The Daily Dive

iHeartPodcasts

About

Start your day with The Daily Dive. News without the noise, told straight. Explore the most interesting news of the day. Connect with the writers, analysts and reporters that know the real story. Hosted by Oscar Ramirez in Los Angeles, this 20 minute podcast will be ready for you when you wake up. (Posted by 6 AM EST)

Available on

Community

1570 episodes

Inflation Rate Eases Slightly Driven by Falling Gas Prices

U.S. inflation has eased slightly to 8.5% down from its 40-year high of 9.1%.  Some of the gains have been made up with falling energy and gas prices, but grocery prices are still as concern as they are up 13% from last year.  The Fed has been managing the inflation crisis with adjustments to the key interest rate and meets next month to evaluate.  Gwynn Guilford, economics reporter at the WSJ, joins us for what to know about the latest inflation numbers.   Next, the labor market remains tight despite recession fears and the U.S. added 528,000 jobs in July driven mostly by travel and hospitality sectors.  On the other hand, the tech sector has been dealing with cuts and business is booming for layoff specialists.  These are companies that help businesses with identifying who to layoff, make sure they receive the right amount of severance, and day-of communication plans.  Maxwell Strachan, features writer and editor at Motherboard, joins us for what to know.   Finally, the Covid pandemic has changed just about every aspect of Americans’ health, and it has mostly been for the worse.  As people missed health screenings, abandoned routines, and went through isolation we saw a range of other chronic diseases worsen.  Overall death rates of heart disease and stroke rose, drug overdose deaths and alcohol abuse rose, and even mental health took a hit.  Brianna Abbot, health reporter at the WSJ, joins us for more. See omnystudio.com/listener https://omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

19m
Aug 11
Travel and Hospitality Industries Keep Adding Jobs, but They Still Need More Employees

In this time of high inflation and recession fears the country continues to add more jobs driven by gains in the travel and hospitality industries.  Restaurants, bars and hotels keep hiring people, but they still don’t have enough as pent-up demand for those services remains high. Allison Pohle, reporter at the WSJ, joins us for how many of these industries have recovered almost all of their pre-pandemic jobs.   Next, Amazon recently held an event where they debuted some improvements in their text-to-speech technology and had and AI mimic the voice of someone’s dead grandmother.  What’s amazing is that it’s becoming easier to create these artificially generated voices to sound like anyone and in this case, they only needed about 60 seconds of audio rather than 60 hours.  Adam Bluestein, contributor to Fast Company, joins us for how this is just the beginning for voice cloning.   Finally, craft beer lovers beware!  Brewers are facing a shortage of carbon dioxide and it could cause delays in production.  Breweries rely on CO2 for putting bubbles in the beer itself, but also along the production process to move the beer through lines and purge oxygen from tanks.  Emily Heil, food reporter at the Washington Post, joins us for the latest challenge for craft brewers. See omnystudio.com/listener https://omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

19m
Aug 10
More Americans Are Turing to Food Banks for Help, Inflation Is Making It More Expensive to Feed Them

We are seeing an increase in food insecurity around the country and this time around it is not due to a wave of people losing jobs, rather high inflation has been hitting Americans hard, leading many to seek out help from food banks.  Lora Kelley, business reporter at the NY Times, joins us for how the food banks themselves are struggling to meet demand as they see decreasing donations and increased costs due to paying more for transportation and acquiring food.    Next, despite fears of a recession and record-high inflation, pent-up demand for travel and fun are leading people to Las Vegas.  After sheltering for most of the pandemic, older consumers are returning to the Strip, international travelers are also back, and work and fan conventions are filling up the calendar.  Katherine Sayre, gambling reporter at the WSJ, joins us for how people are feeling lucky as Vegas is still booming.   Finally, American’s urge to spend has not stopped even as prices have increased, and they are whipping out their credit cards and charging it.  There has been a shift in buying physical goods and home items during the pandemic to spending on experiences like travel and entertainment and it’s raising the amount of credit card debt.  Javier David, managing editor for business and markets at Axios, joins us for what to know about soaring credit card debt. See omnystudio.com/listener https://omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

