The Daily

The New York Times

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This is what the news should sound like. The biggest stories of our time, told by the best journalists in the world. Hosted by Michael Barbaro and Sabrina Tavernise. Twenty minutes a day, five days a week, ready by 6 a.m.

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1599 episodes

The Sunday Read: ‘How One Restaurateur Transformed America’s Energy Industry’

It was a long-shot bet on liquid natural gas, but it paid off handsomely — and turned the United States into a leading fossil-fuel exporter. The journalist Jake Bittle delves into the storied career of Charif Souki, the Lebanese American entrepreneur whose aptitude for risk changed the course of the American energy business. The article outlines how Mr. Souki rose from being a Los Angeles restaurant owner to becoming the co-founder and chief executive of Cheniere Energy, an oil and gas company that specialized in liquefied natural gas, and provides an insight into his thought process: “As Souki sees it,” Mr. Bittle writes, “the need to provide the world with energy in the short term outweighs the long-term demand of acting on carbon emissions.” In a time of acute climate anxiety, Mr. Souki’s rationale could strike some as outdated, even brazen. The world may be facing energy and climate crises, Mr. Souki told The New York Times, “but one is going to happen this month, and the other one is going to happen in 40 years.” “If you tell somebody, ‘You are going to run out of electricity this month,’ and then you talk to the same person about what’s going to happen in 40 years,” he said, “they will tell you, ‘What do I care about 40 years from now?’” https://www.audm.com/?utm_source=nytmag&utm_medium=embed&utm_campaign=age_old_question_jabr  

30m
Aug 14
Boy Scouts vs. Girl Scouts

Five years ago, after decades of resistance, the Boy Scouts of America made a momentous change, allowing girls to participate. Since then, tens of thousands have joined. Today we revisit a story, first aired in 2017, about 10-year-old twins deciding which group to join, and find out what’s happened to them since. Background reading:  __ __ For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily http://nytimes.com/thedaily?smid=pc-thedaily. Transcripts of each episode will be made available by the next workday. 

28m
Aug 12
Pregnant at 16

With the end of Roe v. Wade, Louisiana has become one of the most difficult places in the United States to get an abortion. The barriers are expected to disproportionately affect Black women, the largest group to get abortions in the state. Today, we speak to Tara Wicker and Lakeesha Harris, two women in Louisiana whose lives led them to very different positions in the fight over abortion access. Background reading:  __ __ For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily http://nytimes.com/thedaily?smid=pc-thedaily. Transcripts of each episode will be made available by the next workday. 

53m
Aug 11
The F.B.I. Search of Trump’s Home

On Monday, federal agents descended on Mar-a-Lago, the private club and Florida home of former President Donald J. Trump, reportedly looking for classified documents and presidential papers. Trump supporters expressed outrage about the agency’s actions, while many Democrats reacted with glee. But what do we know about the search, and what comes next? Guest: Maggie Haberman https://www.nytimes.com/by/maggie-haberman?smid=pc-thedaily, a White House correspondent for The New York Times. Background reading:  __ __ For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily http://nytimes.com/thedaily?smid=pc-thedaily. Transcripts of each episode will be made available by the next workday. 

21m
Aug 10
How Democrats Salvaged a History-Making Bill

This weekend, Democrats passed legislation that would make historic investments to fight climate change and lower the cost of prescription drugs — paid for by raising taxes on businesses. How did the party finally make progress on the bill, and what effects will it have? Guest: Emily Cochrane https://www.nytimes.com/by/emily-cochrane, a Washington-based correspondent for The New York Times. Background reading:  __ __ For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily http://nytimes.com/thedaily?smid=pc-thedaily. Transcripts of each episode will be made available by the next workday. 

