The Mike Hosking Breakfast

Newstalk ZB

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Open your mind to the world with New Zealand’s number one breakfast radio show.

Without question, as New Zealand’s number one talk host, Mike Hosking sets the day’s agenda.

The sharpest voice and mind in the business, Mike drives strong opinion, delivers the best talent, and always leaves you wanting more.

The Mike Hosking Breakfast always cuts through and delivers the best daily on Newstalk ZB.

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3284 episodes

Mark the Week: When there are more seats than there are people to fill them, your system is broken

  SAM UFFINDELL: 6/10 "Because he should have front footed what he knew would be made public. But never deserved the vitriolic pile on he got."   THE NATIONAL PARTY HANDLING OF SAM UFFINDELL: 3/10 "At some point, do some of you want to wake up just long enough to work out that hobbling your own leader isn't going to go well for you?"   CABINET PAPERS: 3/10 "The government promised to release all decisions made within 30 business days because they wanted to be the most open, honest and transparent government we had ever seen. Guess what? It hasn't happened. And guess who one of the worst offenders is? The Prime Minister."   NCEA CHANGES: 3/10 "I get the broad thought process. But yet again the soft option is not how life works. And it teaches our kids that complaining brings results."   REPEAL OF THREE STRIKES LAW: 4/10 "If the polls are correct, it'll be brought back next year. But not the sort of move you want now, if you are a government with a poor reputation on crime."   LOCAL BODY POLITICS: 2/10 "When there are more seats than there are people wanting to fill them, your system is broken."   STUART NASH'S LATEST THOUGHT BUBBLE: 6/10 "Moving the university year is not actually as mad as it sounds. It has the seed of a half decent idea."   THE ALL BLACKS: 6/10 "I think they might win. That's another pile on that got out of control."   COMMONWEALTH GAMES: 9/10 "The medal haul tells you all you need to know. Participating is fun, but we celebrate medals, not turning up."   LISTEN ABOVE FOR MIKE HOSKING'S FULL WEEK IN REVIEW See omnystudio.com/listener https://omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

2m
Aug 11
Mike's Minute: Another shabby week in the world of politics

Is the biggest winner out of the Sam Uffindell drama the Government? Think of all the things they would have dreaded being talked about while we busied ourselves on the cock up that was essentially a two-fold mistake. Mistake one: the lack of up-front honesty in putting it out there from day one. Select him, I have no problem with it, what you did as a kid should not be a life sentence. But it was always going to get discovered Uffindell himself said so, so front foot it. Mistake two: the idiots in the selection process, including the Party President, should have told the right people. And the right people is not a flunky in the leaders office, it’s the leader themselves. Those simple things would have avoided all this. This is a story of immaturity, hopefully left behind 20 years ago.   And yet by weeks end, it's exercised us all more than it ever should. And oh, the irony, in a week when the poll for TVNZ confirmed the other polls this year. National and ACT at 48 percent are the next government. Compare that to the Labour-Green combo at 42 percent, and the Prime Minister at record low personal popularity. The issue of Three Waters. The Auditor General's report was not really covered. The economy, the inflation, the debt, the local elections with no candidates, and the firearms laws that will change nothing. The Three Strikes abolition that further cements the Government's position as soft on crime. We can't forget the one or two shootings and ram raids rounding out another violent week. Plus, let us not forget the free passes on NCEA, because it's all been a bit tough. On Uffindell, don't get me wrong, I spent as much time on it as anyone else. For a while, it was a proper story needing proper answers. But, yet again, too much of the media got obsessed about it and let themselves down and displayed yet again their clear distaste for anything National Party. And they love anything that even begins to sniff of personal tragedy. It turned by yesterday with the flat nonsense into character assassination. The media might at some point like to look at itself and wonder why its reputation is the way it is. As for Uffindell, I don’t like what I saw of him when he was a kid. But I don’t condemn him forever. And I hate the way we look to destroy people who clearly have grown up and want to contribute to the betterment of the country. Ultimately then by Friday morning, a shabby week. And if the Government are the winners, we also have an awful lot of losers. See omnystudio.com/listener https://omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