19m
Aug 09
Inflation Reduction Act Passes in the Senate Paving Way for Another Biden Victory

Senate Democrats have passed the Inflation Reduction Act with a 51-50 vote, Vice President Kamala Harris cast the tie-breaking vote.  Democrats say the bill will combat climate change, reduce health care costs, reduce the deficit, and raise taxes on big corporations.  The bill now moves on to the House before it hits Biden’s desk, but the bill also delivers another big win for the president.  Despite some wins however polls still show that Americans are worried about the economy and Biden’s approvals remain low.  Julia Manchester, national political reporter at The Hill, joins us for what to know.   Next, some streaming stars are learning the hard way what the price of online fame can be.  Stars on the video game streaming platform Twitch invite viewers into their homes to hangout, interact with fans and they can gain big followings pretty quickly, but they also have to deal with stalkers and harassment.  While it’s not new that celebrities have had to deal with these difficulties from fans, the intimacy that the streaming relationship allows for just amps it up.  Kellen Browning, tech reporter at the NY Times, joins us for how content creators and streamers are now hoping that platforms put a greater emphasis on personal security. See omnystudio.com/listener https://omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

19m
Aug 08
WEEKEND EDITION- Dum Dum Drop Shipping Scheme and Aging Student Debtors of America

This is a compilation of some of the most compelling stories of the week. See omnystudio.com/listener https://omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

20m
Aug 07
WEEKEND EDITION- Al-Qaeda Leader Killed, Monkeypox National Health Emergency, Myth of Lazy Millennial

This is a compilation of some of the most compelling stories of the week. See omnystudio.com/listener https://omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

19m
Aug 06
U.S. Declares Monkeypox Outbreak National Health Emergency

The U.S. has officially declared the monkeypox outbreak a national health emergency.  This is in addition to various states already declaring their own emergencies.  The designation frees up funds to ramp up vaccination efforts, testing, education, and outreach.  In the meantime, many monkeypox patients feel there is a lack of guidance and have been reporting excruciating pain.  Dominique Mosbergen, medical science reporter at the WSJ, joins us for what to know.   Next, researchers at Yale University have used a new system they created called OrganEx to restore cells in some organs of pigs that had just died.  When blood is no longer pumping through organs the cells begin to die, but with this system, it restored circulation and even repaired some of the damaged cells.  Evan Bush, science reporter at NBC News, joins us for this breakthrough and the ethical questions raised about how medicine defines death.   Finally, Polio is back in the U.S. after being eliminated in 1979.  There was a recent case in an unvaccinated 20-year-old in Rockland County, New York.  What makes this case interesting is that it came from a vaccine derived strain, meaning that it mutated from an oral vaccine that had small amounts of the live virus.  Miranda Dixon-Luinenburg, joins us for this latest case and how it affects the global eradication efforts. See omnystudio.com/listener https://omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

19m
Aug 05
Will Bringing Down Inflation Cause a Big Spike in Unemployment?

As the Fed tries to combat inflation by raising interest rates and cooling down the economy, it risks moving us into a recession and causing a big spike in unemployment.  Now, there is a fight brewing about how big the jump could be or if it will be more of a soft landing like the Fed wants.  As it stands now, there has been a small drop in job openings, but there are still roughly two jobs open for each unemployed worker.  Courtenay Brown, economics reporter at Axios, joins us for the inflation vs. jobs fight.   Next, when it comes to student debt, the fastest-growing demographic of borrowers are those aged sixty-two and older.  Of the forty-five million Americans who have student debt, one in five are over fifty and we have seen their student loan balances increase over 500%.  One example of how bad it can get… a woman took out a $29,000 federal loan in 1983, she is now 91 and owes more than $329,000.  Eleni Schirmer, organizer with the Debt Collective and contributor to The New Yorker, joins us for how more Americans are aging into their debt. See omnystudio.com/listener https://omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