28m
Aug 09
The Alex Jones Verdict and the Fight Against Disinformation

In a landmark ruling, a jury in Texas ordered Alex Jones, America’s most prominent conspiracy theorist, to pay millions of dollars to the parents of a boy killed at Sandy Hook for the damage caused by his lies about the mass shooting. What is the significance of the trial, and will it do anything to change the world of lies and misinformation? Guest: Elizabeth Williamson https://www.nytimes.com/by/elizabeth-williamson?smid=pc-thedaily, a feature writer based in the Washington bureau of The New York Times. Background reading:  __ __ For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily http://nytimes.com/thedaily?smid=pc-thedaily. Transcripts of each episode will be made available by the next workday. 

33m
Aug 08
The Sunday Read: 'Why Was Joshua Held for More Than Two Years for Someone Else’s Crimes?'

The more he insisted that his name was Joshua, the more delusional he came to be seen. Journalist Robert Kolker tells us the remarkable story of Joshua Spriestersbach, a homeless man who wound up serving more than two years in a Honolulu jail for crimes committed by someone else. It was a case of mistaken identity that developed into “a slow-motion game of hot potato between the police, the courts, the jails and the hospitals,” Mr. Kolker writes. He delves into how homelessness and mental illness shaped Mr. Spriestersbach’s adult life, two factors that led him into a situation in which he had little control — a bureaucratic wormhole that commandeered and consumed two and a half years of his life. https://www.audm.com/?utm_source=nytmag&utm_medium=embed&utm_campaign=age_old_question_jabr

48m
Aug 07
Vacationing in the Time of Covid

Charles Falls Jr., known as Chillie, loves to take cruises. But Covid, as it has done for so many, left him marooned at home in Virginia. As he told Cristal Duhaime, a producer at the Times podcast First Person, as soon as restrictions eased, he eagerly planned a return to the waves. But for Chillie, who suffers from pulmonary disease, resuming his beloved travels — particularly aboard the cramped quarters of a cruise ship, most people’s idea of a pandemic nightmare — was especially perilous. For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily http://nytimes.com/thedaily?smid=pc-thedaily. Transcripts of each episode will be made available by the next workday. 

30m
Aug 05
How to Interpret the Kansas Referendum on Abortion

Kansas this week became the first U.S. state since the fall of Roe v. Wade to put the question of abortion directly to the electorate. The result was resounding. Voters chose overwhelmingly to preserve abortion rights, an outcome that could have important political reverberations for the rest of the country. Guest: Mitch Smith https://www.nytimes.com/by/mitch-smith?smid=pc-thedaily, a correspondent covering the Midwest and the Great Plains for The New York Times. Want more from The Daily? For one big idea on the news each week from our team, subscribe to our newsletter https://www.nytimes.com/newsletters/the-daily?module=inline.  Background reading:  __ __ For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily http://nytimes.com/thedaily?smid=pc-thedaily. Transcripts of each episode will be made available by the next workday. 

22m
Aug 04
Why Are Democrats Bankrolling Far-Right Candidates?

Democrats are meddling in Republican primaries this year to an unusual degree, attempting to elevate extremist candidates who they think will be easy to defeat in midterms in the fall. Nowhere has that strategy been more divisive than in the election for a House seat in Michigan. Guest: Jonathan Weisman https://www.nytimes.com/by/jonathan-weisman?smid=pc-thedaily, a congressional correspondent for The New York Times. Want more from The Daily? For one big idea on the news each week from our team, subscribe to our newsletter https://www.nytimes.com/newsletters/the-daily?module=inline.  Background reading:  __ __ For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily http://nytimes.com/thedaily?smid=pc-thedaily. Transcripts of each episode will be made available by the next workday. 

28m
Aug 03
The Killing of bin Laden’s Successor

On Monday, President Biden announced that the United States had killed Ayman al-Zawahri in a drone strike in Afghanistan.  Al-Zawahri was the leader of Al Qaeda. A long time number two to Osama bin Laden and the intellectual spine of the terrorist group, he assumed power after bin Laden was killed by U.S. in 2011.  Who was al-Zawahri, and what does his death mean for Afghanistan’s relationship with the United States and for the threat of global terrorism?  Guest: Eric Schmitt https://www.nytimes.com/by/eric-schmitt?smid=pc-thedaily, a senior correspondent covering national security for The New York Times. Want more from The Daily? For one big idea on the news each week from our team, subscribe to our newsletter https://www.nytimes.com/newsletters/the-daily?module=inline.  Background reading:  __ __ For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily http://nytimes.com/thedaily?smid=pc-thedaily. Transcripts of each episode will be made available by the next workday. 

