We begin the show by opening phone lines, asking listeners for their thoughts on the FBI’s raid of Mar-a-Lago. Art Caplan talks about the accessibility issues wheelchair users face while traveling by plane, and weighs in on the resurrection of extinct animals. Caplan is the Drs. William F. and Virginia Connolly Mitty Professor and founding head of the Division of Medical Ethics at NYU School of Medicine in New York City. Juliette Kayyem discusses the FBI’s raid of former President Donald Trump’s home of Mar-a-Lago. Kayyem is former assistant secretary for homeland security under President Barack Obama, and the faculty chair of the homeland security program at Harvard’s Kennedy School of Government. Sarah Larson shares her thoughts on the rise of pickleball in America, and the sport’s potential to bridge the political divide. Larson is a staff writer for the New Yorker. Will Sennott discusses the foreign private equity firms dominating New England’s fishing industry. Sennott is a reporter for the New Bedford Light. Dan Adams updates us on cannabis reforms in Mass., and Maine’s booming medical marijuana industry. Adams is the Boston Globe cannabis reporter, and author of “This Week In Weed,” the definitive marijuana newsletter.  We end the show by talking with listeners about the potential disappearance of summer food staples – like lobsters, blueberries, and corn – with climate change.

2h 41m
Aug 10
BPR Full Show: The FBI's Raid on Mar-a-Lago, and more

Today on : Judge Nancy Gertner shares her take on the FBI raiding former President Donald Trump’s home, explaining the legal conditions under which a raid like this could take place, and what kind of consequences could come from it. Gertner is a retired federal judge and a senior lecturer at Harvard Law School. Trenni Kusnierek discusses Serena Williams’ retirement, Tom Brady’s tampering scandal, Aaron Rodgers’ recent podcast conversation about his experience with ayahuasca and Brittney Griner’s chances of coming home. Kusnierek is a reporter and anchor for NBC Sports Boston, and a weekly Boston Public Radio contributor. Chris Burrell shares insights from his investigative reporting on the inaccessibility of Massachusetts' beaches. Burrell is an investigative reporter for GBH News. The second story in his series “Barriers at the Beach” is out now. https://www.wgbh.org/news/local-news/2022/07/25/barriers-at-the-beach-people-tussle-over-scarce-access-as-sea-levels-and-property-values-rise Then, we take listener calls about their experiences accessing the state's beaches. Corby Kummer talks about what the popularity of Hulu series "The Bear" says about the restaurant industry, responses to Cracker Barrel including a new Impossible Burger on their menu, the carbon dioxide shortage that is hampering the production of beer, and how inflation has made it necessary for more middle-class people to use food banks. Kummer is executive director of the food and society policy program at the Aspen Institute, a senior editor at The Atlantic and a senior lecturer at the Tufts Friedman School of Nutrition Science and Policy. Sean Ellis and Victor Rosario share their experiences being wrongfully convicted and reentering society — including the stark lack of resources for exonerees — and the way that their work helps to try and help smooth the process of reentering society. Ellis and Rosario are a part of the Exoneree Network of the New England Innocence Project, which provides support and empowerment for people who were released from prison after having served time for wrongful convictions. John King discusses the FBI raid on former President Trump’s home Mar-a-Lago, including his thoughts on whether the news helps or hinders Democrats ahead of the midterms. King is CNN's Chief National Correspondent and anchor of "Inside Politics,” which airs weekdays and Sunday mornings at 8 a.m. We end the show by asking listeners what the FBI would find if the agency raided their homes.

