Ipse Dixit

CC0/Public Domain

About

Ipse Dixit is a podcast on legal scholarship. Each episode of Ipse Dixit features a different guest discussing their scholarship. The podcast also features several special series.

  1. "From the Archives" consists historical recordings potentially of interest to legal scholars and lawyers.
  2. "The Homicide Squad" consists of investigations of the true stories behind different murder ballads, as well as examples of how different musicians have interpreted the song over time.
  3. "The Day Antitrust Died?" is co-hosted with Ramsi Woodcock, Assistant Professor of Law at the University of Kentucky College of Law, and consists of oral histories of the 1974 Airlie House Conference on antitrust law, a pivotal moment in the history of antitrust theory and policy.

The hosts of Ipse Dixit are:

  • Brian L. Frye, Spears-Gilbert Associate Professor of Law at the University of Kentucky College of Law
  • Luce Nguyen, a student at Oberlin College and the co-founder of the Oberlin Policy Research Institute, an undergraduate public policy organization based at Oberlin College
  • Maybell Romero, Assistant Professor of Law at Northern Illinois University College of Law
  • Antonia Eliason, Assistant Professor of Law at the University of Mississippi School of Law
  • Saurabh Vishnubhakat, Associate Professor of Law at Texas A&M School of Law
  • John Culhane, Professor of Law at Widener University Delaware Law School
  • Benjamin Edwards, Associate Professor of Law at the UNLV William S. Boyd School of Law
  • Matthew Bruckner, Associate Professor of Law at Howard University School of Law

Comments and suggestions are always welcome at brianlfrye@gmail.com. You can follow the Ipse Dixit on Twitter at @IpseDixitPod.



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759 episodes

Paul Edelblut on Lucy v. Zehmer

In this episode, Paul Edelblut, the grandson of Welford O. Lucy, discusses the iconic 1954 contract case Lucy v. Zehmer and what he learned about it from his grandfather. This episode was hosted by Brian L. Frye http://law.uky.edu/directory/brian-l-frye, Spears-Gilbert Professor of Law at the University of Kentucky College of Law. Frye is on Twitter at @brianlfrye https://twitter.com/brianlfrye. * See acast.com/privacy https://acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

30m
Jul 26
Jorge Contreras on Gene Patents

In this episode, Jorge L. Contreras https://faculty.utah.edu/u0989706-JORGE_L_CONTRERAS/hm/index.hml, Professor of Law at the University of Utah College of Law, discusses his book "The Genome Defense: Inside the Epic Legal Battle to Determine Who Owns Your DNA https://genomedefense.org/," which is published by Algonquin Books. Contreras describes the landmark Supreme Court patent case Association for Molecular Pathology v. Myriad Genetics and explains why it was important. He recounts the story of the case and how he reported on it. And he reflects on what it can tell us about patent policy. This episode was hosted by Brian L. Frye http://law.uky.edu/directory/brian-l-frye, Spears-Gilbert Professor of Law at the University of Kentucky College of Law. Frye is on Twitter at @brianlfrye https://twitter.com/brianlfrye. * See acast.com/privacy https://acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

46m
Jun 28
Jordana Goodman on Authorship Credit and the Gender Gap

In this episode, Jordana Goodman, Visiting Clinical Assistant Professor at the Boston University School of Law, discusses her new article .  She argues that misattribution in the authorship of legal work disparately impacts underrepresented members of the legal profession, with a focus on women in patent law.  In her article, Professor Goodman reports empirical findings from a large novel dataset of agency actions and responses during the patent examination process in the United States Patent and Trademark Office.  She also addresses the larger professional and cultural implications of these findings and proposes reforms.  Professor Goodman’s article is forthcoming in the Yale Journal of Law & Technology and is available on SSRN https://ssrn.com/abstract=4105773.  She is on Twitter at @Jordi_Goodman https://twitter.com/Jordi_Goodman. This episode was hosted by Saurabh Vishnubhakat http://vishnubhakat.org/, Professor in the School of Law and Professor in the Dwight Look College of Engineering at Texas A&M University.  Professor Vishnubhakat is on Twitter at @emptydoors https://twitter.com/emptydoors. Disclosure:  Professors Goodman and Vishnubhakat are now collaborating on a follow-up paper that explores the gender gap among attorneys in administrative patent litigation before the USPTO Patent Trial and Appeal Board. * See acast.com/privacy https://acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