18m
Aug 02
How Monkeypox Went From Containable to Crisis

In mid-June, cases of monkeypox were in the double digits in the United States. There were drug treatments and vaccines against it. There didn’t seem to be any reason for alarm. But in the weeks since, the virus has spread rapidly across the country, with some local and state officials declaring public health emergencies. Guest: Apoorva Mandavilli https://www.nytimes.com/by/apoorva-mandavilli?smid=pc-thedaily, a science and global health reporter for The New York Times. Want more from The Daily? For one big idea on the news each week from our team, subscribe to our newsletter https://www.nytimes.com/newsletters/the-daily?module=inline.  Background reading:  __ __ For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily http://nytimes.com/thedaily?smid=pc-thedaily. Transcripts of each episode will be made available by the next workday. 

24m
Aug 01
The Sunday Read: ‘Inside the Push to Diversify the Book Business’

For generations, America’s major publishers focused almost entirely on white readers. Now a new cadre of executives is trying to open up the industry. The journalist Marcela Valdes spent a year reporting on what she described as “the problematic history of diversity in book publishing and the ways it has affected editors, authors and what you see (or don’t see) in bookstores.” Interviewing more than 50 current and former book professionals, as well as authors, Ms. Valdes learned about the previous unsuccessful attempts to cultivate Black audiences, and considered the intricacies of an industry culture that still struggles to “overcome the clubby, white elitism it was born in.” As one publishing executive puts it, the future of book publishing will be determined not only by its recent hires but also by how it answers this question: Instead of fighting over slices of a shrinking pie, can publishers work to make the readership bigger for everyone? https://www.audm.com/?utm_source=nytmag&utm_medium=embed&utm_campaign=age_old_question_jabr  

1h 8m
Jul 31
The Rise of the Conservative Latina

For decades, Republicans have sought to make gains with a critical voting block: Latinos. Last month, when Mayra Flores was elected to Congress from Texas, she finally showed them a way to gain that support. Today, we explore what her campaign tells us about the future of the Latino vote. Guest: Jennifer Medina https://www.nytimes.com/by/audra-d-s-burch, a national reporter for The New York Times. Want more from The Daily? For one big idea on the news each week from our team, subscribe to our newsletter https://www.nytimes.com/newsletters/the-daily?module=inline.  Background reading:  __ __ For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily http://nytimes.com/thedaily?smid=pc-thedaily. Transcripts of each episode will be made available by the next workday. 

30m
Jul 29
How Expecting Inflation Can Actually Create More Inflation

To fight historic levels of inflation, the Federal Reserve this week, once again, raised interest rates, its most powerful weapon against rising prices. The move was intended to slow demand, but there was also a psychological factor: If consumers become convinced that inflation is a permanent feature of the economy, that might become a self-fulfilling prophecy. Guest: Jeanna Smialek https://www.nytimes.com/by/jeanna-smialek?smid=pc-thedaily, a correspondent covering the Federal Reserve and the economy for The New York Times. Want more from The Daily? For one big idea on the news each week from our team, subscribe to our newsletter https://www.nytimes.com/newsletters/the-daily?module=inline.  Background reading:  __ __ For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily http://nytimes.com/thedaily?smid=pc-thedaily. Transcripts of each episode will be made available by the next workday. 