2h 41m
Aug 09
BPR Full Show: Yet Another Heat Wave

Today on : EJ Dionne discusses the Inflation Reduction Act’s potential impact on climate, as well as what its passage says about polarization in America, and the ability of Democrats in Congress to get things done ahead of the midterms. Dionne is a senior fellow at The Brookings Institution. His latest book is “Code Red: How Progressives and Moderates Can Unite to Save Our Country.” Then, we ask listeners about what the Inflation Reduction Act’s passage says about polarization in Congress. Brian McGrory discuss the impacts of the recent MBTA closures, Mayor Michelle Wu’s strategy in dealing with developers in the city, and the potential for a 2024 Trump or Biden presidential run. McGrory is the editor-in-chief of the Boston Globe. Bruce Marks talks about the work NACA is doing to help Americans afford homes, and explains the factors which are driving the housing crisis across the country. Marks is the CEO and founder of NACA, the nation’s largest Housing and Urban Development-certified nonprofit. Revs. Irene Monroe and Emmett Price III share their thoughts on the NFL’s controversial record with player activism and supporting women, as well as recent calls for the church community to confront its ableism, and considerations about changing the Mass. state seal. Monroe is a syndicated religion columnist and the Boston voice for Detour’s African American Heritage Trail. Price is founding pastor of Community of Love Christian Fellowship in Allston, and the inaugural dean of Africana Studies at Berklee College of Music. Together, they host GBH's “All Rev’d Up” podcast. Ayo Edebiri talks about her upbringing in Boston, her role in Hulu’s “The Bear,” and her upcoming projects. Edebiri is a comedian, writer, producer and actress. She plays Sydney in “The Bear,” and Missy in the Netflix series “Big Mouth.” We end the show by asking listeners how they’re holding up through this summer’s heat waves.

2h 41m
Aug 08
BPR Full Show: Give me hot dogs or give me death

Today on : We begin the show by asking listeners how they find idle time to relax. Michael Curry weighs in on the U.S. response to monkeypox, and U.S. Attorney Rachael Rollins’ new hate-crime hotline. Curry is chair of the NAACP Advocacy and Policy Committee, and is president and CEO of the Mass. League of Community Health Centers. Kevin and Michael Bacon preview their latest music together, and discussed their tour across New England. Michael is an Emmy Award-winning film and television composer. Kevin is an actor – currently starring in Showtime’s “City on a Hill” and the new thriller “They/Them.” Together they form the “Bacon Brothers” musical duo. Irene Li discuss BIPOC women in the farmer’s market scene, and the state of the restaurant industry. Li is a James Beard Award-winning chef and owner of Mei Mei Dumplings.  Shirley Leung updates listeners on the state of the MBTA, with the upcoming Orange Line shutdown and continued slew of dangerous incidents. Leung is a business columnist for the Boston Globe. Brad Vernatter, Omar Najmi and Mack Wolz perform a few songs, and discuss their upcoming performances of “Romeo and Juliet” on the Common with the Boston Lyric Opera. Vernatter is artistic and general director for the BLO. Najmi and Wolz are performers with the BLO. They were accompanied on piano by Douglas Sumi.  We end the show by discussing recent studies showing the harmful effects of unhealthy food.

2h 44m
Aug 05
BPR Full Show: Hot Coffee for Hot Weather

Today on  Chuck Todd talks about Sen. Joe Manchin’s role as the 50th vote in the Senate, the impact of Kansans voting to retain their abortion rights, and the possibility of a red wave in the midterms. Todd is the moderator of “Meet The Press” on NBC, host of “Meet The Press Daily” on MSNBC and the political director for NBC News. Then, we ask listeners if they think the MBTA’s Orange Line shutdown will be worth the hassle. Andrea Cabral discusses the latest headlines from the ongoing Alex Jones trial for spreading misinformation about the Sandy Hook mass shooting. Cabral is the former Suffolk County sheriff and secretary of public safety, and former CEO of the cannabis company Ascend. Then we open the phone lines to let listeners lead the conversation, sharing the stories they can’t stop thinking about. David Abel shares his thoughts on potential climate legislation in Congress, how the current drought is impacting the Charles River, and how climate change is affecting Maine’s puffin population. Abel is a Pulitzer Prize–winning writer who covers the environment for the Boston Globe. Andy Ihnatko weighs in on the new CHIPS+ act, which incentivizes United States' companies to manufacture their own semiconductors, a recent controversy surrounding video footage from Ring doorbells, and the resurgence of Google Glass. Ihnatko is a tech writer and blogger, posting at Ihnatko.com http://ihnatko.com/. We end the show by asking listeners whether they prefer iced or hot coffee in the summertime.

2h 44m
Aug 04
BPR Full Show: Rats!