50m
May 10
Aliza Shatzman on Holding Judges Accountable

In this episode, Aliza Shatzman https://www.linkedin.com/in/aliza-shatzman-58b55223/, an attorney and advocate based in Washington, DC, discusses her article "Untouchable Judges? What I've learned about harassment in the judiciary, and what we can do to stop it https://papers.ssrn.com/sol3/papers.cfm?abstract_id=4096245," which will be published in the UCLA Journal of Gender & Law. Here is the abstract: * > Drawing from the author’s own experience of gender discrimination, harassment, and retaliation during her clerkship and in the years following it by a former DC Superior Court judge, this Article analyzes the deficits in current federal and DC judicial reporting systems to demonstrate the urgent need for reform. I argue that harassment in the judiciary is pervasive, due to both enormous power disparities between judges and law clerks, and various institutional barriers that perpetuate misconduct and discourage reporting. I survey existing methods of judicial discipline in both the federal and DC Courts and argue that these provide insufficient redress for workplace misconduct. I then discuss the Judiciary Accountability Act (JAA) (HR 4827/S 2553), which would finally protect judiciary employees, including law clerks and federal public defenders, under Title VII of the Civil Rights Act of 1964, enabling employees to sue their harassers and seek damages for harm done to their careers, reputations, and future earning potential. Furthermore, I argue that the DC Courts should be included in the JAA, because they are Article I courts created and regulated by Congress, and DC Courts judges are arguably federal judges for Title VII and disciplinary purposes. I also offer a variety of other proposed reforms, which would both strengthen the JAA and provide additional protections to uniquely vulnerable judiciary employees. I conclude by reflecting on my attempts to report the misconduct I experienced, how the systems failed me when I tried to report, and my efforts to seek justice for myself and accountability for the misbehaving former judge. This episode was hosted by Brian L. Frye http://law.uky.edu/directory/brian-l-frye, Spears-Gilbert Professor of Law at the University of Kentucky College of Law. Frye is on Twitter at @brianlfrye https://twitter.com/brianlfrye. * See acast.com/privacy https://acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

35m
Apr 29
Henry Thompson on Mafia Courts

In this episode, Henry A. Thompson https://www.henryathompson.com/, a Ph.D. student in economics at George Mason University, discusses his article "Cosa Nostra Courts https://papers.ssrn.com/sol3/papers.cfm?abstract_id=3977333." Here is the abstract: * > This paper uses economic reasoning to analyze the traditions and institutions of one of the most successful criminal organizations in modern history: La Cosa Nostra (LCN). Drawing on recently declassified FBI reports, the paper's analysis shows that LCN's core institutions are best understood as attempts to protect its secrecy, an asset vulnerable to free riding by its own members. Individual members did not bear the full costs of secret-revealing police investigations and thus had a perverse incentive to resolve disputes violently. LCN preserved its secrecy by incentivizing peaceful reconciliation. La Cosa Nostra rules, and, more importantly, its informal court system, kept disputes from escalating into violence, thereby helping LCN avoid secrecy-threatening investigations. As a result, LCN has become one of the most successful and long-lived criminal organizations in the U.S. This episode was hosted by Brian L. Frye http://law.uky.edu/directory/brian-l-frye, Spears-Gilbert Professor of Law at the University of Kentucky College of Law. Frye is on Twitter at @brianlfrye https://twitter.com/brianlfrye. * See acast.com/privacy https://acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

37m
Feb 23
NFT Notes 21: Laura Shin on the Story of Ethereum

In this episode, Laura Shin https://www.linkedin.com/in/laurashin/, journalist and host of the Unchained https://unchainedpodcast.com/ podcast, discusses her new book "The Cryptopians: Idealism, Greed, Lies, and the Making of the First Big Cryptocurrency Craze https://www.publicaffairsbooks.com/titles/laura-shin/the-cryptopians/9781541763005/," which is published by Public Affairs. Shin describes how she became interested in cryptocurrency, how she told the story of the creation of Ethereum, and what she learned while researching the story. This episode was hosted by Brian L. Frye http://law.uky.edu/directory/brian-l-frye, Spears-Gilbert Professor of Law at the University of Kentucky College of Law. Frye is on Twitter at @brianlfrye https://twitter.com/brianlfrye. * See acast.com/privacy https://acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

36m
Feb 23
Sarah Burstein & Saurabh Vishnubhakat on the Truth About Design Patents