28m
Jul 28
The Case Against Deshaun Watson

In the past year, more than 20 different women have accused the star N.F.L. quarterback Deshaun Watson of sexual misconduct. Despite the allegations, Watson has signed one of the most lucrative contracts in the history of football, with the Cleveland Browns, and will take the field today for training camp. Guest: Jenny Vrentas https://www.nytimes.com/by/jenny-vrentas?smid=pc-thedaily, a sports reporter for The New York Times. Want more from The Daily? For one big idea on the news each week from our team, subscribe to our newsletter https://www.nytimes.com/newsletters/the-daily?module=inline.  Background reading:  __ __ For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily http://nytimes.com/thedaily?smid=pc-thedaily. Transcripts of each episode will be made available by the next workday. 

32m
Jul 27
How Roe’s Demise Could Safeguard Gay Marriage

After Roe v. Wade was overturned, Democrats introduced a bill to prevent the right to gay marriage from meeting the same fate as the right to abortion. The bill was expected to go nowhere, but it has won more and more Republican support and now seems to have a narrow path to enactment. Guest: Annie Karni https://www.nytimes.com/by/annie-karni, a congressional correspondent for The New York Times. Want more from The Daily? For one big idea on the news each week from our team, subscribe to our newsletter https://www.nytimes.com/newsletters/the-daily?module=inline.  Background reading:  __ __ For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily http://nytimes.com/thedaily?smid=pc-thedaily. Transcripts of each episode will be made available by the next workday. 

26m
Jul 26
Death of a Crypto Company

Born in response to the 2008 financial crisis, cryptocurrency was supposed be a form of money that eliminated the traditional gatekeepers who had overseen the tanking of the economy. But a crash in value recently has raised questions about cryptocurrency’s central promise. Guest: David Yaffe-Bellany https://www.nytimes.com/by/david-yaffe-bellany?smid=pc-thedaily, a reporter covering cryptocurrencies and fintech for The New York Times. Want more from The Daily? For one big idea on the news each week from our team, subscribe to our newsletter https://www.nytimes.com/newsletters/the-daily?module=inline.  Background reading:  __ __ For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily http://nytimes.com/thedaily?smid=pc-thedaily. Transcripts of each episode will be made available by the next workday. 

29m
Jul 25
The Sunday Read: ‘The Books About Sex That Every Family Should Read’

How do you teach your child about sex? It’s a perennial question that has spawned hundreds of illustrated books meant to demystify sexual intercourse. But for the Canadian author Cory Silverberg, there was something lacking. Silverberg, who uses they/them pronouns, felt that books on sex aimed at children often omitted mention of intimacy in the context of disability or gender nonconformity. And so they set about making a book of their own. They wanted to tell a story of how babies are made that would apply to all kinds of children, whether they were conceived the traditional way or through reproductive technologies, whether they live with adoptive or biological parents, and no matter their family configuration. The book critic Elaine Blair, who had also felt that children’s literature on sex was a little thin on inclusivity, recalls being drawn in by the fact that Silverberg’s “Sex is a Funny Word” is one of few children’s books that contend with the fact that children encounter representations of sexuality in the media. Ms. Blair met up with Silverberg in Houston to understand the germ of the idea and the editorial process of delivering the book, from conception to print. https://www.audm.com/?utm_source=nytmag&utm_medium=embed&utm_campaign=age_old_question_jabr  

26m
Jul 24
Utah’s ‘Environmental Nuclear Bomb’

The Great Salt Lake is drying up. Soaring demand for water, exacerbated by drought and higher temperatures in the region, are shrinking the waters, which play such a crucial role in the landscape, ecology and weather of Salt Lake City and Utah. Can the lake be saved? Guest: Christopher Flavelle https://www.nytimes.com/by/christopher-flavelle?smid=pc-thedaily, a climate reporter for The New York Times. Want more from The Daily? For one big idea on the news each week from our team, subscribe to our newsletter https://www.nytimes.com/newsletters/the-daily?module=inline.  Background reading:  __ __ For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily http://nytimes.com/thedaily?smid=pc-thedaily. Transcripts of each episode will be made available by the next workday. 