Today on : We begin the show by talking with listeners about Kansas voters deciding to protect abortion rights in their state in the face of a potential abortion ban. Art Caplan talks about TV personality and Pennsylvania senate candidate Dr. Mehmet Oz’s history of dubious medical claims, and President Joe Biden’s COVID-19 rebound case. Caplan is the Drs. William F and Virginia Connolly Mitty Professor and founding head of the Division of Medical Ethics at NYU School of Medicine in New York City. Juliette Kayyem discusses recent catastrophic flooding in Kentucky, and the state of abortion rights in Republican-dominated states. Kayyem is the former assistant secretary for homeland security under President Barack Obama, and the faculty chair of the homeland-security program at Harvard’s Kennedy School of Government. Her most recent book is “The Devil Never Sleeps: Learning to Live in an Age of Disasters.” Lyndia Downie updates us on the state of homelessness in Boston, following record heat in the area. Downie is the president and executive director of the Pine Street Inn. Rick Steves shares travel tips and tricks from his most recent tour through Europe. Steves is an author, television and radio host, and the owner of “Rick Steves’ Europe” tour group. You can catch “Rick Steves’ Europe” weeknights at 7:30 p.m. on GBH 2, and his radio show “Travel With Rick Steves” on Sundays at 4 p.m. on GBH 89.7. His latest, the six-hour mini-series “Rick Steves Art of Europe,” will be available to stream to GBH members starting in October. Meredith Goldstein talks about her latest “Love Letters” columns offering love and relationship advice. Goldstein is a features writer for the Boston Globe, where she authors the “Love Letters” column, and hosts the “Love Letters” podcast. We end the show by asking listeners for their thoughts on Boston’s booming rat population.

2h 41m
Aug 03
BPR Full Show: All things pickles

Today on : We begin the show by asking listeners if they’re boycotting the NFL following the recent sexual harassment allegations against Deshaun Watson.  Trenni Kusnierek discusses the recent allegations against Watson, the underdog victory for England Women’s soccer in the 2022 Euro Championships and death of a hiker on Mt. Washington. Kusnierek is a reporter and anchor for NBC Sports Boston, and a weekly contributor. Carol Rose talks about how state legislatures have been reacting in the wake of Republican challenges to mail-in voting laws, and the recent passage of the CROWN act in Mass., which prohibits discrimination based on hair-type. Rose is the executive director of the ACLU of Massachusetts. Lee Pelton reflects on the life and legacy of Bill Russell, Boston’s recent rank as the 2nd least affordable in the U.S. and a recent Harvard study which ties upward mobility to having wealthy friends. Pelton is the president and CEO of The Boston Foundation. Chris Muther recaps his recent piece on a five-star hotel in Hyannis, and discusses the guilt Americans feel taking vacations, the “lost luggage epidemic” and a popular new trend: the coastal grandmother aesthetic. Muther is a travel writer for the Boston Globe. Jared Bowen talks about Shakespeare on the Common, Brad Pitt in his new movie “Bullet Train,” a new play at the Company One Theater, and Grand Horizons at the Gloucester Stage. ​​Bowen is GBH’s executive arts editor and the host of Open Studio. We end the show by asking listeners to share their feelings about the current pickle craze.

2h 44m
Aug 02
BPR Full Show: Remembering the Life of Bill Russell

Today on Attorney General Maura Healey shares her thoughts on the outcomes of the recent state legislature session, and took listener calls and answered questions on another installment of “Ask the AG.” Howard Bryant discusses the life and legacy of Bill Russell, including the impact of his presence in Boston and his role as a social justice advocate during the Civil Rights movement. Bryant is a columnist and commentator for ESPN. Then, we ask listeners about their memories of Bill Russell. Katie Krall talks about her experience being a female coach in the MLB, the unorthodox career path that led her to work in baseball, and the culture around women’s sports today. Krall is a player development coach for the Portland Sea Dogs, a Boston Red Sox affiliate team. Revs. Irene Monroe and Emmett Price discuss the Kansas nuns opposing a state abortion amendment, the Pope Francis’ recent ‘apology tour’ in Canada, and Beyonce’s new album. Monroe is a syndicated religion columnist and the Boston voice for Detour’s African American Heritage Trail. Price is founding pastor of Community of Love Christian Fellowship in Allston and the Inaugural Dean of Africana Studies at Berklee College of Music. Together, they host GBH's All Rev’d Up podcast. Richard Blanco reads poems about the chaos in our country right now, including “Fire and Ice https://www.poetryfoundation.org/poems/44263/fire-and-ice” by Robert Frost, Anna Akhmatova’s “Lot’s Wife https://poets.org/poem/lots-wife,” and his own “And So We All Fall Down https://www.nytimes.com/2021/05/20/magazine/poem-and-so-we-all-fall-down.html”. Blanco is the fifth inaugural poet in United States history. His latest book, "How To Love A Country," deals with various sociopolitical issues that shadow America. We end the show by talking about recent legislation in the statehouse.