In this episode, Sarah Burstein http://www.law.ou.edu/directory/sarah-burstein, Professor of Law at the University of Oklahoma College of Law, and Saraubh Vishnubhakat https://law.tamu.edu/faculty-staff/find-people/faculty-profiles/saurabh-vishnubhakat, Professor of Law at Texas A&M University School of Law, discuss their article "The Truth About Design Patents https://papers.ssrn.com/sol3/papers.cfm?abstract_id=4001099," which will be published in the American University Law Review. Here is the abstract: * > Design patents are hot. Scholars and policymakers are increasingly focusing on this once-niche area of law. However, many of the empirical studies in this area—including old ones that still get cited—rely on statistics and empirical conclusions that were methodologically questionable from the start, or have become outdated, or both. In this paper, we make two sets of contributions to that important and underdeveloped literature. First, we review the empirical studies of design patents thus far, including those that pre- and post-date the creation of the Federal Circuit, and we update the findings of those studies. Second, we consider a set of institutional questions that, to our knowledge, the prior literature has not even broached. Beyond the federal courts, we explore design patent enforcement at the ITC and the use of administrative process to challenge design patents in the Patent Trial and Appeal Board. These contributions put the design patent system into much-needed context with broader debates about U.S. intellectual property policy. This episode was hosted by Brian L. Frye http://law.uky.edu/directory/brian-l-frye, Spears-Gilbert Professor of Law at the University of Kentucky College of Law. Frye is on Twitter at @brianlfrye https://twitter.com/brianlfrye. * See acast.com/privacy https://acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

34m
Feb 23
NFT Notes 20: Sarah Moosvi on DAOs and the NFT Art Community

In this episode, Sarah Moosvi https://www.linkedin.com/in/sarahmaryammoosvi/ of Protean DAO https://mobile.twitter.com/proteandao, Tara Digital Collective https://twitter.com/tdcgallery and aGENDAdao https://twitter.com/aGENDAdao discusses now she became interested in NFTs and DAOs. Among other things, she explains why DAOs are a useful tool for NFT artists, and how NFT artists use the DAO structure in their work. She also reflects on problems with the DAO structure, including inequities DAOs can perpetuate, especially in relation to members of minoritized communities. This interview was conducted in the convention center at Art Basel Miami Beach. Moosvi is on Twitter at @m00sv1 https://twitter.com/m00sv1. This episode was hosted by Brian L. Frye http://law.uky.edu/directory/brian-l-frye, Spears-Gilbert Professor of Law at the University of Kentucky College of Law. Frye is on Twitter at @brianlfrye https://twitter.com/brianlfrye. * See acast.com/privacy https://acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

43m
Feb 23
NFT Notes 19: Simon Indelicate on Creating an NFT Collection

In this episode, Simon Indelicate https://www.indelicates.com/ of The Indelicates https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Indelicates describes the creation and sale of his first NFT collection, which consisted of 30 "perpetual admission tickets https://www.indelicates.com/arcadia/NFT.html" for an "imaginary theme park" called Arcadia Park https://www.indelicates.com/arcadia/. Simon describes his career as an independent musician, including the creation of the Arcadia Park album. He explains how he repurposed the album for an NFT collection, and why it was consistent with his long-standing objections to the music industry and how it uses copyright. He discusses his experiences, offering advice to other musicians interested in creating NFTs. And he reflects on the future of his project. Simon Indelicate is on Twitter at @simonindelicate https://twitter.com/simonindelicate and Arcadia Park is at @ArcadiaParkNews https://twitter.com/ArcadiaParkNews. This episode was hosted by Brian L. Frye http://law.uky.edu/directory/brian-l-frye, Spears-Gilbert Professor of Law at the University of Kentucky College of Law. Frye is on Twitter at @brianlfrye https://twitter.com/brianlfrye. * See acast.com/privacy https://acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

54m
Jan 19
Rebecca Curtin on Fanny Holmes's Impact on Bleistein

In this episode, Rebecca Curtin https://www.suffolk.edu/academics/faculty/r/c/rcurtin, Professor of Law at Suffolk University Law School, discusses her article "The Art (History) of ," which will be published in the Journal of the Copyright Society https://www.csusa.org/page/Journal. Curtin begins by explaining why Justice Holmes's opinion in https://scholar.google.com/scholar_case?case=3277054592305773876, 188 U.S. 239 (1903) is such a landmark of copyright doctrine. She observes that Holmes made many unusual and unnecessary observations about the nature of art in the opinion, and argues that his perspective was influenced by his wife, Fanny Holmes, who was a successful artist, working in the medium of embroidery. She describes Fanny Holmes's work, why it has been largely lost to history, and how it might have affected Holmes's opinion. Curtin's scholarship is available on SSRN https://papers.ssrn.com/sol3/cf_dev/AbsByAuth.cfm?per_id=1918261. This episode was hosted by Brian L. Frye http://law.uky.edu/directory/brian-l-frye, Spears-Gilbert Professor of Law at the University of Kentucky College of Law. Frye is on Twitter at @brianlfrye https://twitter.com/brianlfrye. * See acast.com/privacy https://acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

