Cato Event Podcast

Cato Institute

About

Podcast of policy and book forums, Capitol Hill briefings and other events from the Cato Institute

Our GDPR privacy policy was updated on August 8, 2022. Visit acast.com/privacy for more information.

Available on

Community

1882 episodes

Tunisia’s Authoritarian Turn

More than a decade ago, Tunisia’s Jasmine Revolution gave hope to the Arab world, showing oppressed peoples that longtime dictators can be peacefully ousted. That hope soon failed, brutally, in Egypt, Syria, and Yemen, but Tunisia kept on track throughout the 2010s, proving to be the best democratic hope in an otherwise autocratic and turbulent Middle East. Yet since July 2021, Tunisia’s trajectory has taken an increasingly worrisome reversal as well. President Kais Saied suspended the parliament, claimed all executive power, prohibited public gatherings, arrested political opponents, and imposed travel bans. As Cato senior fellow Doug Bandow recently observed on a visit to Tunisia, this authoritarian turn risks the freedoms Tunisians have been enjoying in the past 10 years and can throw the country back to arbitrary rule by a strongman. The change is concerning for the broader Arab and Muslim world, where Tunisia used to be a rare example and source of inspiration. Join us as we discuss these changes and what Tunisia’s future may hold. * See acast.com/privacy https://acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

1h 0m
Jul 19
The United States of Anonymous: How the First Amendment Shaped Online Speech

Why did those opposed to or in favor of the Constitution write under pseudonyms? Why did Occupy Wall Street protestors wear Guy Fawkes masks? Why do so many people seek to maintain a level of anonymity in their online activities—including web surfing and posting on social media? In the debate over the right to conceal one’s identity versus the potential harms of anonymity, is it possible to strike a constitutionally sound balance? In his latest book, , Jeff Kosseff tackles these and other questions through primary‐​source research and interviews with participants in the debates, as well as through court cases that have shaped the current legal and political climate impacting anonymous speech and the First Amendment. Join us for a discussion about Jeff Kosseff’s timely new book. * See acast.com/privacy https://acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

2h 0m
Jul 07
What Will Be the Impact of the War in Ukraine for the Future of European Security?

Russia’s invasion of Ukraine has produced big changes in NATO and EU states. But shock at Russia’s aggression and fear of its future intentions seem to point in one direction, whereas its dismal military performance and its vulnerability to economic punishment seem to point in another. NATO and EU expansion are once again on the table. Will the aftermath of the war strengthen NATO and, with it, the central U.S. position in European security? Or can Russian aggression impel greater non‐​NATO security cooperation, giving European states and the EU a larger role to play and a greater say over security affairs in Europe? On the first day of NATO’s summit in Madrid, please join Nicole Koenig and Barry Posen for a discussion of what the war in Ukraine suggests about the future of European security. * See acast.com/privacy https://acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

59m
Jun 29
Black Liberation through the Marketplace: Hope, Heartbreak, and the Promise of America

The experiences of black Americans do not fit neatly into our nation’s political culture. As the authors argue, those on the right fail to acknowledge the gravity of past injustices and rights violations, while those on the left ignore decades of failed paternalism and unintended consequences of government policy. But there is an alternative: classical liberalism, a philosophy based on free markets, individual rights, and vibrant civil society. Exhausted by extremism on both sides, in their new book, , economic philosopher Rachel Ferguson and historian Marcus Witcher argue that classical liberalism provides the building blocks for a free and prosperous society for all. * See acast.com/privacy https://acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