2h 41m
Aug 01
BPR Full Show: "Ask the Mayor," Cambridge Jazz Festival, and more

Today on : Mayor Michelle Wu discusses her administration’s strategy to combat climate change, as well as the rise of extremism in Boston, and the city’s new Police Commissioner Michael Cox. She also answers listeners’ questions during “Ask the Mayor.” Callie Crossley talks about teen activist Olivia Julianna’s abortion fundraising off of Rep. Matt Gaetz’s insulting her appearance, school segregation in the U.S., and National Chicken Wing Day. Crossley hosts GBH’s Under the Radar and Basic Black. Charlie Sennott shares his thoughts on the latest from the war in Ukraine, Speaker of the House Nancy Pelosi’s potential trip to Taiwan, and the U.S. strategy to get WNBA player Brittney Griner back from Russia. Sennott is a news analyst for GBH and the founder of the GroundTruth Project. Sue O'Connell reacts to Gov. Charlie Baker signing a bill to protect abortion, Verizon deciding to drop One American News (OAN), and Republicans’ hypocrisy concerning the same-sex marriage vote. O’Connell is the co-publisher of Bay Windows and South End News, and contributor to Current, on NBC L-X and NECN. Ron Savage and Larry Ward from the Cambridge Jazz Foundation talk about their work and the process of putting on the Cambridge Jazz Festival, and played some music. Ward is the executive producer of the Cambridge Jazz foundation. Savage is the Dean of the Professional Performance Division at the Berkeley College of music and the artistic director of Cambridge Jazz foundation. We end the show by asking listeners if they avoid working on Fridays.

2h 42m
Jul 29
BPR Full Show: Born to Run

Today on : Chuck Todd updates listeners on the latest political headlines, including the DOJ’s investigation into former President Donald Trump, and Senator Joe Manchin’s long-awaited compromise on an energy bill. Todd is the moderator of “Meet The Press” on NBC, host of “Meet The Press Daily” on MSNBC and the political director for NBC News. Then, we ask listeners their thoughts on Manchin’s deal. Andrea Cabral discusses a trade proposal for Brittney Griner, the basketball player detained in Russia, and Alex Jones’ trial for spreading misinformation about Sandy Hook. Cabral is the former Suffolk County sheriff and secretary of public safety, and former CEO of the cannabis company Ascend. Ben Shattuck previews his latest book, and discusses the life and legacy of Henry David Thoreau. Shattuck is a painter, co-owner of Davoll’s General Store in Dartmouth, and the author of “Six Walks: In the Footsteps of Henry David Thoreau.” Shirley Leung talks about politicians joining Starbucks picket lines, and drama around the future of Gunstock Mountain Resort in New Hampshire. Leung is a business columnist for the Boston Globe. James Bennett II previews the latest news in arts and culture, including favorites from Newport Jazz Festival and controversy over high ticket prices for Bruce Springsteen tickets. Bennett II is GBH’s arts and culture reporter. We end the show by discussing the prices for Bruce Springsteen tickets and the high prices of live events.

2h 44m
Jul 28
BPR Full Show: An ode to ice cream trucks

Today on : Art Caplan discusses President Joe Biden’s COVID-19 diagnosis and the World Health Organization declaring a global health emergency over monkeypox. Caplan is the Drs. William F. and Virginia Connolly Mitty Professor and founding head of the Division of Medical Ethics at NYU School of Medicine in New York City. Then, we ask listeners whether or not they struggle to get enough sleep. Jon Gruber explains the connection between extreme heat, climate change and economics. Gruber is the Ford Professor of Economics at MIT. His latest book is “Jump-Starting America: How Breakthrough Science Can Revive Economic Growth and the American Dream.” Emily Worden updates listeners on the state of the job industry, and shares career advice with callers. Worden is a career coach and adjunct professor at Boston University, where she teaches Career Development in the Arts. Kate Dineen tells her story of traveling out of state to receive a late term abortion, and Rebecca Hart Holder explains the state of abortion legislation in Massachusetts following the Supreme Court overturning Dineen is the Executive Vice President of A Better City. Hart Holder is Executive Director for Reproductive Equity Now. Megan Sandberg-Zakain and Rachael Warren preview their summer adaptation of William Shakespeare’s “Much Ado About Nothing” on Boston Common. Sandberg-Zakian is director of Commonwealth Shakespeare Company’s rendition of Much Ado About Nothing. Warren plays Beatrice. We end the show by discussing the joys of ice cream trucks in the summer.