31m
Jan 19
NFT Notes 18: Aleksandra Artamonovskaja on the Art Market & the NFT Market

In this episode, Aleksandra Artamonovskaja https://www.aleksandra.art/, co-founder of Electric Artifacts https://www.electricartefacts.art/ and head of marketing at Fragcolor https://medium.com/@fragcolor, discusses her work curating digital art and NFTs. Artamonovskaja begins by describing her background in the traditional art market. She explains how she became interested in digital art and NFTs, and how the rapid rise of the NFT market has changed the art world. She reflects on what those changes mean for artists and collectors. And she discusses some of the trends in the art market she finds especially interesting. Artamonovskaja is on Twitter at @aljaparis https://twitter.com/aljaparis. This episode was hosted by Brian L. Frye http://law.uky.edu/directory/brian-l-frye, Spears-Gilbert Professor of Law at the University of Kentucky College of Law. Frye is on Twitter at @brianlfrye https://twitter.com/brianlfrye. * See acast.com/privacy https://acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

41m
Nov 26, 2021
NFT Notes 17: DEAFBEEF on Creating Generative Art on the Blockchain

In this episode, DEAFBEEF https://www.deafbeef.com/, an NFT artist who creates generative audiovisual art completely on the blockchain, describes his artistic process and experiences in the NFT space. Tyler begins by describing his background in engineering, computer, science, animation, and music. He explains how he has used computer code to create generative works of audiovisual art for many years. He describes how he got interested in making art on the blockchain, how he conceptualizes the blockchain in relation to his work, and how his work has been received. He reflects on his experiences in the NFT market. And he describes his plans going forward. DEAFBEEF is on Twitter at @_deafbeef https://twitter.com/_deafbeef. This episode was hosted by Brian L. Frye http://law.uky.edu/directory/brian-l-frye, Spears-Gilbert Professor of Law at the University of Kentucky College of Law. Frye is on Twitter at @brianlfrye https://twitter.com/brianlfrye. * See acast.com/privacy https://acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

53m
Nov 26, 2021
From the Archives 112: Social Security Messages

This is an LP of PSAs created by the Social Security Administration. This recording is from the Internet Archive Great 78 Project https://archive.org/details/78_social-security-messages_gbia0349027a. * See acast.com/privacy https://acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

18m
Nov 23, 2021
NFT Notes 16: Luke Barwikowski on Engineering NFT and Web3 Projects

In this episode, Luke Barwikowsky https://www.linkedin.com/in/lbarwiko/, a sofeware engineer and founder and CEO of pixels.online https://www.pixels.online/, discusses his work in the NFT space. He begins by explaining his background in software engineering. He reflects on his initial skepticism of NFTs and Web3, and why he changed his mind. He discusses his work creating different platforms, focusing on how and why he has integrated NFTs into those platforms. And he reflects on the future of the NFT space and Web3. Barwikowski is on Twitter at @whatslukedoing https://twitter.com/whatslukedoing. This episode was hosted by Brian L. Frye http://law.uky.edu/directory/brian-l-frye, Spears-Gilbert Professor of Law at the University of Kentucky College of Law. Frye is on Twitter at @brianlfrye https://twitter.com/brianlfrye. * See acast.com/privacy https://acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

28m
Nov 23, 2021
NFT Notes 15: Loucas Braconnier on Creating Conceptual Art NFTs

In this episode, Loucas Braconnier https://jpg.space/salt, an NFT artist known as Figure 31 http://www.figure31.com/, discusses his artwork and experiences in the NFT space. He begins by describing how he got interested in coin trading and DeFi during art school. He explains how he made the transition to creating digital works in the form of NFTs. He describes the process of conceptualizing and creating works like LYAM http://www.figure31.com/lyam?about (Last Year at Marienbad) and SALT http://www.figure31.com/salt?about. And he reflects on how his work is informed by the nature of the NFT medium. He discusses why the NFT market has been a benefit to himself and other artists. And he reflects on the future of the NFT market and his own work. Braconnier is on Twitter at @figure31_ https://twitter.com/figure31_. This episode was hosted by Brian L. Frye http://law.uky.edu/directory/brian-l-frye, Spears-Gilbert Professor of Law at the University of Kentucky College of Law. Frye is on Twitter at @brianlfrye https://twitter.com/brianlfrye. * See acast.com/privacy https://acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