20m
Aug 04
Introducing: Countdown with Keith Olbermann

Hi Daily Dive Listeners - we have a new show we think you'll love.“Countdown With Keith Olbermann,” the landmark news and commentary program that reordered the world of cable news, returns as a daily podcast. Olbermann’s daily news-driven mix will include his trademark “Special Comment” political analysis, the tongue-in-cheek “Worst Persons In The World” segment, and his timeless readings from the works of the immortal James Thurber. The man who turned SportsCenter into a cultural phenomenon will broaden the content to include a daily sports segment, a daily call for help for a suffering dog, and a remarkable series of anecdotes covering a career that stretched from covering the 1980 Olympic Miracle on Ice a month after his 21st birthday, to anchoring the 2009 Presidential Inauguration and the 2009 Super Bowl pre-game show in a span of just twelve days, to rejoining ESPN as a “rookie” baseball play-by-play man at the age of 59. Take a listen to the trailer and, if you want to hear more, find "Countdown with Keith Olbermann" in your listening app of choice and follow/subscribe so you never miss an episode. See omnystudio.com/listener https://omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

1m
Aug 03
Al Qaeda Leader Zawahiri Killed by Drone Strike in Afghanistan

President Biden made the announcement Monday that Al Qaeda leader Ayman al-Zawahiri has been killed by a drone strike in Afghanistan.  The CIA zeroed in on his location by carefully studying the movements of him and his family until Biden authorized a “precise tailored airstrike” with two Hellfire R9X missiles hitting Zawahiri in the balcony of his safe house in Kabul.  Idrees Ali, foreign policy correspondent at Reuters, joins us how the strike happened and the impact it has made on the terrorist network.   Next, a popular side hustle selling Dum Dum lollipops on Amazon is costing the candy company who makes them millions and it’s also violating Amazon’s policy.  People are engaging in drop-shipping and pocketing the profits by looking for products with lower prices than on Amazon, then posting those items on the website, waiting for someone to place an order, and finally purchasing the product from the other retailer and shipping it directly to the customer.  A lot of these methods are also driven by tutorials on YouTube and TikTok.  Spencer Soper, reporter at Bloomberg News, joins us for how it all works. See omnystudio.com/listener https://omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

19m
Aug 03
How Gen Z Helped Disprove the Myth of the Lazy Millennial

Shortly after millennials hit their teens and started getting jobs, their employment numbers plummeted fueling the myth of the lazy millennial.  But now, after looking at the data, it seems like it might not be that they didn’t want jobs, rather they were entering the workforce after two recessions and competing with laid-off, more experienced workers.  Andrew Van Dam, Department of Data columnist at The Washington Post, joins us for what to know.   Next, the nonprofit agency that operates the transplant system is called the United Network for Organ Sharing and according to a recent review, the technology used to match donated organs to patients is in need of a full overhaul.  It has been plagued by aged out software, periodic system failures, and an over-reliance of manually inputting data.  Lenny Bernstein, health and medicine reporter at The Washington Post, joins us for more.   Finally, as the group of people who have not had Covid continues to shrink, many ideas begin to swirl about how they have avoided it for so long.  For some it could be a healthy immune system, masking, or just luck, but could genetics also be at play?  Katherine Wu, staff writer at The Atlantic, joins us for how scientists are looking into whether some are just naturally resistant to the virus. See omnystudio.com/listener https://omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

19m
Aug 02
House Speaker Nancy Pelosi Heads to Asia With No Mention of Visiting Taiwan

This week House Speaker Nancy Pelosi is visiting 4 Asian countries to discuss trade, Covid-19, climate change and security.  Missing notably from her itinerary is whether Pelosi and her delegation would visit Taiwan in what would be the first visit from an American official since 1997.  China has warned of consequences if Pelosi does touch down there because China claims them as their territory.  Julia Manchester, national political reporter at The Hill, joins us for what to know about this, Republicans increasingly courting Latino voters, and Biden testing positive again for Covid-19.   Next, the deadliest road in America is US-19, a stretch of highway in Pasco County, Florida.  The road has three lanes on both sides with extra turn lanes and a speed limit of 45-55 mph making it more like a freeway.  The road was definitely not built with pedestrians in mind as crosswalks are few and far between causing people to often cross where they can to access the businesses and restaurants along the way.  Roads like this are called “stroads” meant to be quick thoroughfares through multiple cities, but also share characteristics with smaller streets, places for people to live, shop, and eat and this combination can be deadly for those on foot.  Marin Cogan, senior correspondent at Vox, joins us for more. See omnystudio.com/listener https://omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