2h 44m
Jul 27
BPR Full Show: Choco Tacos

Today on : We begin the show by talking with listeners about their MBTA woes. Trenni Kusnierek talks about the possibility of Kevin Durant coming to the Celtics, Lebron James’ comments about racism in Boston sports, and the latest in the running world and the state of the Red Sox. Kusnierek is a reporter and anchor for NBC Sports Boston, and a weekly  contributor. Joan Donovan discusses her team’s research affirming former President Donald Trump’s role in the events of Jan. 6, including the new role of social media in inciting political violence. Donovan is the research director of Harvard Kennedy School’s Shorenstein Center on Media, Politics and Public Policy where she examines internet and technology studies, online extremism, media manipulation and disinformation campaigns. Judge Nancy Gertner shares her thoughts on the possibility of Trump being criminally charged based on the findings of the Jan. 6 committee. Gertner is a retired federal judge and a senior lecturer at Harvard Law School. Corby Kummer debates the merits of bringing back happy hour in Massachusetts, discusses the end of the Choco Taco, and explains why “50 Best Restaurants in the World” lists are problematic. Kummer is executive director of the food and society policy program at the Aspen Institute, a senior editor at The Atlantic and a senior lecturer at the Tufts Friedman School of Nutrition Science and Policy. John King talks about the possibility of the U.S. Supreme Court repealing the right to contraception following the Dobbs v. Jackson Women’s Health Organization ruling, what to expect from the Jan. 6 hearings and President Joe Biden’s plans to combat climate change. King is CNN's Chief National Correspondent and anchor of "Inside Politics,” which airs weekdays and Sunday mornings at 8 a.m. We end the show by asking listeners what their comfort shows are.

2h 41m
Jul 26
“Go out and buy a Drumstick”: Why food writer Corby Kummer isn’t mourning the death of the Choco Taco

To borrow the famous sentiment from songwriter Joni Mitchell, “you don’t know what you’ve got ’til it’s gone.” This week, ice cream manufacturer Klondike announced the discontinuation of their popular taco-shaped ice cream snack the Choco Taco. Choco Tacos have been around since the 80’s, and news of the snack’s demise was widely lamented across the internet. Speaking Tuesday on , food writer Corby Kummer called the Klondike brand “wonderful,” “nostalgic,” and “iconic,” noting the Choco Taco’s unique appeal in the landscape of novelty ice cream. “[Klondike] had a very clever idea, which is to package in a taco shape, vanilla ice cream with chocolate covered so-called taco shell – and then, nuts that go all around the semi-circle of the taco… that means you can mix the chocolate and nuts and the wafer more in every bite, ‘cause it’s more distributed when you just think of the shape,” Kummer said. For those upset about the news, he added that Klondike already offers several similar alternatives to the taco-shaped treat. “Go out and buy a Drumstick,” Kummer said. “It’s the same ingredients in a different shape and you’ll still be a happy ice cream fan.” For fans discouraged by Klondike’s decision, he added that there are several other ice cream brands offering similar products. "You can boycott Klondike and go for rival products that have the same ingredients in them,” he joked.

24m
Jul 26
BPR Full Show: "Ask the Doctor," road trips, and more

Today on : We begin the show by asking listeners if they support the proposed return of happy hour in Mass. Michael Curry talks about recent white supremacist activity in Boston and the racial discrepancies in Mass. healthcare surrounding abortion and COVID-19. Curry is chair of the NAACP Advocacy and Policy Committee, and is president and CEO of the Mass. League of Community Health Centers. Mona Haydar and Sebastian Robins reflect on their experience road tripping across Route 66, including the communities they met, the history they encountered, and how their upbringings and backgrounds as Muslim Americans influence their perspectives and storytelling. Haydar is a rapper, poet, activist and chaplain. Robins is an educator and chaplain. Together, they host the PBS series "The Great Muslim American Road Trip." Jimmy Liang discusses his journey from being brought up by a food-loving family to owning the largest Asian food group in Mass., what it takes to design a restaurant today, and how the food culture in Boston and its surrounding cities is changing. Liang is the founder, CEO, and chef of the JP Fuji group. Revs. Irene Monroe and Emmett Price talks about a recent incident involving a Sesame Place character’s racist behavior toward children and the city’s response to recent white supremacist activity in Boston. Monroe is a syndicated religion columnist and the Boston voice for Detour’s African American Heritage Trail. Price is founding pastor of Community of Love Christian Fellowship in Allston and the Inaugural Dean of Africana Studies at Berklee College of Music. Together, they host GBH's All Rev’d Up podcast. Dr. Katherine Gergen-Barnett discusses the newest variant of COVID-19, the monkeypox vaccine, and answered listeners’ questions during this month’s edition of “Ask the Doctor.” Gergen-Barnett is the vice chair of Primary Care Innovation and Transformation in the Department of Family Medicine at Boston Medical Center and a Clinical Associate Professor at Boston University Medical School.