1h 34m
Jun 17
How Drug Paraphernalia Laws Undermine Harm Reduction

State‐​level drug paraphernalia laws increase the risk of infection or overdose for drug users by preventing legal access to clean needles, syringes, and products to test drugs for deadly contaminants. Every state except Alaska criminalizes the possession and/​or sale of illicit drug paraphernalia. Thus, Alaskans can legally operate needle exchange programs and other harm‐​reduction measures. Recognizing that harm‐​reduction strategies reduce overdoses and disease, many states are considering reforms to their drug paraphernalia laws. To discuss the impact of drug paraphernalia laws on health and how states can implement better rules, we are pleased to have Corey S. Davis, the director of the Harm Reduction Legal Project of the Network for Public Health Law and adjunct faculty at the Brody School of Medicine at East Carolina University; Robin Lutz, executive director of the Alaskan AIDS Assistance Association, which has provided harm‐​reduction services in Alaska since 1985; and Haley B. Coles, executive director of Sonoran Prevention Works, which has been engaged in harm‐​reduction and syringe services in Arizona since 2010. The discussion will be moderated by Cato Institute senior fellow Jeffrey A. Singer. * See acast.com/privacy https://acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

1h 2m
Jun 17
Taxation and Democracy Webinar

Tax policy not only funds governmental efforts but is often itself a driver of policy outcomes. Elected officials in recent years have pushed for or acted upon tax policy as a means for shaping everything from childcare to environmental policy. In this webinar, we’ll explore the role taxation plays in our democracy, the many ways in which it affects our lives, and the current state of debate around taxation in America. Our panel will feature ALEX MURESIANU, federal tax analyst at The Tax Foundation and NIKO LUSIANI, the director of the Corporate Power Program at the Roosevelt Institute. ALLAN CAREY, director of Sphere Education Initiative, will moderate the conversation. ZOE CALLAWAY, manager of education and outreach at the Tax Foundation will offer professional development. * See acast.com/privacy https://acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

1h 4m
Jun 06
Financial Privacy in a Digital Era

The digitalization of financial services has made banking and trading more convenient than ever. But laws that were written before the digital era now collect untold amounts of consumer data to which the government has easy—and often unfettered—access. Recent legislative attempts have sought to expand that access even more. Does financial convenience have to come at the cost of financial privacy? Can cryptocurrency provide better privacy protection? Is it time to rethink how financial privacy is treated in a digital era? Join us for an outstanding virtual program featuring Marta Belcher, Paul Belonick, Michael Mosier, and Jennifer Schulp to discuss financial privacy in the digital era. * See acast.com/privacy https://acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

59m
Apr 21
Luncheon Address: Moral Courage for Divided Times

* See acast.com/privacy https://acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

42m
Apr 14
Back to the Future? The Return of Major War in Europe

* See acast.com/privacy https://acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

23m
Apr 14
Why We Need a Movement for Freedom.

* See acast.com/privacy https://acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

39m
Apr 14
Reducing Risk from Arms Sales

The United States remains the world’s dominant exporter of weapons. Between 2017–2021, the U.S. share of the global arms market was 108 percent greater than that of Russia, which is the second‐​largest exporter. Since 2009, the United States has approved more than $1 trillion in weapons sales and delivered roughly $736 billion worth of weapons to 167 countries during the Obama, Trump, and Biden administrations. A new Cato Institute update to the  https://www.cato.org/study/2021-arms-sales-risk-index evaluates the risk that these exports create for global human rights, international stability, and U.S. security. Representative Sara Jacobs (D‑CA), Cato’s Jordan Cohen, and Jeff Abramson from the Arms Control Association will discuss the  and current efforts to weigh and mitigate risks that the sale of U.S. weapons can pose. The discussion will be moderated by Cato’s Eric Gomez. * See acast.com/privacy https://acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

58m
Apr 01
The Status of Homeschooling Two Years into the Pandemic

On March 26, 2020—two weeks after schools around the country were shuttered and suddenly almost everyone was receiving education at home—Cato convened an expert panel to give advice and answer questions about homeschooling. It is unlikely anyone who participated in that discussion expected we would still be dealing with school closures two years later. While there are lags in official data, it appears that homeschooling has greatly increased since March 2020. Is that accurate? What has the experience been like for families, including longtime homeschoolers and newbies who started during the pandemic? What lessons have been learned? We’ll mark the two‐​year anniversary of school closures with a panel discussion on homeschooling today. Featuring a diverse group whose experiences include urban homeschooling, hybrid homeschooling, and forest schools, this panel is designed to assess the current state of homeschooling and help parents understand the wide variety of options available to them. * See acast.com/privacy https://acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