19m
Aug 01
WEEKEND EDITION- Two More HIV Patients Beat Virus, Chicken Nugget Wars, Beyond Meat’s Pepperoni Problems

This is a compilation of some of the most compelling stories of the week. See omnystudio.com/listener https://omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

20m
Jul 31
WEEKEND EDITION- GDP Shrinks Again Prompting Recession Fears, We Were Wrong About Great Resignation, How to Spot Shrinkflation

This is a compilation of some of the most compelling stories of the week. See omnystudio.com/listener https://omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

19m
Jul 30
Economy Shrinks for Second Quarter, Raising Recession Fears

The U.S. economy shrunk for a second quarter putting us on a path closer to a recession.  GDP fell at a rate of 0.9% after a 1.6% decline in the first quarter.  Most of the dip was driven by slower consumer spending and drops in business and residential investment.  Reade Pickert, economy reporter at Bloomberg News, joins us for how we will still need official news from the National Bureau of Economic Research to determine if the recession is here.   Next, as interest rates are rising, companies are calling workers back to the office, and home prices expected to fall, Zoomtowns that drew in remote workers during the pandemic are showing that the housing market is cooling fast.  Boise, Idaho in particular is emblematic of this with its housing market currently overvalued by 69%.  Nicole Friedman, U.S. housing reporter at the WSJ, joins us for what to know as more houses are sitting on the market longer.   Finally, the new battleground for fast-food restaurants is chicken nuggets.  KFC will be testing new nuggets that could replace their popcorn chicken and Boston Market has rolled out their first nuggets that are roasted and not fried.  The industry is looking to boost profits by targeting younger Gen Z customers who love their chicky nuggies.  Jennifer Kingson, chief correspondent at Axios, joins us for the nugget wars. See omnystudio.com/listener https://omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

19m
Jul 29
Two HIV Patients Appear to Have Beaten the Virus

Two HIV patients have joined a very small group of patients who seem to have beaten the virus.  A 66-year-old man who received a transplant of stem cells with a genetic mutation that blocks HIV has no virus in his body and a woman in her 70s that was treated with retroviral drugs and immune boosting therapies is “functionally cured.”  Researchers are hoping that these cases will provide clues to a possible cure in the future.  Betsy McKay, senior writer at the WSJ, joins us for what to know.   Next, let’s talk about all those pandemic impulse buys you may be regretting.  It was a time when everyone had a lot of time on their hands and some extra money, so people bought Peloton bikes, roller skates, bread makers, even new homes or pets, but now that things have returned a little more to normal those things have hit the back burner.  Emily Stewart, senior correspondent at Vox, joins us for pandemic buyer’s remorse.   Finally, high inflation costs have sent businesses searching for new sources of revenue and greener way to deal with waste and it’s leading to some interesting new products.  Think compost made from crabs, vodka distilled from dairy waste, and soap made from bacon grease.  Harriet Torry, reporter at the WSJ, joins us for how customers are reating to inflation’s funky byproducts. See omnystudio.com/listener https://omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

19m
Jul 28
Biden and Democrats Could Finally Be In for Some Wins in Congress

With much of President Biden’s legislative agenda stalled recently he is finally poised for some big wins in Congress.  The first major prescription drug legislation in nearly 20 years and a $50 billion bill to subsidize semiconductor chip manufacturing are two bills that have bipartisan support and appear to be on their way to passing.  Mike DeBonis, congressional reporter at The Washington Post, joins us for how Democrats hope these bills have big political payoffs.   Next, as inflation continues to push prices higher for everyone, businesses are looking to offset their increased costs by making products slightly smaller but keeping the same price.  It’s called shrinkflation, and if you don’t pay close enough attention, you could be missing out.  Laura Daily, contributor to The Washington Post, joins us for how to combat shrinkflation by looking at unit pricing and keeping an eye on tricky labeling.   Finally, the sober-curious movement is making its way into dating and more people are opting to go out without the drinks.  Social norms around drinking on dates have changed and people looking for more authentic connections.  They are also making sure to mention it on their online dating profiles.  Rachel Wolfe, consumer trends reporter at the WSJ, joins us for how younger adults are looking for more creative dates without the booze. See omnystudio.com/listener https://omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