2h 41m
Jul 25
BPR Full Show: Old Cape Cod

Today on : We begin the show by opening phone lines, talking with listeners about last night’s Jan. 6 hearing. Devra First and Christopher Muther join us to share their list of hidden gems on Cape Cod. First writes about food and reviews restaurants for the Boston Globe. Muther is a travel writer for the Boston Globe. Shirley Leung discusses efforts to protect abortion rights in Mass., and the state of the MBTA in the wake of the Orange line train fire over the Mystic River on Thursday. Leung is a business columnist for the Boston Globe. Bill McKibben talks about his recent book, “The Flag, the Cross, and the Station Wagon: A Graying American Looks Back at His Suburban Boyhood and Wonders What the Hell Happened." He also shares his thoughts on heat waves across the U.S. and Europe. McKibben is an author, educator and environmentalist. He’s the founder of 350.org https://350.org/ and ThirdAct.org https://thirdact.org/. He has a new newsletter on Substack titled “The Crucial Years.” https://billmckibben.substack.com/ He’s also got a new, serialized book titled “The Other Cheek: An Epic Nonviolent Yarn.” Andy Ihnatko updates us on the latest tech headlines, focusing on the publishing industry’s lawsuit against the Internet Archive. Ihnatko is a tech writer and blogger, posting at Ihnatko.com http://ihnatko.com/. David Ibbett and James Monroe talks about translating the science of black holes into song through the Black Hole Symphony. Cellist Johnny Mok, soprano Agnes Coakley-Cox, and flutist and piccolo player Jessica Smith perform. Ibbett is the founder of the Multiverse Concert Series, and composer of the Black Hole Symphony. Monroe is the Senior Producer Adult Programs & Theater Experiences at the Museum of Science. We then ask listeners to share their favorite places to visit on Cape Cod.

2h 41m
Jul 22
BPR Full Show: "Ask the Governor," Tanglewood, and more

Today on : We begin the show by asking listeners about the case for former President Donald Trump’s prosecution following the Jan. 6 hearings. Then, we re-air a segment with Lee Feinberg and Terri Randall about the NOVA documentary “Ultimate Space Telescope,” and the James Webb Space Telescope. Andrea Cabral shares her thoughts on the upcoming Jan. 6 hearing, as well as Steve Bannon's contempt of Congress trial and the Biden administration’s response to the Supreme Court’s decision. Cabral is the former Suffolk County sheriff and secretary of public safety, and former CEO of the cannabis company Ascend. Gov. Charlie Baker joins us to talk about the state of the MBTA, the future of abortion access, and his plan to tackle the housing crisis. He also answered listeners’ questions and calls during “Ask the Governor.” Baker is Governor of Massachusetts. Andris Nelsons discusses the way COVID-19 has impacted musicians, the reemergence of vocal performances at Tanglewood, and his upcoming summer concerts with the Boston Symphony Orchestra. Nelsons is Music Director of the Boston Symphony Orchestra and the Leipzig Gewandhaus Orchestra.