37m
Nov 23, 2021
NFT Notes 14: Yohei Nakajima on a Venture Capitalist's Perspective on NFTs

In this episode. Yohei Nakajima https://yoheinakajima.com/, a General Partner at Untapped Capital https://www.untapped.vc/about and the creatpr of PixelBeasts https://www.pixelbeasts.xyz/, discusses his work in the NFT space. He begins by describing his experiences as a venture capitalist. He explains how he became interested in NFTs and began creating his own NFT projects. He discusses how he decided to create the PixelBeasts NFT project, and how the project developed over time. He reflects on what he learned creating the project, and how it has inflected his understanding of the NFT space. And he discusses how he sees the NFT space developing in the future. Nakajima is on Twitter at @yoheinakajima https://twitter.com/yoheinakajima. This episode was hosted by Brian L. Frye http://law.uky.edu/directory/brian-l-frye, Spears-Gilbert Professor of Law at the University of Kentucky College of Law. Frye is on Twitter at @brianlfrye https://twitter.com/brianlfrye. * See acast.com/privacy https://acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

38m
Nov 19, 2021
NFT Notes 13: Thibault Schrepel on Blockchain + Antitrust & NFTs

In this episode, Thibault Schrepel https://thibaultschrepel.com/en/, Associate Professor of Law at VU Amsterdam, discusses his new book "Blockchain + Antitrust https://www.e-elgar.com/shop/usd/blockchain-antitrust-9781800885523.html The Decentralization Formula https://www.e-elgar.com/shop/usd/blockchain-antitrust-9781800885523.html," which is published by Edward Elgar, as well as his perspective on NFTs. Schrepel begins by discussing how his study of antitrust law caused him to become interested in blockchain, and why he sees them as complements, rather than antagonists. He explains why regulators should take a light touch when regulating blockchain, in order to preserve its pro-competitive effects, and why participants in blockchain markets should embrace some forms of regulation, while opposing others. He also reflects on the extraordinary growth of the NFT market, how regulators should approach it, and what NFTs might be used for in the future. Schrepel is on Twitter at @LeConcurrential https://twitter.com/LeConcurrential. This episode was hosted by Brian L. Frye http://law.uky.edu/directory/brian-l-frye, Spears-Gilbert Professor of Law at the University of Kentucky College of Law. Frye is on Twitter at @brianlfrye https://twitter.com/brianlfrye. * See acast.com/privacy https://acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

49m
Nov 15, 2021
NFT Notes 12: Waambat on Making Digital Art & Selling NFTs

In this episode, Waambat https://linktr.ee/waambat, a digital artist currently working with NFTs, discusses her experiences in the digital art space. Waambat begins by explaining how she became interested in digital art. She describes some of her early work, and how it was exhibited in a YouTube "biennial" at the Guggenheim Museum. She explains how her work developed over time, and why she immediately saw NFTs as an attractive new model for digital art. She describes her experiences in the NFT market, including her interactions with collectors and other artists. And she reflects on the future of the NFT market as a space for artists. Waambat is on Twitter at @waambat https://twitter.com/waambat. This episode was hosted by Brian L. Frye http://law.uky.edu/directory/brian-l-frye, Spears-Gilbert Professor of Law at the University of Kentucky College of Law. Frye is on Twitter at @brianlfrye https://twitter.com/brianlfrye. * See acast.com/privacy https://acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

34m
Nov 13, 2021
NFT Notes 11: Jason "Artnome" Bailey on the Origins & Future of the NFT Market

In this episode, Jason https://www.linkedin.com/in/jason-bailey-0a899b6/ "Artnome https://www.artnome.com/" Bailey https://nftnow.com/news/jason-bailey-clubnft-prevent-nft-loss/ discusses the emergence of the NFT market and his role in its development. He begins by describing the origins of his interest in art, and specifically in digital art. He discusses his involvement in digital and generative art, and his creation of the artnome.com https://www.artnome.com/ platform for art analytics. He explains how artnome led to his interest in NFTs and how the NFT market emerged in 2017 and 2018. He describes the rapid growth of the NFT market, and the ways he has engaged with it, through projects like Green NFTs https://www.artnome.com/greennfts and the new Club NFT https://www.clubnft.com/ platform. He reflects on why NFTs are important and how they are reshaping how we think about art and the art market. And he speculates about the future of the NFT market. Bailey is on Twitter at @artnome https://twitter.com/artnome. This episode was hosted by Brian L. Frye http://law.uky.edu/directory/brian-l-frye, Spears-Gilbert Professor of Law at the University of Kentucky College of Law. Frye is on Twitter at @brianlfrye https://twitter.com/brianlfrye. * See acast.com/privacy https://acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