19m
Jul 27
WHO Declares Monkeypox a Global Health Emergency

The WHO has now declared monkeypox a “public health emergency of international concern.”  Cases have continued to rise worldwide and has not necessarily grown out of control, but it has the potential to do so.  Part of this is to also raise awareness for people to know symptoms, warning signs, and look out for guidelines.  Keren Landman, epidemiologist and senior health reporter at Vox, joins us for what to know. Next, many experts may have been wrong about the Great Resignation.  While workers have been quitting and switching jobs to get more power, money and benefits, the big gains have only benefited a select group.  Fears that a recession could be coming also have the potential to make it worse.  Juliana Kaplan, labor and inequality reporter at Business Insider, joins us for more. Finally, the exclusive club of people who have not had Covid continues to shrink.  However, some experts say that most people have been infected even if you didn’t realize it as some 40% of confirmed cases are asymptomatic.  Immunologists are looking into whether exposure to other pathogens or coronaviruses could trigger immune responses before Covid spreads.  Julie Wernau, health and medicine reporter at the WSJ, joins us for those that think they have remained Covid-free. See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

19m
Jul 26
Biden’s Covid Symptoms Improve Significantly and Beyond Meat’s Pepperoni Problem

President Biden is still recovering from Covid-19 as his doctors have said he has improved significantly but still has a sore throat while other symptoms have diminished.  They also said that it is likely that he has the BA.5 Omicron subvariant.  Julia Manchester, national political reporter at The Hill, joins us for a quick health update and what we learned from dueling Trump and Pence rallies in Arizona.  The Republican base still loves the former President as he gears up to run again. Next, Beyond Meat has a pepperoni problem.  It currently has a deal to bring its alt-meat to KFC, Taco Bell and Pizza Hut, but more than a year into its partnership it is struggling to deliver on the new products.  When it comes to the pepperoni, only a small test has been done at select Pizza Hut locations because they kept hitting speed bumps along the way.  The fake pepperoni links are formed in Pennsylvania, flown to Europe to be cooked and sliced, then flown back to the states.  There were even disagreements over the order of cooking and slicing.  Deena Shanker, food reporter at Bloomberg News, joins us for Beyond Meat’s struggles. See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

19m
Jul 25
WEEKEND EDITION- Netflix Loses More Subscribers, Costco Rotisserie Chicken, Uvalde Police Failures

This is a compilation of some of the most compelling stories of the week. See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

19m
Jul 24
WEEKEND EDITION- President Biden Test Positive, Gap in Student Abilities, What It’s Like to Have Monkeypox

This is a compilation of some of the most compelling stories of the week. See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

19m
Jul 23
President Biden Test Positive for Covid-19 as BA.5 Variant Takes Hold of the Country

President Biden has tested positive for Covid-19 despite being vaccinated and double boosted and is experiencing mild symptoms.  The current wave of infections we are seeing are mostly the BA.5 Omicron subvariant and it could be what the Covid normal looks like.  Katherine Wu, staff writer at The Atlantic, joins us for how the endless churn of variants will keep infecting people even if you’re vaccinated or had prior infection. Next, the impact of the pandemic on children has been so uneven that in classrooms across the country we are seeing a wider range of student abilities and it could be harder for those lagging behind to catch up.  A recent study shows that students in grades three to eight showed a larger spread in achievement levels this year compared to 2019.  The gap was 4-8% in reading and 5-10% in math.  Erin Einhorn, national education reporter at NBC News Digital, joins us for what to know. Finally, Costco has two recession-proof items at their stores… the $1.50 hot dog combo and their $4.99 rotisserie chickens.  When it comes to the chicken, Costco has built out its own chicken business contracting with famers to raise their birds, building a feed mill, a hatchery, and slaughter plant.  Kenny Torrella, reporter at Vox, joins us for how the rotisserie chickens are considered a “loss leader” just to get you in the door to buy more stuff. See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