1h 30m
Mar 23
Peace through School Choice: Examining the Evidence

Public schooling, by forcing people with diverse values and needs to fund a single system of government schools, inevitably produces conflict. Such conflict has reached a fever pitch over the last several years, with Americans battling over critical race theory, LGBTQ issues, COVID-19 masking, and more. Logically, school choice would defuse such conflict, enabling diverse people to choose what they think is best rather than having to fight for control of a single system. But is there evidence of that working? If so, where? And how does that not lead to Balkanization? Three experts in education and pluralism will discuss whether and how school choice can foster peace in a large, diverse society. The event will focus on questions and comments from audience members. We hope anyone interested in the role of education in bringing diverse people together will join us. * See acast.com/privacy https://acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

1h 29m
Mar 22
Weltschmerz: How the West Lost Its Mojo and What Liberals Can Do to Fix It

A generation ago, humanity witnessed the fall of the Berlin Wall, the disappearance of the Eastern European bloc, and the breakup of the Soviet Union. Many thought that the victory of liberal democracy and competitive enterprise over communism and central planning would usher in a lasting era of peace and prosperity, but now the West appears to be undergoing an existential crisis. Across some of the most successful societies in history, liberal institutions are under attack from the far left and the far right. What brought about this stunning crisis of confidence in Western values and institutions and the ascendency of political and economic populism? Please join us to hear two leading thinkers and commentators on the rise of free societies explain the reasons for the growth of illiberalism and what, if anything, can be done to reverse that trend. * See acast.com/privacy https://acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

1h 30m
Mar 21
Free Speech: A History from Socrates to Social Media

* See acast.com/privacy https://acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

1h 26m
Feb 17
Fresh Approaches to the Overdose Crisis

* See acast.com/privacy https://acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

58m
Feb 15
Polarization and the Executive Branch Webinar

American politics has moved beyond merely Team Blue and Team Red, or even tribal affiliations, and into an era of political sectarianism. In this webinar, the Cato Institute’s Gene Healy will discuss how polarization has taken on an element of the religious, the role of the executive branch in exacerbating this trend, and what can be done to start to reverse this tide. * See acast.com/privacy https://acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

52m
Feb 14
Luncheon Address - Governor Sununu

* See acast.com/privacy https://acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

47m
Feb 14
The Supply Chain Crisis Was Decades in the Making

* See acast.com/privacy https://acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

17m
Feb 14
Keynote Address – Why We Need a Movement for Freedom

* See acast.com/privacy https://acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

38m
Feb 14
Freest in the 50 States: A Discussion with New Hampshire Governor Chris Sununu

Please join us for a virtual policy conversation with Chris Sununu, the governor of New Hampshire. In the past two years, Governor Sununu and the State of New Hampshire have topped Cato’s rankings for both our Fiscal Policy Report Card on America’s Governors and our recently released  https://www.freedominthe50states.org/ report. The online discussion will feature Governor Sununu and William Ruger and Jason Sorens (authors of the  report). * See acast.com/privacy https://acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

1h 6m
Feb 03
Catastrophic Success: Why Foreign‐​Imposed Regime Change Goes Wrong

The United States is enamored with regime change. Washington has toppled more than 30 foreign leaders since the start of the 20th century, making it the world leader in regime change by a wide margin. Yet, as the U.S. experience in Afghanistan shows, regime change often has devastating unintended consequences. Author Alexander B. Downes will discuss how regime change often leads to conflict by disintegrating the targeted state’s military and creating a foreign master for the new government. While different kinds of regime change have different levels of risk, Downes will explain that, on balance, regime change increases the likelihood of conflict both within the targeted state and between the target and the intervener. Please join us for a discussion with the author and a panel of experts. * See acast.com/privacy https://acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