32m
Jul 22
The Case Against Donald Trump

A series of blockbuster hearings from the Jan. 6 committee has put growing pressure on Attorney General Merrick B. Garland to bring criminal charges against former President Donald J. Trump over the efforts to overturn the 2020 election. Before today’s committee hearing, we speak with Andrew D. Goldstein, one of the prosecutors who led the last major investigation into Mr. Trump, about why winning a case against the former president is such a challenge. Guest: Andrew Goldstein, a federal prosecutor who was part of the Mueller inquiry into Mr. Trump.  Want more from The Daily? For one big idea on the news each week from our team, subscribe to our newsletter https://www.nytimes.com/newsletters/the-daily?module=inline.  Background reading:  __ __ For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily http://nytimes.com/thedaily?smid=pc-thedaily. Transcripts of each episode will be made available by the next workday. 

39m
Jul 21
How Abortion Bans Are Restricting Miscarriage Care

Across the United States, Republicans emboldened by the overturning of Roe v. Wade are passing laws intended to stop medical staff from providing an abortion. But those same laws may also be scaring health workers out of providing basic care for miscarriages. Guest: Pam Belluck https://www.nytimes.com/by/pam-belluck?smid=pc-thedaily, a health and science writer for The New York Times. Want more from The Daily? For one big idea on the news each week from our team, subscribe to our newsletter https://www.nytimes.com/newsletters/the-daily?module=inline.  Background reading:  __ __ For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily http://nytimes.com/thedaily?smid=pc-thedaily. Transcripts of each episode will be made available by the next workday. 

29m
Jul 20
Broken Climate Pledges and Europe’s Heat Wave

A record-breaking heat wave is currently washing over Europe. In parts of Britain, the mercury has hit a freakishly high 100 degrees Fahrenheit or more. While that is happening, both Europe and the United States — two of the world’s largest contributors to global warming — are abandoning key commitments to limit emissions. Guest: SOMINI SENGUPTA https://www.nytimes.com/by/somini-sengupta, the international climate reporter for The New York Times. Want more from The Daily? For one big idea on the news each week from our team, subscribe to our newsletter https://www.nytimes.com/newsletters/the-daily?module=inline.  Background reading:  __ __ For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily http://nytimes.com/thedaily?smid=pc-thedaily. Transcripts of each episode will be made available by the next workday. 

26m
Jul 19
When Biden Met M.B.S.

In the past, President Biden has called Saudi Arabia a “pariah” for its human rights abuses and said that he would never meet with its de facto ruler, Crown Prince Mohammed bin Salman. But Mr. Biden’s first trip as president to the Middle East included talks with the prince. What prompted the change in course? Guest: Ben Hubbard https://www.nytimes.com/by/ben-hubbard?smid=pc-thedaily, the Beirut bureau chief for The New York Times. Want more from The Daily? For one big idea on the news each week from our team, subscribe to our newsletter https://www.nytimes.com/newsletters/the-daily?module=inline.  Background reading:  __ __ For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily http://nytimes.com/thedaily?smid=pc-thedaily. Transcripts of each episode will be made available by the next workday. 

28m
Jul 18
The Sunday Read: ‘Want to Do Less Time? A Prison Consultant Might Be Able to Help.’

People heading to court often turn to the internet for guidance. In so doing, many come across the work of Justin Paperny, who dispenses advice on his YouTube channel. His videos offer preparation advice and help manage expectations, while providing defendants information to be able to hold their current lawyers accountable, and to try to negotiate a lighter sentence. Mr. Paperny, a former financial criminal, also leads White Collar Advice with his partner Michael Santos, another former convict. The firm is made up of 12 convicted felons who each have their own consulting specialty based on where they served time and their own sentencing experiences. The journalist Jack Hitt relates the story of the two men and the details of their firm, which “fills a need in 21st-century America.” It is, Mr. Hitt writes, “a natural market outgrowth of a continuing and profound shift in America’s judicial system.” https://www.audm.com/?utm_source=nytmag&utm_medium=embed&utm_campaign=age_old_question_jabr