1m
Aug 11
Erica Stanford: National Immigration spokesperson says migrants want certainty, we don't offer that

Concerns from National, that we're still not doing more to attract skilled migrants. New figures from Stats NZ show New Zealand had a net migration loss of more than 11-thousand people in the year to June. It's the 16th consecutive month the country has recorded a net migration loss. National Immigration spokesperson Erica Stanford told Mike Hosking says the one thing migrants want is certainty, and we're not offering that. She says unless you're on the green list and get fast-tracked to residency, or you earn $115,000, there's no pathway to residency for you. LISTEN ABVOE See omnystudio.com/listener https://omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

4m
Aug 11
Patrick Phelps: Minerals West Coast Manager as Greens have mining ban bill pulled in Parliament

There are nervous times ahead for the mining sector. The Green Party have had their bill to ban mining on conservation land and water pulled from the biscuit tin ballot in Parliament. This is essentially giving them the green light to go hard on the Government. Patrick Phelps is the Minerals West Coast Manager and he joined Mike Hosking. LISTEN ABOVE See omnystudio.com/listener https://omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

2m
Aug 11
Ian Jones: Former All Black ahead of second test against South Africa

All Blacks coach Ian Foster has made what could be the final big call of his tenure, handing the No 10 jersey to Richie Mo'unga for the second test against South Africa at Ellis Park in Johannesburg this weekend. Foster is also gambling on two of his less-experienced props, Ethan de Groot and Tyrel Lomax, to match the Springboks' monstrous men. The All Blacks props have 20 test caps between them. It is the first test start of the year for Mo'unga, who guided the Crusaders to victory in Super Rugby Pacific, and has watched on ever since as the All Blacks have made faltering starts in all their matches this year. Incumbent first five-eighths Beauden Barrett, a two-time World Player of the Year, is relegated to the substitutes bench, from where he could enter the fray as a replacement for Mo'unga or in the outside backs. Other than the change at 10, the beleaguered coach largely played it safe in his backline selections, sticking with the same players who ran on to the field in last week's 26-10 humbling in the Rugby Championship opener in Mbombela. That result from a directionless performance was the fifth defeat in six starts for Foster's men. Jordie Barrett has overcome ankle injury concerns to hold on to the No 15 jersey, with another Springbok barrage of high balls likely. Caleb Clarke and Will Jordan start on the wings, while the coach persists with Rieko Ioane in the No 13 jersey. David Havili is at second five-eighths and Aaron Smith continues at halfback. Under-pressure captain Sam Cane has retained his place as openside flanker, and takes the field alongside No 8 Ardie Savea and Shannon Frizell, who has been called up to fill the No 6 jersey after Akira Ioane, who moves to the bench, had little impact last week. Locks Scott Barrett and Sam Whitelock return to duty, as does hooker Samisoni Taukei'aho — one of the few bright performers last week. Uncapped tighthead Fletcher Newell is set to make his All Blacks debut from the bench, with Angus Ta'avao missing out after struggling in the front row last week. Codie Taylor returns to the bench after being dropped in the first test, while George Bower, Tupou Vaa'i, Finlay Christie and Quinn Tupaea make up the rest of the substitutes. "Belief and confidence remain high in our group, which is working incredibly hard this week," said Foster. "Playing at Ellis Park is always a special occasion for any All Black team, and this weekend will be no different. "Adding to that, the Freedom Cup is on the line which makes this a challenge that everyone is looking forward to." Meanwhile, Duane Vermeulen is back for the Springboks at No 8 for his first test this year as South Africa made five changes to its starting lineup, the team announced earlier this week. Two of those changes were forced, with Jaden Hendrikse at halfback in place of Faf de Klerk, who was ruled out with concussion, while Jesse Kriel replaces Kurt-Lee Arendse, who was sent off, injured and subsequently suspended for four games after a dangerous tackle on Beauden Barrett in the first test. South Africa coach Jacques Nienaber also made two tactical switches in the front row by bringing in Ox Nché for Trevor Nyakane at loosehead prop and restoring Bongi Mbonambi as starting hooker in place of Malcolm Marx. Tighthead prop Frans Malherbe is set for his 50th test. The Springboks are seeking back-to-back wins over the All Blacks for the first time since 2009 and another defeat for New Zealand is expected to see Foster lose his job. The All Blacks have slipped to an all-time low of No 5 on the world rankings. ALL BLACKS: Jordie Barrett, Will Jordan, Rieko Ioane, David Havili, Caleb Clarke, Richie Mo'unga, Aaron Smith, Ardie Savea, Sam Cane (captain), Shannon Frizell, Scott Barrett, Sam Whitelock, Tyrell Lomax, Samisoni Taukei'aho, Ethan de Groot. RESERVES: Codie Taylor, George Bower, Fletcher Newell*, Tupou Vaa'i, Akira Ioane, Finlay Christie, Beauden Barrett, Quinn Tupaea. SOUTH AFRICA: Damian Willemse, Jesse Kriel, Lukhanyo Am, Damian de Allende, Makazole Mapimpi, Handré Pollard, Jaden Hendrikse, Duane Vermeulen, Pieter-Steph du Toit, Siya Kolisi (captain), Lood de Jager, Eben Etzebeth, Frans Malherbe, Bongi Mbonambi, Ox Nché. RESERVES: Malcolm Marx, Steven Kitshoff, Vincent Koch, Franco Mostert, Jasper Wiese, Kwagga Smith, Herschel Jantjies, Willie le Roux. See omnystudio.com/listener https://omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