1h 1m
Nov 13, 2021
NFT Notes 10: Kelani Nichole on Digital Art in the NFT Space

In this episode, Kelani Nichole https://kelaninichole.com/, the founder of Transfer Gallery http://transfergallery.com/about/, discusses the history of digital art and how digital artists have interacted with the NFT space. She begins by briefly describing the long history of digital art and her own involvement in the curation of digital art, including at Transfer Gallery. She reflects on how the rapid growth of the NFT market has dramatically increased interest in digital art, both historical and contemporary. She explains how she approaches the curation of digital art in light of NFTs, and how she has helped artists negotiate their relationship to NFTs. She reflects on how NFTs fail to reflect or support some of the concerns about meaning and control that are important to many artists. And she discusses the future of digital art. Nichole is on Twitter at @KelaniNichole https://twitter.com/KelaniNichole. This episode was hosted by Brian L. Frye http://law.uky.edu/directory/brian-l-frye, Spears-Gilbert Professor of Law at the University of Kentucky College of Law. Frye is on Twitter at @brianlfrye https://twitter.com/brianlfrye. * See acast.com/privacy https://acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

44m
Nov 13, 2021
NFT Notes 9: Trent Elmore on Decentralized Finance & Digital Art

In this episode, Trent Elmore https://www.linkedin.com/in/trentelmore/, a co-founder of JPG https://jpg.space/, the New Media Curation Protocol, discusses his work in decentralized finance and NFTs. Elmore begins by explaining his interest in art and background in advertising and decentralized finance. Among other things, he discusses YAM Finance and other decentralized finance projects he created and developed. He explains how he became interested in NFTs and his role in the creation of JPG. He discusses on the rapid growth of the NFT market and how he expects NFTs to be used in the future. And he reflects on why some people have such a negative reaction to NFTs and the NFT market. Elmore is on Twitter at @_trente_ https://twitter.com/_trente_. This episode was hosted by Brian L. Frye http://law.uky.edu/directory/brian-l-frye, Spears-Gilbert Professor of Law at the University of Kentucky College of Law. Frye is on Twitter at @brianlfrye https://twitter.com/brianlfrye. * See acast.com/privacy https://acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

46m
Nov 13, 2021
NFT Notes 8: Adam McBride on NFT Archaeology

In this episode, Adam McBride https://www.adammcbride.com/, a popular podcaster and self-described "NFT archaeologist," among many other things, discusses his book "NFT Ape https://nftapebook.com/," how he became interested in NFTs, and how he sees the market for NFTs. McBride begins by describing his early interest in cryptocurrency and how his interest shifted to NFTs. He explains why early NFT projects are especially desirable, and describes how he discovered some of those projects and helped bring them to market. He reflects on what people find compelling about particular NFT projects and where he expects the NFT market to go in the future. And he discusses his new book, "NFT Ape https://www.amazon.com/NFT-APE-Journey-Crypto-Future-ebook/dp/B09KCNCX2W/ref=sr_1_1?dchild=1&qid=1635545265&refinements=p_27%3AAdam%20McBride&s=digital-text&sr=1-1&text=Adam%20McBride," which is available on Amazon. McBride podcasts at The Adam McBride Show https://anchor.fm/costarica and is on Twitter at @adamamcbride https://twitter.com/adamamcbride. This episode was hosted by Brian L. Frye http://law.uky.edu/directory/brian-l-frye, Spears-Gilbert Professor of Law at the University of Kentucky College of Law. Frye is on Twitter at @brianlfrye https://twitter.com/brianlfrye. * See acast.com/privacy https://acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