19m
Jul 22
Netflix Loses Almost One Million Subscribers, Still Bad but Better Than Predicted

Many in the entertainment industry had been waiting on numbers from Netflix on how many subscribers they lost in the last quarter. They lost just under one million subscribers instead of the two million they had predicted.  That still leaves a lot of questions on what they can do to stop people from leaving in droves.  Peter Kafka, senior correspondent at Recode, joins us for the big question, is this a Netflix-specific issue or does the entire streaming business have a problem? Next, while the Jan. 6 committee hearings have not made a huge splash in changing peoples minds about former President Trump and his actions around that time, we may be seeing some signs that they are wounding his reputation after all.  The constant drip of negative coverage is causing some Republicans on the margins to reconsider their support for 2024 according to some polls and focus groups.  David Siders, national political correspondent at Politico, joins us for more. Finally, as more companies are resuming normal operations, work conferences are also making a comeback and these professional gatherings are acting as mini vacations for parents who spent the pandemic taking care of their kids while they were out of school.  Alina Dizik, contributor to the WSJ, joins us for how parents are escaping their families by going on work trips. See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

19m
Jul 21
Omicron Subvariant BA.5 Continues to Evade Immunity and Cause More Infections

The Omicron subvariant BA.5 is proving that the pandemic is still not over.  It continues to evade immunity, even from previous omicron infections.  The good news is that death rates are down and hospitals aren’t overwhelmed like before, but the virus is spreading fast again and the small fraction of people getting seriously ill can add up.  Umair Irfan, senior reporter at Vox, joins us for how virus mutations are keeping Omicron in play. Next, all signs point to President Biden running again in 2024, but the one person who weighs most heavily on his decision is former President Trump.  It has set up an almost codependent relationship between the two for the next election.  Rumors are that Trump could declare in September and Biden in April, but there are plenty of considerations yet to be made.  Matt Viser, White House reporter at The Washington Post, joins us for how we could be in store for a presidential rematch. Finally, we’ll tell you how the Brazilian butt lift became one of the deadliest cosmetic surgeries and inadequate regulations make it hard for patients to tell if they are getting a good doctor or not.  One of the things to consider, there is a difference between plastic surgeons, which require years of specialized training and cosmetic surgeons which doctors can call themselves after a few months of training.  Fiona Rutherford, healthcare reporter at Bloomberg News, joins us for what to know. See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

19m
Jul 20
Failures at All Levels in Response to Uvalde Shooting and What It’s Really Like to Have Monkeypox

A committee of the Texas House of Representatives released a preliminary report over the weekend of all the failings in the response to the shooting in Uvalde that led to the death of 19 children and 2 teachers.  The report was all bad news and found problems at every level.  Despite there being almost 400 officers from various agencies, no one took command of the situation, the school itself also didn’t follow safety protocols, and those that knew the shooter missed several warning signs.  Alicia Caldwell, reporter at the WSJ, joins us for how a lack of leadership and communication delayed a confrontation with the gunman. Next, we’ll talk to a man that has gone public with his battle with monkeypox.  He will detail his illness from being notified by phone that he was exposed to the flu-like symptoms and the painful lesions that appeared all over his body.  One of the toughest parts of recovery was the isolation he had to be in while waiting to get better.  His decision to go public about his experience led to a lot of reaction online, most of which was supportive.  Matt Ford, actor, writer and video producer, joins us for what it’s really like to experience monkeypox. See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

19m
Jul 19
Biden Wraps up First Trip to the Middle East With Few Deliverables on Increased Oil Production