3m
Aug 11
Julie Ann-Genter: Greens Transport spokesperson says it's too early to judge Te Huia

The Greens say the problems dogging Te Huia shouldn't stop us from expanding the regional rail network. The Transport and Infrastructure Select Committee is taking public submissions, as part of an inquiry into the country's passenger rail network. Newstalk ZB has revealed Te Huia, the recently launched Hamilton to Auckland rail service, has been plagued with low passenger numbers and other issues. But Greens Transport spokesperson Julie Ann-Genter told Mike Hosking future services will be faster and more frequent. She does it's too early to judge Te Huia as it takes time for people to plan their lives around a new service. LISTEN ABOVE See omnystudio.com/listener https://omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

3m
Aug 11
Greg Harford: Retail NZ CEO says violent youth crime is becoming more common, and part of the culture

A major change to social attitudes may be needed, to stem the current spate of youth crime. Two young people have been arrested, after at least 30 teenagers attacked a shop worker in Palmerston North. The owner of another store has told Newstalk ZB https://www.newstalkzb.co.nz/on-air/heather-du-plessis-allan-drive/audio/palmerston-north-store-owner-on-youth-criminals-terrorising-local-mall/ they've also been terrorised by the same group. Retail NZ Chief Executive Greg Harford told Mike Hosking says violent youth crime is becoming more common, and part of the culture. He says we're seeing the result of years of ingrained behaviour, encouraged by watching unpunished criminal activity in movies and online. LISTEN ABOVE See omnystudio.com/listener https://omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

2m
Aug 11
Barry Soper: Newstalk ZB Political Editor says MP Gaurav Sharma has thrown his colleagues under the bus

Expect a political fall-out, from a Labour MP's allegations of rampant bullying in Parliament. Hamilton West Labour MP Gaurav Sharma claims bullying has become commonplace. He's accusing the Prime Minister's Office, the Parliamentary Service, the party leaders' offices, and the party whips' offices for allowing it to happen. Newstalk ZB Political Editor Barry Soper told Mike Hosking Sharma has thrown his colleagues under the bus. LISTEN ABOVE See omnystudio.com/listener https://omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

3m
Aug 11
Andrew Lessells: Union of Students say changing uni terms not as simple as changing dates around