57m
Nov 06, 2021
NFT Notes 7: Kevin McCoy on the Invention of NFTs

In this episode, Kevin https://mccoyspace.com/ McCoy https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Jennifer_%26_Kevin_McCoy, a pioneering digital artist and Associate Professor https://steinhardt.nyu.edu/people/kevin-mccoy in the Department of Art and Art Professions at New York University, discusses his work on cryptographic art, in.collaboration with Jennifer McCoy. McCoy begins by describing his artistic practice and the origins of his interest in cryptographic art and the blockchain. He explains how he conceived of using the Namecoin blockchain to create a token pointing to a particular artwork in 2013, and demonstrated the creation of such a token in 2014. He describes the initial reception of that project and the first such token he created, which was titled "Quantum https://mccoyspace.com/exhibition/180/," and reflects on how perceptions of the project changed over time. He also explains why he thinks tokens are a transformational technology, and identifies areas in which he expects them to play an important role. McCoy is on Twitter at @mccoyspace https://twitter.com/mccoyspace. This episode was hosted by Brian L. Frye http://law.uky.edu/directory/brian-l-frye, Spears-Gilbert Professor of Law at the University of Kentucky College of Law. Frye is on Twitter at @brianlfrye https://twitter.com/brianlfrye. * See acast.com/privacy https://acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

49m
Oct 29, 2021
NFT Notes 6: Abraham Sutherland on the Reporting of Cryptocurrency & NFT Transactions

In this episode, Abraham https://www.law.virginia.edu/faculty/adjunct-profile/jas4qe/2459391 Sutherland https://www.linkedin.com/in/abraham-sutherland-085b551/, an independent lawyer working in the crypto space, discusses the taxation and reporting of cryptographic assets, specifically the pending proposal to require the reporting of transactions in digital assets valued in excess of $10,000. In his essay, "The Proposal to Regulate Digital Asset Transactions Should Be Struck https://www.taxnotes.com/featured-analysis/proposal-regulate-digital-asset-transactions-should-be-struck/2021/08/13/775gf," published in TaxNotes, Sutherland argues that the extension of rules governing cash transaction to transactions in all digital assets is unworkable and nonsensical. He explains why it would have undesirable consequence, and would be practically impossible for taxpayers to satisfy. In addition, Sutherland announces my receipt of the 2004 Law & Aesthetics Creative Writing Award in the form of an NFT, and discusses the tax and reporting implications of my award. This episode was hosted by Brian L. Frye http://law.uky.edu/directory/brian-l-frye, Spears-Gilbert Professor of Law at the University of Kentucky College of Law. Frye is on Twitter at @brianlfrye https://twitter.com/brianlfrye. * See acast.com/privacy https://acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

31m
Oct 28, 2021
NFT Notes 5: Mitchell F. Chan on Conceptualizing the Blockchain

In this episode, Mitchell F. Chan https://chan.gallery/, a prominent conceptual artist, describes his experiences creating conceptual art on the blockchain and reflects on why it is such a perfect medium for a conceptual art practice. Chan begins by explaining how he made the transition from creating works of conceptual art as large-scale installations into creating them on the blockchain. He describes how he decided in 2017 to translate Yves Klein's pioneering work of conceptual art "Zones of Immaterial Pictorial Sensibility" into an entirely new work that existed as a function of the blockchain and commentary on the relation between the art experience and art object: "Digital Zones of Immaterial Pictorial Sensibility https://chan.gallery/ikb/." He reflects on the initial reception of that work, and how it came to be seen as a pioneering work of blockchain art. Among other things, he discusses his "Blue Paper https://ipfs.io/ipfs/QmcdKPjcJgYX2k7weqZLoKjHqB9tWxEV5oKBcPV6L8b5dD" essay explaining the work. He also reflects on his more recent work, and on the future of NFTs. Chan is on Twitter at @mitchellfchan https://twitter.com/mitchellfchan. This episode was hosted by Brian L. Frye http://law.uky.edu/directory/brian-l-frye, Spears-Gilbert Professor of Law at the University of Kentucky College of Law. Frye is on Twitter at @brianlfrye https://twitter.com/brianlfrye. * See acast.com/privacy https://acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

51m
Oct 28, 2021
NFT Notes 4: Steve Pikelny on How to Make It as a Crypto Artist

In this episode, Steve Pikelny https://steviep.xyz/, Internationally famous crypto artist, Jesus pamphlet collector, and CEO, CFO, CTO, COO of FastCashMoneyPlus.biz http://fastcashmoneyplus.biz/, discusses the secrets of how to make it as a crypto artist. Pikelny begins by discussing his work as an internet artist, creating websites hosting conceptual artworks informed by his experience in the financial services industry. He explains how he got interested in the nascent NFT market, and his experience working with artblocks.io https://www.artblocks.io/. He also describes some of his new projects, and reflects on the future of NFTs. Pikelny is on Twitter at @steviepxyz https://twitter.com/steviepxyz. This episode was hosted by Brian L. Frye http://law.uky.edu/directory/brian-l-frye, Spears-Gilbert Professor of Law at the University of Kentucky College of Law. Frye is on Twitter at @brianlfrye https://twitter.com/brianlfrye. * See acast.com/privacy https://acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

