Nine To Noon

RNZ

About

From nine to noon every weekday, Kathryn Ryan talks to the people driving the news - in New Zealand and around the world. Delve beneath the headlines to find out the real story, listen to Nine to Noon's expert commentators and reviewers and catch up with the latest lifestyle trends on this award-winning programme.

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2576 episodes

The week that was

Comedians Te Radar and James Elliott with some of the lighter stories including how a burnt cheese roll impacted a provincial rugby match.

10m
Aug 18
Sports commentator Dana Johannsen

Sport correspondent Dana Johannsen talks to Kathryn about whether debate on the All Blacks rugby coach will die down, now that Ian Foster will be retained as All Blacks coach through to the 2023 World Cup. Also it's crunch time for the Black Ferns, playing their final two tests before the World Cup. And can Tiger Woods save the PGA Tour?. Dana Johannsen is Stuff's National Correspondent specialising in sport.

11m
Aug 18
Book review: Worn - A People's History of Clothing by Sofi Than

Stella Chrysostomou of VOLUME Books reviews Worn: A People's History of Clothing by Sofi Thanhauser, published by Allen Lane - Penguin Random House NZ

7m
Aug 18
Australian tech entrepreneur David Shein shares his recipe for success

Tech entrpreneur David Shein has has extraordinary business success in Australia. He migrated there from South Africa in 1986, where he founded and built up Comtec Communications into Australia's largest network integration company with 1400 staff. 14 years later, he sold the business for just over $1 billion - becoming the first Australian so-called "unicorn" - a privately owned start up valued by shareholders at over $1 billion. Since then he's become a start-up mentor and venture capitalist, helping other entrepreneurs get started. David Shein has just published a book - called The Dumbest Guy at the Table - all proceeds go to the mental health organisation Black Dog Institute. He talks with Kathryn about what he's learned through his career.

27m
Aug 18
Asia correspondent Ed White

China has embarked on a new round of military manoeuvres around Taiwan this week, reacting to the visit of another US congressional delegation, a move that ratchets up Beijing's efforts to isolate the island. And prosecutors in Tokyo have made a series of arrests after a summer of raids on organisations and individuals suspected of giving and receiving bribes during the preparations for the Tokyo 2020 Olympic Games. Ed White is a correspondent with the Financial Times.

8m
Aug 18
More evacuations can't be ruled out in flood-soaked Nelson

The rain has eased in Nelson but the flooding emergency is far from over and another round of heavy rain is set to come in later today. 411 homes have now been evacuated with some residents forced to leave their homes overnight. People are being asked to conserve water due to damage to the main pipe, roads are closed and thousands are without power. Rain-soaked hillsides have given way with slips continuing to threaten many properties. Nelson MP Rachel Boyack was with Emergency Management Minister Kieran McAnulty yesterday as they toured flooded areas to survey the damage. She talks to Kathryn about the situation facing residents today and the recovery ahead.

7m
Aug 18
Sweeping climate moves by capital's regional councils

Wellington's regional council has unanimously backed a proposal to set a binding emissions target and, if passed, will become the first regional council to do so. It's new Regional Policy Statement was voted on yesterday and is out for consultation now. On Monday, Auckland Council released an ambitious proposal to reduce the city's transport emissions by two thirds over the next eight years. If the Wellington region plan is passed, it will see more so-called 15 minute suburbs, where everything you need is a 15 minute walk away, with more dedicated space for walking and biking. Developers seeking to build large greenfield subdivisions will have to show no increase to emissions, and councils in the region will need to align their district plans with the new RPS. Thomas Nash is the chair of the Greater Wellington Regional Council Climate Committee.

17m
Aug 18
Film & TV: Good Luck To You Leo Grande, Bad Sisters, Five Days at Memorial

Film and TV correspondent James Croot looks at Emma Thompson's new film Good Luck to You Leo Grande, which is out in cinemas today. You can listen to Nine to Noon's interview about the movie here. And Apple TV has two new offerings: Bad Sisters and a haunting look at the aftermath of Hurricane Katrina: Five Days at Memorial.

10m
Aug 17
Parenting: Dealing with Whining, Fighting, Meltdowns

Julie King and Joanna Faber are the co-author of books aimed at helping parents communicate well with their children, from pre schoolers to teens. Their previous survival guide to life with children aged 2 to 7 has been translated into 22 languages, they also have a companion app HOW TO TALK: Parenting Tips in Your Pocket, and the app Parenting Hero. Their new collaboration is the book How To Talk When Kids Won't Listen: Whining, Fighting, Meltdowns, Defiance, & other Challenges of Childhood. There's a delightful quote at the beginning of their book - which will resonate with parents and caregivers "Before I became a parent, I didn't know I could ruin someone's day by asking them to put pants on."

20m
Aug 17
Tech: AI sentience, self-drive cars v kids, cameras and phone use

Technology correspondent Mahsa Mohaghegh looks at artificial intelligence use in natural language processing and how close it is to being sentient. She'll also look at how safe pedestrians are from self-driving cars after a campaign group claimed the software was potentially lethal to children. Cameras are being used to detect errant mobile users while driving and the first female-led hackathon is due to be held next month.