President Biden wrapped up his first presidential trip to the Middle East over the weekend with few concrete deliverables on increased oil production from Saudi Arabia and no progress on an Israeli and Palestinian resolution.  Ginger Gibson, deputy Washington digital editor at NBC News, joins us this, Biden’s meeting with the Saudi crowned prince, another round of bad poll numbers, and Sen. Joe Manchin refusing to support the president’s agenda. Next, some restaurants are facing an extortion racket and it’s all playing out on Google.  Emails are being sent to dozens of restaurants threatening bad, one-star reviews unless owners pay up with $75 Google Play gift cards.  These reviews are critical in attracting business and some restaurants are complaining of inaction on the part of Google in policing these negative comments.  Christina Morales, food reporter at the NY Times, joins us for how restaurants are responding. Finally, the battle for the future of American passenger rail is currently being played out.  Amtrak is trying to expand with 39 new routes to reach dozens more cities and towns and it has the money to do so, but it doesn’t have the railroad tracks.  Amtrak contracts with private rail owners because it doesn’t own its own, but the fight to keep freight and the supply chain moving, is taking precedent.  Luz Lazo, reporter at the Washington Post, joins us for what to know in a decision that could come by the end of summer. See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

19m
Jul 18
WEEKEND EDITION- Red States Winning Post-pandemic Economy, College Is Too Expensive Now, Deep Space Pics From James Webb Space Telescope

This is a compilation of some of the most compelling stories of the week. See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

19m
Jul 17
WEEKEND EDITION- 988 New Suicide Prevention Hotline, Twitter Sues Elon Musk, Pig-Heart Transplants May Help Improve Tests for Pig Viruses

This is a compilation of some of the most compelling stories of the week. See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

19m
Jul 16
988 New Suicide Prevention Hotline

The National Suicide Prevention Lifeline is getting an upgrade this weekend (July 16) as it debuts a new three-digit number for calls and texts.  The new number is 988 and the hope is that the shorter number will be more memorable during a crisis.  Underscoring how important the service is, latest numbers show that one in six calls to the hotline go unanswered, so it is more important then ever to get people connected.  Brianna Abbott, health reporter at the WSJ, joins us for what to know about 988, the new National Suicide Prevention Lifeline number. Next, recent news out of the field of xenotransplantation, two brain-dead people has pig hearts transplanted which offered doctors a chance to use new infectious disease protocols designed to help ensure that pig viruses aren’t transmitted to patients.  This is all leading up to plans for the FDA to allow clinical trials for pig organ transplants.  Amy Dockser Marcus, health and science reporter at the WSJ, joins us for more. Finally, another 40-year high, inflation has soared to 9.1%.  Driving the increases have been continued high energy costs, but also rising food and housing costs.  The big challenge is how to curb inflation without causing a recession.  The main tool of the Fed is to keep raising interest rates and they have signaled they will keep doing so.  Rachel Siegal, economics reporter at The Washington Post, joins us for the nation’s most challenging economic problem. See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

19m
Jul 15
Twitter Sues Elon Musk for Backing Out of $44 Billion Deal

Twitter is now suing Elon Musk seeking to enforce the $44 billion deal he made to buy the company after he said he wanted out.  Musk says his decision to drop out has to do with Twitter not providing him enough info to be able to verify how many accounts on the platform are fake and that could be tough to decide as data scientists say isn’t easy to determine.  Sarah Needleman, tech reporter at the WSJ, joins us for the complex metric this legal battle will be centered on. Next, CA Gov. Gavin Newsom took to Washington DC while President Biden is out of the country on a trip to Israel and the Middle East.  It seems that Newsom has been trying to raise his national profile on issues such as abortion, climate change and guns and even pushing back on his own party for not being strong enough on those issues.  All that movement has sparked discussion on whether he has presidential ambitions.  Hannah Knowles, campaign reporter at The Washington Post, joins us for more. Finally, Americans are cancelling homebuying deals at the highest rates since the start of the pandemic.  A new report from Redfin says 15% of deals are being cancelled and even homebuilders are seeing cancellations.  Inflation and higher mortgage rates are mostly to blame with some borrowers no longer qualifying for the loans they want.  Diana Olick, real estate correspondent at CNBC, joins us for what to know. See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

19m
Jul 14