1h 27m
Jan 27
Religious Freedom, Islam, and Civil Discourse

Toleration and religious freedom put an end to centuries of bloody conflict and persecution in Europe. But what gave rise to these ideas, and can they be found in other civilizations? In this Sphere Education Initiatives webinar, Mustafa Akyol will share the ideological foundations of religious freedom and assess the challenges and prospects in the Muslim world. The conversation will also consider the contemporary importance of religious freedom and the idea of civil discourse. * See acast.com/privacy https://acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

54m
Jan 26
Would ‘Medicare for All’ Mean Quality for All? How Public‐​Option Principles Could Reverse Medicare’s Negative Impact on Quality

Since the program’s creation in 1965, Medicare has had a negative impact on health care quality. Researchers have documented widespread quality problems for decades, yet Congress and Medicare administrators have failed to enact meaningful reform. Medicare’s negative impact on quality should give even the staunchest Medicare for All advocates pause. A new article https://papers.ssrn.com/sol3/papers.cfm?abstract_id=3912767 by Michael F. Cannon and Jacqueline Pohida proposes the novel solution of applying traditionally Democratic “public option” principles to Medicare. Public‐​option advocates argue that when a government health plan and private insurers compete for enrollees on a level playing field, competition will deliver more of what enrollees want. Applying public‐​option principles to Medicare requires eliminating any advantages traditional Medicare or private insurers may have to create a completely level playing field between all forms of health insurance. Public‐​option principles would promote quality within Medicare by allowing open competition between different payment rules and quality‐​improvement programs. At this virtual event, leading health policy experts will discuss how Medicare impacts health care quality and what policymakers should do to give enrollees the update in health care quality they deserve. * See acast.com/privacy https://acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

59m
Jan 20
Federal Debt and Spending: A Crisis?

About $29 trillion of federal debt. Trillions more in proposed spending by Congress. Every day features more news stories about federal debt and spending. Are we in a spending and debt crisis? Join us for a conversation with three policy experts to learn the facts about the current situation and the potential consequences. Following our panel discussion, the Foundation for Teaching Economics will introduce new lessons developed to help you bring this important conversation to your classroom. Our panel will feature CHRIS EDWARDS, director of tax policy studies at the Cato Institute, BRIAN RIEDL, senior fellow at the Manhattan Institute, and WILLIAM GALE, Arjay and Frances Fearing Miller Chair in Federal Economic Policy at the Brookings Institution. CARYN ROSSITER, manager of Sphere Education Initiatives, will moderate the conversation. DEBBIE HENNEY, curriculum director at the Foundation for Teaching Economics, will offer professional development. * See acast.com/privacy https://acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

1h 33m
Jan 18
New Technology and Old Rules: Constructing a Crypto Regulatory Framework - A Path Forward

Cryptocurrency regulation sits at the intersection of multiple regulatory regimes, and both financial market regulators and banking regulators, among many others, have asserted authority over certain aspects of crypto regulation. This has resulted in an overlapping and incomplete regulatory framework that has drawn criticism from both proponents and skeptics of crypto innovation. So, how is cryptocurrency regulated? How should it be regulated? Who should regulate it? Cato’s Center for Monetary and Financial Alternatives is looking at these questions through a series of policy forums that examine the roles of different regulators and consider what type of regulatory framework should be adopted to balance the risks and innovative potential of cryptocurrencies. This fourth and final panel in this series builds on previous discussions about commodities, banking, and securities regulation to consider alternatives for a crypto regulatory framework. Join Jake Chervinsky, Alan Cohn, and Angela Walch in a panel moderated by Nikhilesh De from CoinDesk to discuss the future of crypto regulation. * See acast.com/privacy https://acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