13m
Aug 17
Book review: Bolla by Pajtim Statovci

Ralph McAllister reviews Bolla by Pajtim Statovci, published by Allen and Unwin. [picture id="4LN5Z9Z_Bolla_cover_jpg" crop="16x10" layout="full"]

4m
Aug 17
A Nazi or a KGB agent? Linda Kinstler's search for her grandfather

Journalist Linda Kinstler grew up not knowing much about her Latvian grandfather, other than he'd disappeared after World War Two. It was only later, as an adult, that she learned her paternal grandfather, Boris Kinstler, had been a Nazi collaborator and member of the SS in Latvia. After the war, he became a KGB agent, and then vanished. In search of answers about her grandfather, Linda Kinstler uncovers his links to a man called Herbert Cukurs, known as the "Butcher of Riga", implicated in the murder of 30,000 Jews in Latvia. In researching her book, Come to This Court and Cry: How the Holocaust Ends, she unravels a tale of revisionism, ultra-nationalism and denialism - issues that are just as timely as ever.

23m
Aug 17
Severe flooding in Nelson, more rain to come

Kathryn gets an update from Tasman Region Civil Defence Emergency Management group controller Alec Louverdis about the situation in Nelson, where 233 homes have been evacuated and a state of emergency declared after the Maitai River burst its banks yesterday afternoon.

7m
Aug 17
UK correspondent Harriet Line

New figures show inflation rose 10.1 percent in July, the highest in more than 40 years. The spike in inflation is largely down to food prices and staples. It has resulted in the contenders in the Tory leadership race, Rishi Sunak and Liz Truss trading barbs over each other's economic policies. And after weeks of dry, hot weather, heavy rain has brought flash floods across parts of England and sewage pollution warnings at more than 40 beaches and swimming spots in England and Wales.

8m
Aug 17
Rise of Instascams: How to protect your business from being hacked

Falling victim to an online scam is bad enough, but what if someone hijacks your business's social media account, pretends to be you - and then successfully scams other people? It happened to Sarah, who runs a floral business called Print and Petal. She lost control of her Instagram account, and later discovered her followers had been encouraged into click on links for cryptocurrency scams - which some of them did, and lost a lot of money over. Last year Netsafe had almost 15,000 complaints of attacks designed to either harm a computer system or its users. Kathryn speaks with Sarah, and Alastair Miller, Principal Advisory Consultant at Aura Information Security, about the increase in such attacks, where users are vulnerable and why small business owners who rely on social media need to have a plan of what to do if they get hacked.

11m
Aug 17
Evacuated Nelson residents return to assess flood damage

Some Nelson residents evacuated from their homes yesterday due to flooding are returning to look at the damage. 223 homes near the city centre were evacuated yesterday when the Maitai River broke its banks as relentless rain hammered the region. Another ten homes had to be evacuated in the Tahunanui Hills overnight due to a slip. Maggie Gray was one of those evacuated from her Nile Street home yesterday afternoon - she joins Kathryn as she returns to her property to find out how it has fared.

6m
Aug 17
Electricity Authority puts restrictions on very large electricity contracts

The Electricity Authority says very large electricity contracts will only be allowed under certain conditions, under a new interim restriction just announced this morning. The move targets very large, discounted wholesale contracts such as that of the Tiwai Aluminium Smelter - which it says has the potential to make small consumers pay more. Last year the Authority estimated the impact of Tiwai's discounted power, could potentially lead to households paying up to $200 extra on their electricity bills each year. The new restriction will be for nine months, while a proposed permanent amendment is consulted on. Kathryn speaks with the Electricity Authority's Chief Executive James Stevenson-Wallace.

9m
Aug 17
Is inflation on the turn?

The Reserve Bank hiked interest rates once again yesterday - taking the official cash rate up half a percet to 3 percent - part of its agressive campaign to tackle inflation which has hit a 30 year high. The central bank says higher interest rates are needed to cool the economy, the strong rise in wages and other domestic cost pressures. It also signalled two more hikes to come, in October and November, topping out at four per cent. So is inflation on the turn? And what is the liklihood of a recession as things stand? Kathryn speaks with economist and head of research at the BNZ bank, Stephen Toplis.

16m
Aug 17
Law: How the consent defence is used in child cases

In the legal slot today we look at how consent can be used as a defence by someone accused of serious sexual offending against a child. In a recent case in Auckland, a man was found guilty of the rape of a 12-year-old he had claimed pursued him for sex. It's something victims' advocacy groups believe need to be changed. To explain how the law works, Kathryn is joined by Paulette Benton-Grieg, who's a senior lecturer in law at AUT and has worked in the areas of domestic and sexual violence.