2h 41m
Jul 21
BPR Full Show: No Shirts, No Shoes, No Service

Today on : We begin the show by asking listeners how they’re coping with the heat in Boston. Juliette Kayyem discusses record-breaking heat across Europe, and the Secret Service reportedly turning over just one text to the Jan. 6 panel. Kayyem is an analyst for CNN, former assistant secretary at the Department of Homeland Security and faculty chair of the Homeland Security program at Harvard University’s Kennedy School of Government. Boston City Councilor Ricardo Arroyo weighs in on the Boston Police Department’s response to the Patriot Front march through downtown Boston in early July. He also shares his thoughts on Boston’s new police commissioner, Michael Cox. Paul Reville talks about Education Commissioner Jeff Riley’s proposal to raise the passing score needed for 10th grade MCAS tests. Reville is the former secretary of education and a professor at Harvard University’s Graduate School of Education, where he also runs the Education Redesign Lab. His latest book, co-authored with Lynne Sacks, is “Collaborative Action for Equity and Opportunity: A Practical Guide for School and Community Leaders.” Art Caplan shares his thoughts on the doctor who performed an abortion for a 10-year-old rape victim from Ohio taking the first legal step against Indiana Attorney General Todd Rokita in a potential defamation case. Caplan is the Drs. William F. and Virginia Connolly Mitty Professor and founding head of the Division of Medical Ethics at NYU School of Medicine in New York City. Sy Montgomery talks about black bears breaking into New Hampshire homes, and explains how to keep pets safe and cool during heat waves. Montgomery is a journalist, naturalist and BPR contributor. Her latest book is "The Hawk’s Way: Encounters with Fierce Beauty.” We end the show by talking with listeners about their summer office attire.

2h 41m
Jul 20
BPR Full Show: Emerald Tutus

Today on : Sen. Ed Markey discusses the future of climate legislation in Congress, and calls for reforming the Supreme Court and abolishing the filibuster. Then, we open the phone lines, asking listeners if it’s time to expand the Supreme Court. Prof. Julia Hopkins explains the focus of her “Emerald Tutu” project, which would create a skirt of floating greenery along the most vulnerable parts of Boston’s shore. Hopkins is an assistant professor of Civil and Environmental Engineering at Northeastern University, and on a team of researchers hoping to install an “Emerald Tutu” along the city’s coast.  Ryan Landry shares his current projects, from recent paintings to upcoming performances. Landry is a playwright, actor, songwriter, painter and canned tomato influencer. Adam Conover joins us ahead of his upcoming performances at Laugh Boston to talk about his new Netflix show “The G Word with Adam Conover” and reflect on the end of “Adam Ruins Everything.” Conover is  a self-described investigative comedian. Sue O’Connell talks about obstacles to gender equity in the workplace. O’Connell is the co-publisher of Bay Windows and South End News, and contributor to Current, on NBC L-X and NECN. We end the show by asking listeners if they’ve ever napped at work.

2h 44m
Jul 19
Corby Kummer: Making the Mocha Connection

Westford-based group Mocha Connection is partnering with farmers in Yemen to bring back the country’s status as a significant global supplier of coffee beans. Yemen, which has been engaged in a civil war for nearly a decade, is known for its distinct, chocolatey coffee beans that grow well in the country’s rich soil. In fact, mocha gets its name from Yemen’s port city Mocha, which is widely regarded as the birthplace of the coffee trade. “Four locally-based Yemeni natives are managing to get [coffee beans] out of Yemen, and are exporting coffee right here,” award-winning food writer Corby Kummer told . “I am so excited about it — I'm immediately going to mail order it.”

23m
Jul 18
BPR Full Show: Heatwave

Today on EJ Dionne talks about Democrats’ recent legislative struggles in Congress including Sen. Joe Manchin’s refusal to support climate change plans, codifying , the plausibility of removing the filibuster, and the upcoming Jan. 6 hearings. Dionne is a senior fellow at The Brookings Institution. His latest book is “Code Red: How Progressives and Moderates Can Unite to Save Our Country.” Then, we ask listeners how they’re feeling about the state of the climate inaction. Michael Curry shares dispatches from the NAACP annual convention, including the way that communities of color are responding to President Joe Biden and Vice President Kamala Harris’ performances so far. He also shares his thoughts on Boston’s response to the new COVID-19 variant. Curry is chair of the NAACP Advocacy and Policy Committee, and is president and CEO of the Mass League of Community Health Centers. Revs. Irene Monroe and Emmett G. Price III discuss Pope Francis’ recent visit to Canada to apologize for abuse against Indigenous people in residential schools, the general opinions of the decision in church communities of color, and the history of Negro Election Day, which may soon become a state holiday in Mass. Monroe is a syndicated religion columnist and the Boston voice for Detour’s African American Heritage Trail. Price is founding pastor of Community of Love Christian Fellowship in Allston, and the Inaugural Dean of Africana Studies at Berklee College of Music. Together, they host GBH's “All Rev’d Up” podcast. Christopher Wilkins talks about the Boston Landmarks Orchestra’s upcoming Summer series, as well as the importance of accessibility in their performances, and diversity in their composers. Wilkins is the Boston Landmarks Orchestra’s music director. Corby Kummer discusses Belmont’s Cafe Vanak being named one of the premier cafes in the world, the closure of Rep. Lauren Boebert’s gun-themed restaurant, a movie theater coming to Boston which serves full meals to its patrons, and the difficulties of patronizing Russian themed restaurants. Kummer is executive director of the food and society policy program at the Aspen Institute, a senior editor at The Atlantic and a senior lecturer at the Tufts Friedman School of Nutrition Science and Policy. We end the show by talking about the heatwave coming to Boston.