1h 1m
Jan 13
The China Initiative: Origins and Consequences

On September 9, 2021, federal judge Thomas A. Varlan acquitted former University of Tennessee professor Dr. Anming Hu of all charges related to a Department of Justice investigation that alleged that Hu committed wire fraud and made false statements about his alleged Chinese government research ties. On November 5, 2021, a federal jury convicted Yanjun Xu, a Chinese national and an official in the Chinese Ministry of State Security, of attempted economic espionage and theft of trade secrets. The differing outcomes of these two cases involve a common thread: the Department of Justice’s China Initiative, an investigative program launched in 2018 to deter and disrupt alleged or actual Chinese government espionage or intellectual property (IP) theft targeting U.S. researchers, universities, and businesses. These two cases raise key questions. How extensive is Chinese government espionage and IP theft targeting the United States? Is the China Initiative a form of racial or ethnic profiling? How has the China Initiative impacted U.S.-Chinese information and technology exchanges and cooperation? How has the U.S. academic community responded to these events? Join us as our expert panel explores all these issues. * See acast.com/privacy https://acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

1h 57m
Dec 16, 2021
Welcome and Introduction - Opening Keynote: The Fourth Amendment is Not for Sale

Americans in the age of COVID-19 are relying more than ever on digital networks to work, socialize, and learn—which makes safeguarding the privacy and security of those networks even more essential. The 2021 Cato Surveillance Conference brings together an outstanding lineup of academics, technologists, policymakers, and privacy advocates to discuss the most pressing topics in privacy and digital civil liberties, kicking off with a keynote address from Sen. Ron Wyden (D‑OR). Speakers will examine how the “surveillance‐​industrial complex” is increasingly outsourcing surveillance that used to be the exclusive province of intelligence agencies to a burgeoning private surveillance industry. We’ll look at how a year of virtual classrooms has given rise to a disturbing trend of schools employing spyware to monitor students. We’ll explore how anonymity—increasingly the scapegoat for everything toxic about online culture—is crucial to free speech and a vibrant culture of dissent. And we’ll demonstrate just how vulnerable the ubiquitous “Internet of Things” makes us with a live hacking demonstration. Join us live online, streaming from the Cato Institute. * See acast.com/privacy https://acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

17m
Dec 16, 2021
The Atlas of Surveillance

Americans in the age of COVID-19 are relying more than ever on digital networks to work, socialize, and learn—which makes safeguarding the privacy and security of those networks even more essential. The 2021 Cato Surveillance Conference brings together an outstanding lineup of academics, technologists, policymakers, and privacy advocates to discuss the most pressing topics in privacy and digital civil liberties, kicking off with a keynote address from Sen. Ron Wyden (D‑OR). Speakers will examine how the “surveillance‐​industrial complex” is increasingly outsourcing surveillance that used to be the exclusive province of intelligence agencies to a burgeoning private surveillance industry. We’ll look at how a year of virtual classrooms has given rise to a disturbing trend of schools employing spyware to monitor students. We’ll explore how anonymity—increasingly the scapegoat for everything toxic about online culture—is crucial to free speech and a vibrant culture of dissent. And we’ll demonstrate just how vulnerable the ubiquitous “Internet of Things” makes us with a live hacking demonstration. Join us live online, streaming from the Cato Institute. * See acast.com/privacy https://acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

14m
Dec 16, 2021
Targeted but Not Silenced: Government Surveillance and Retaliation against Immigration Organizers in the United States

Americans in the age of COVID-19 are relying more than ever on digital networks to work, socialize, and learn—which makes safeguarding the privacy and security of those networks even more essential. The 2021 Cato Surveillance Conference brings together an outstanding lineup of academics, technologists, policymakers, and privacy advocates to discuss the most pressing topics in privacy and digital civil liberties, kicking off with a keynote address from Sen. Ron Wyden (D‑OR). Speakers will examine how the “surveillance‐​industrial complex” is increasingly outsourcing surveillance that used to be the exclusive province of intelligence agencies to a burgeoning private surveillance industry. We’ll look at how a year of virtual classrooms has given rise to a disturbing trend of schools employing spyware to monitor students. We’ll explore how anonymity—increasingly the scapegoat for everything toxic about online culture—is crucial to free speech and a vibrant culture of dissent. And we’ll demonstrate just how vulnerable the ubiquitous “Internet of Things” makes us with a live hacking demonstration. Join us live online, streaming from the Cato Institute. * See acast.com/privacy https://acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

19m
Dec 16, 2021