43m
Jul 17
A View of the Beginning of Time

Ancient galaxies carpeting the sky like jewels on black velvet. Fledgling stars shining out from deep within cumulus clouds of interstellar dust. Hints of water vapor in the atmosphere of a remote exoplanet. This week, NASA released new images captured from a point in space one million miles from Earth. Today, we discuss the James Webb Space Telescope, the world’s most powerful space observatory, its journey to launch and what it can teach us about the universe. Guest: Kenneth Chang https://www.nytimes.com/by/kenneth-chang, a science reporter for The New York Times. Want more from The Daily? For one big idea on the news each week from our team, subscribe to our newsletter https://www.nytimes.com/newsletters/the-daily?module=inline.  Background reading:  __ __ For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily http://nytimes.com/thedaily?smid=pc-thedaily. Transcripts of each episode will be made available by the next workday. 

29m
Jul 15
How Sri Lanka’s Economy Collapsed

In recent days, the political crisis in Sri Lanka has reached a critical point, with its president fleeing the country and protesters occupying his residence and office. Today, “The Daily” explores how the island nation, whose economy was once held up as a success story in South Asia, came apart — and why it’s a cautionary tale. Guest: Emily Schmall https://www.nytimes.com/by/emily-schmall, a South Asia correspondent for The New York Times. Want more from The Daily? For one big idea on the news each week from our team, subscribe to our newsletter https://www.nytimes.com/newsletters/the-daily?module=inline.  Background reading:  __ __ For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily http://nytimes.com/thedaily?smid=pc-thedaily. Transcripts of each episode will be made available by the next workday. 

27m
Jul 14
Could the Midterms Be Tighter Than Expected?

For months, leaders of the Democratic Party and President Biden have been bracing for huge losses in the upcoming midterm elections. Today, “The Daily” explores a new New York Times poll that complicates that thinking — and could set the stage for a very different showdown in November. Guest: Nate Cohn https://www.nytimes.com/by/nate-cohn, a domestic correspondent for The Upshot at The New York Times. Want more from The Daily? For one big idea on the news each week from our team, subscribe to our newsletter https://www.nytimes.com/newsletters/the-daily?module=inline.  Background reading:  __ __ For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily http://nytimes.com/thedaily?smid=pc-thedaily. Transcripts of each episode will be made available by the next workday. 

26m
Jul 13
Can Elon Musk Get Out of Buying Twitter?

Last week, Elon Musk announced that he was pulling out of his $44 billion agreement to purchase Twitter. Today, we explore why a company that once tried to fend off this acquisition is now trying to force Mr. Musk to buy it. Guest: Kate Conger https://www.nytimes.com/by/kate-conger, a technology reporter for The New York Times. Want more from The Daily? For one big idea on the news each week from our team, subscribe to our newsletter https://www.nytimes.com/newsletters/the-daily?module=inline.  Background reading:  __ __ For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily http://nytimes.com/thedaily?smid=pc-thedaily. Transcripts of each episode will be made available by the next workday. 

23m
Jul 12
On Abortion Laws, It All Goes Back to 2010

When the Supreme Court overturned Roe v. Wade, the court’s conservative majority argued it was simply handing the question of abortion to the states and their voters to decide for themselves. But in reality, the court was ensuring that many states, from Arizona to Ohio, would immediately ban the procedure without much debate, because their legislatures are now dominated by hard-line Republicans. Today, we tell the story of how those Republican legislators achieved that dominance. Guest: Kate Zernike https://www.nytimes.com/by/kate-zernike, a political reporter for The New York Times. Want more from The Daily? For one big idea on the news each week from our team, subscribe to our newsletter https://www.nytimes.com/newsletters/the-daily?module=inline.  Background reading:  __ __ For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily http://nytimes.com/thedaily?smid=pc-thedaily. Transcripts of each episode will be made available by the next workday. 

22m
Jul 11