11m
Aug 16
Hundertwasser's 30 year love affair with Aotearoa

Friedensreich Hundertwasser was an artist, architect, environmentalist and intellectual, born in Vienna but for whom New Zealand was home for 30 years. He is best known for the unique public toilets in Kawakawa, and now the Hundertwasser Art Centre in Whangarei - opened 22 years after his death. Hundertwasser called New Zealand "the promised land" and his deams began early, when his mother would tell him stories as they hid from the Nazis in Second World War Vienna. A new book on Hundertwasser's life and work has just been released - written by Austrian artist, historian and curator Andreas Hirsh. The book was initiated by the Hundertwasser Foundation in Vienna in collaboration with the Hundertwasser Art Centre in Whangarei.

20m
Aug 16
Book review: Diana, William and Harry, by James Patterso​n

Gina Rogers reviews Diana, William and Harry by James Patterson, published by Penguin Random House NZ

5m
Aug 16
Heavy rain hits Golden Bay, fears for high tide

A red MetService warning is in place for Buller and Westland, and a state of emergency has been declared in Westland. Further north, orange level warnings are in place for the Tasman, Marlborough and Nelson regions. Flooding in Golden Bay is leaving some residents stranded, as roads become impassable, and there is concern for river levels once high tide arrives this afternoon. Collingwood has had 100mm of rain in the last 5 hours, with up to 30mm per hour. Kathryn hears more about the flooding in Golden Bay from Wayne Langford, a farmer in Takaka.

4m
Aug 16
Australian author Jessie Cole on her new book

Desire : A Reckoning is Jessie Cole's deeply personal second memoir. She examines her own experiences of longing, seeking answers on how and why women desire, and how external forces, and upbringing, affect our personal relationships. Her previous memoir Staying was about her surviving the suicide of loved ones, and finding a place to heal. She also writes about how climate change and natural disaster are woven throughout her life.

26m
Aug 16
Australia: Fallout continues over Scott Morrison's mystery ministries

Australia correspondent Annika Smethurst joins Kathryn to talk about the bombshell revelation that former Prime Minister Scott Morrison had himself sworn in as Minister on a number of portfolios - without the knowledge of the Ministers themselves. There's now mounting pressure on him to resign as an MP. Victoria has become the first state to start treaty negotiations with indigenous Australians...and concern the country is in the grip of a "civic crisis" as people pull out of volunteering.

9m
Aug 16
Neurodiversity - unlocking the causes and dispelling the myths

We are all wired differently. Dyslexia, dyscalculia, ADHD and autism spectrum conditions are all variations that can exist in our brains. Researchers are trying to gain a better understanding of the causes of neurodiversity through looking at genetic and environmental factors along with new scanning techniques which allow them to watch the brain at work. Professor Karen Waldie from Auckland University's School of Psychology and Centre for Brain Research is one of those leading the charge. She speaks to Kathryn about what we are learning about neurodiversity and what the education system can do to better support neurodiverse kids in the classroom.

18m
Aug 16
New agency goes into bat for consumers over their power bills

Last week's cold snap had many around the country reaching to turn up the heat - putting pressure on the national grid and household power bills. Those higher bills are of great interest to the Consumer Advocacy Council - born out of a recommendation from the Electricity Price Review, which looked into how the market was working for residential consumers. Deborah Hart is chair of the Council - which has recently held its first board meeting. She joins Kathryn to talk about what the Council will be focused on.

10m
Aug 16
Emergency operation in full swing on West Coast as rain pours down

The rain is pouring down on the West Coast and at the top of the South - with real fears about what's to come. A state of emegency is in place on the West Coast with 'red' severe weather warnings for Buller and Westland. Further north, emergency operations are gearing up at the top of the South Island, with orange level warnings in place in the Tasman, Marlborough and Nelson regions. In Golden Bay, rivers reached alarm levels early this morning - an emergency operation centre has opened as the region prepares for expected flooding and road closures. The heaviest rain so far has been at Franz Josef where a close watch is being kept on the Waiho River. Andy Thompson from West Coast Civil Defence tells Kathryn rivers are already swollen and fears of serious flooding are mounting.

7m
Aug 16
Media commentator Andrew Holden

Andrew talks to Kathryn about Today FM host Tova O'Brien travelling to Ukraine for an extensive interview with President Zelenskyy and how it was funded. His marriage might be over, but Rupert Murdoch's doing ok. His company News Corp's annual profits have jumped by a third to a US $1.67 billion. And there's been glacial progress for most of NZ media in negotiating with Google and Meta for additional revenue.

8m
Aug 15
Creating native topiaries with Xanthe White

Landscape gardener Xanthe White says the compact nature of topiaries can be put to good use to create space in even a small garden for natives.

14m
Aug 15
Business commentator Pattrick Smellie : worker shortages and Te Pūkenga woes

Pattrick talks to the Kathryn about the staff hiring issues for a range of businesses desperate to hire people and fearing a recession. The often asked question is Why can't I hire anyone?. So where have all the workers gone?. Also the latest on the deficit ridden mega-polytech, Te Pukenga, which has just published its new transition plan.

23m
Aug 15