48m
Oct 28, 2021
NFT Notes 3: Sam Hart on Conceptual Art, the Blockchain & NFTs

In this episode, Sam Hart https://hxrts.com/, a researcher, organizer, and curator working in various capacities at the Interchain Foundation https://twitter.com/interchain_io and Other Internet https://twitter.com/otherinternet__, discusses the development of the blockchain as a medium for conceptual art and his role as an article, curator, and theorist in that space. Hart begins by describing his background in technology and conceptual art, and how his interest in blockchain developed in relation to the Occupy Wall Street movement. He reflects on how blockchain helps enable new forms of organizations, including "decentralized autonomous organizations" or DAOs. He discusses the early history of blockchain art, including his own work in that space. And he reflects on the future of the space. Hart is on Twitter at @hxrts https://twitter.com/hxrts. This episode was hosted by Brian L. Frye http://law.uky.edu/directory/brian-l-frye, Spears-Gilbert Professor of Law at the University of Kentucky College of Law. Frye is on Twitter at @brianlfrye https://twitter.com/brianlfrye. * See acast.com/privacy https://acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

1h 1m
Oct 28, 2021
NFT Notes 2: Charles Colman on the Law of Crypto & NFTs

In this episode, Charles Colman https://www.linkedin.com/in/chuckcolman/, a lawyer and legal scholar turned crypto investor and legal strategist discusses his path to crypto investing and his thoughts on the dynamics of the NFT ecosystem. Colman begins by explaining how he became interested in and learned about cryptocurrencies and the NFT sector. He reflects on what he sees as some of the most important legal questions in the space, with a focus on regulation. He discusses how NFTs work and why people are interested in them. And he reflects on the possible futures of the NFT marketplace. Colman is on Twitter at @CColmanLaw https://twitter.com/CColmanLaw and @blawgchain https://twitter.com/blawgchain. This episode was hosted by Brian L. Frye http://law.uky.edu/directory/brian-l-frye, Spears-Gilbert Professor of Law at the University of Kentucky College of Law. Frye is on Twitter at @brianlfrye https://twitter.com/brianlfrye. * See acast.com/privacy https://acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

47m
Oct 23, 2021
Simon Indelicate on the Art & Economics of Musicianship

In this episode, Simon https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Indelicates Indelicate https://www.indelicates.com/, a member of the English band The Indelicates, among other things, discusses his new albums https://www.indelicates.com/arcadia/ and , as well as his essay "Why Your Music is Worthless (and How to Sell it Anyway) https://www.indelicates.com/worthless/." Indelicate begins by describing the inspiration for and process of creating and . He then explains how his essay "Why Your Music is Worthless (and How to Sell it Anyway)" grew out of his experience of the music industry and observations about how it was changing. The essay explains why music is no longer scarce, and how that fundamentally changed the economics of making and selling music. And he reflects on how writing the essay and putting it into practice has informed his subsequent career. Indelicate is on Twitter at @simonindelicate https://twitter.com/simonindelicate. This episode was hosted by Brian L. Frye http://law.uky.edu/directory/brian-l-frye, Spears-Gilbert Professor of Law at the University of Kentucky College of Law. Frye is on Twitter at @brianlfrye https://twitter.com/brianlfrye. * See acast.com/privacy https://acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

47m
Oct 23, 2021
NFT Notes 1: Sam Spike on Curating on the Blockchain

This is part of a series of episodes featuring prominent figures in the NFT and blockchain communities. In this episode, Sam Spike https://twitter.com/_samspike_, a co-founder of JPG: The New Media Curation Protocol https://jpg.space/ and a curator on FingerprintsDAO https://www.fingerprintsdao.xyz/, discusses his work collecting and curating NFT-based art. He begins by describing how he made the transition from studying historical conceptual art to curating conceptual art NFTs. He explains how JPG enables anyone to curate "playlists" of NFT art. He describes the mission the FingerprintsDAO and the nature of the work it collects. And he reflects on the near future of art on the blockchain. Spike is on Twitter at @_samspike_ https://twitter.com/_samspike_. This episode was hosted by Brian L. Frye http://law.uky.edu/directory/brian-l-frye, Spears-Gilbert Professor of Law at the University of Kentucky College of Law. Frye is on Twitter at @brianlfrye https://twitter.com/brianlfrye. * See acast.com/privacy https://acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

43m
Oct 22, 2021