2h 41m
Jul 18
BPR Full Show: Foraging, ice fishing and other first-hand food

Today on : We begin the show by asking listeners their thoughts on the push to switch to electric cars. Then, we re-air a segment with environmentalist Bill McKibben about the United States’ lack of action on climate policy. Callie Crossley discusses the 10-year-old rape victim in Ohio who went to Indiana for an abortion, and the launch of 988, a new suicide and crisis hotline. Crossley hosts GBH’s Under the Radar and Basic Black. Sue O’Connell reflects on the life and legacy of Ivana Trump, former President Donald Trump’s first wife, and West Virginia Senator Joe Manchin sinking President Joe Biden’s climate legislation. O’Connell is the co-publisher of Bay Windows and the South End News, as well as NECN's political commentator and explainer-in-chief. Tamar Haspel previews her book on growing food, and tells stories from a year spent foraging. Haspel is a James Beard Award–winning columnist for the Washington Post and author of the new book “To Boldly Grow: Finding Joy, Adventure, and Dinner in Your Own Backyard.” Catie Curtis plays a few of her songs, including “Dad's Yard,” “April in Boston” and “Kiss That Counted.” Curtis is a singer and songwriter. She’ll be playing alongside Maya Sharp at the Ground Floor in Freeport Maine on July 22, and on Saturday July 23rd at the Natick Center for the Arts. Then, we talk with listeners about their efforts to grow their own food.

2h 44m
Jul 15
BPR Full Show: Summer in New England

Today on Jon Gruber discusses the latest on inflation, including the potential strategies of the Federal Reserve Bank and why the middle class is being left behind. He also explains the economic impacts of government failure and whether the US is heading in that direction. Gruber is the Ford Professor of Economics at MIT. His latest book is “Jump-Starting America How Breakthrough Science Can Revive Economic Growth and the American Dream https://www.jump-startingamerica.com/.” Then, we ask listeners how they’re dealing with rising inflation. Stephanie Leydon and Sarah Betancourt talk about their reporting https://www.wgbh.org/news/local-news/2022/06/29/new-east-boston-affordable-housing-effort-would-be-the-first-of-its-kind-in-massachusetts on housing inflation and scarcity in Massachusetts from their new series “Priced Out https://www.wgbh.org/news/pricedout,” and share about some of the stories they’ve looked into so far. Leydon is the Director of Special Projects at GBH. Betancourt is a reporter for GBH News. Then, we take listener calls responding to the housing crisis in Massachusetts.  Jared Bowen shares the latest in the Boston arts scene, including Neil Diamond's 'Beautiful Noise' at the Colonial, Michael R. Jackson’s “A Strange Loop,” which just premiered on Broadway, the immersive show “Beyond King Tut” at the SoWa Power Station and ProBlak Gibbs’ new mural on the Greenway “Breathe Life Together.” Bowen is GBH’s executive arts editor and the host of Open Studio. Matt Gertz talks about the link between right-wing media and today’s politics, including Fox News’ response to the Jan 6th hearings, its relationship to former President Donald Trump and criticism of Pete Buttigieg’s recent interview. Gertz is a senior fellow for Media Matters for America, which reports on news from the conservative media landscape.   Mitra Kaboli and Ben Riskin preview their new podcast, “Welcome to Provincetown https://podcasts.apple.com/us/podcast/welcome-to-provincetown/id1625366072.” They share their inspiration for creating the podcast, and reflect on the stories they tell in it and their own experiences in the town. Kaboli is an audio documentarian, sound designer & artist, who hosts and co-created Welcome to Provincetown. Riskin is the principal of Room Tone https://roomtone.fm/, an audio advisory providing strategy consulting, business development, and management services to enterprise and independent podcasters, he co-created Welcome to Provincetown.  We end the show by asking listeners what makes summer in New England great.

2h 44m
Jul 14