Changing university terms, to get more students into summer jobs, could be easier said than done. Tourism Minister Stuart Nash has suggested moving the university year by six weeks so students are available to work during the main tourism season. Union of Students' Associations Andrew Lessells says many students would welcome the move. But he told Mike Hosking it won't be as simple as just changing dates around. He says there are issues such as the heat students will face while doing exams in the middle of summer. LISTEN ABOVE   See omnystudio.com/listener https://omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

2m
Aug 10
Ross Taylor: Black Caps legend on his new book Black and White

It's fair to say Ross Taylor is one of New Zealand’s all time cricketing greats. He ended his career earlier this year as the all-time best run scorer across all formats - including Test, ODIs and T20s. That included the most centuries in international cricket, with 40, and the most appearances for the Black Caps. Now he's telling his story in his biography which is out today. It includes his side of the captaincy saga of 2012. Ross Taylor joined Mike Hosking. LISTEN ABOVE See omnystudio.com/listener https://omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

12m
Aug 10
Mike's Minute: We can't make education easier forever

The principals have got what they wanted. A couple of weeks ago, they wrote to the Government about easing the NCEA requirements. They claimed students were getting depressed and everyone was at breaking point. And the Government has come to the party. 46 merit or excellence credits instead of 50. For University Entrance, 12 credits from two approved subjects, instead of 14 from three. In simple terms they have made it easier. It's not hard to make it easier, but to what end? I'm torn, as a parent and as a person who sat all this stuff, I couldn't wait to leave school. I hated exams, I found large portions of the academic exercise completely fruitless and futile, and I knew what I wanted to do, how to do it, and school was holding me back. I have seen it in some of our kids as well. My School Certificate and University Entrance qualifications have meant virtually nothing to me once I left school, other than a record that I turned up for a number of years and passed some exams. So, make it as easy as you want, what does it really matter? But then, it's critical isn't it? What is it we are teaching? How are we teaching? How do we compare? And how do we compete? School is the foundation of learning. It's the starting pack for life and participating in it. The evidence shows as a country we aren't doing well. In those core subjects like science, maths, and literacy we are slipping and slipping badly. Where once we were at the top of the OECD, now we aren't and we aren't even close. And making stuff easy, like handing out free grades, doesn’t help. Yes, Covid is tough and school life is tough. You can't get teachers and schools are social welfare agencies, but tough times are a test not a reason to acquiesce, to quit, give up, or ask for a free pass. We are sadly running a lowest common denominator operation. I have three kids in education. They've all been disrupted, they’ve all been at home, but they haven't given up and they don’t want an easy ride. Covid is an excuse, it's been used. And it continues to be used as too much of an excuse. We can't do this, don’t do this, that’s stopped, and we aren't doing that anymore. Do many aspects of life that because of Covid, no longer happen. It's “have an inch take a mile” mindset. You know how it goes, why is it delayed? Because of Covid. And now the schools, kids' education, and an investment for life are being given up because of a couple of years of disruption. If the subject was determination and mindset, on this decision we fail. And when we fail, we fail our kids. See omnystudio.com/listener https://omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

2m
Aug 10
Marcus Lush: Newstalk ZB host says he is not just making up numbers in Invercargill mayoralty race

Marcus Lush is talking up his chances of becoming Invercargill's new mayor. The Newstalk ZB host and Invercargill City Councillor has confirmed he's running for the job Sir Tim Shadbolt has held since 1998. He told Mike Hosking he's not just there to make up the numbers or bring attention to local democracy; he's in it to win it. LISTEN ABOVE See omnystudio.com/listener https://omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

3m
Aug 10
Greg Foran: Air NZ CEO as airline cuts schedule as it struggles for crew and planes

Air New Zealand will cut its planned schedule and operate 1.5 per cent fewer seats than originally planned during the next six months. The airline says it is taking proactive measures to protect customers' travel plans as sickness continues to cause disruption. And in a move that will anger former crew hoping to get their jobs back, the airline is exploring expensive "wet leasing" aircraft with crew for the busy summer period. The airline said most customers who experience a flight change will be transferred to another flight on the same day for domestic travel, and for international travel, on the same day or a day either side of their original booking. Where customers cannot be accommodated within these timeframes, they may change their booking online, opt into credit or request a refund. Those customers with changes will start to see them from today and will be automatically transferred to another flight. Those with further onward connections may also be disrupted and "we will work through these directly with impacted customers". Air New Zealand chief executive Greg Foran said making these changes now gives customers advance notice and will help the airline provide a service that's more reliable during its rebuild. "Like many airlines around the world, we've been ramping up our operation at a time when Covid and the flu continues to impact the aviation industry. Looking at the disruptions our customers and staff have faced over the past five weeks, we've made some adjustments to reduce short-notice cancellations in the months ahead." Sickness has been three times normal levels and the airline is still in the process of bringing back its biggest planes, Boeing 777-300s. "While we did factor sickness into our ramp up plan, we've seen the highest rates of crew sickness in over a decade. We see these challenges continuing not just for crew, but for our whole operation, and so we're making proactive changes to address them." Foran said reducing the number of flights means the airline will be able to have crew on standby to cover illness, which has not been possible lately. The airline is "pulling out all the stops" to minimise disruption and provide surety for our customers over the next six months. "We have rehired or brought on more than 2000 pilots, airport staff, cabin crew, contact centre and engineers, and we're going as fast as we can with recruitment and training." The airline was also exploring options to lease a crewed widebody aircraft for the busy summer period. "We know customers want the Air New Zealand experience, and that's what we want to deliver too. But at the moment we're stretched to capacity and making sure our customers are able to travel is our top priority. The lease of an additional crewed aircraft may help us achieve that." In the summer of 2017-18 the airline wet leased aircraft from specialist Hi Fly from Portugal to plug gaps caused by the grounding of Boeing 787 Dreamliners which needed engine repairs. T Air New Zealand's domestic and international schedule will be operating at 90 per cent of pre-Covid capacity for the next six months. Advice to travellers: What should I do if my flight changes because of these schedule changes? • If your domestic flight has changed and you have not been given a flight on the same day, then you will be able to request a change online under Manage my Booking, opt into credit or request a refund. __ __ When can you get a refund? __ __ See omnystudio.com/listener https://omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

5m
Aug 10
Stephen England-Hall: Real NZ CEO says tourism sector is now in a good position to restart

A tourism leader says things are looking up for the sector, after years of travel restrictions. Tourism Minister Stuart Nash has unveiled a new plan to strengthen the tourism and hospitality workforce for the upcoming tourism boom. It includes measures to improve training and working conditions. Real NZ CEO Stephen England-Hall told Mike Hosking the sector is now in a good position to restart. He says while it will take a while to get back to pre-pandemic levels of travel, the future is certainly certainly brighter than the last couple of years. LISTEN ABOVE See omnystudio.com/listener https://omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

2m
Aug 10
Jan Tinetti: Associate Education Minister defends latest changes to NCEA

The Government is defending its latest NCEA changes. This year's NCEA students will receive an extra credit for every five earned through assessment, to support those affected by the Covid pandemic. National says lowering the bar is doing students a disservice. But Associate Education Minister Jan Tinetti told Mike Hosking the changes reflect that some students have missed weeks of school because of isolation. LISTEN ABOVE See omnystudio.com/listener https://omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

3m
Aug 10
Chris Finlayson: Former National cabinet minister says Uffindell's past should have been fully disclosed to Luxon

Sam Uffindell's political future is looking increasingly uncertain. National has stood down the new Tauranga MP, following revelations about bullying at Auckland's Kings College and allegations of aggressive behaviour at Otago University. It's also emerged he was put on notice while he was at university, over the state of his flat. Former National cabinet minister Chris Finlayson told Mike Hosking Uffindell's past should have been fully disclosed to leader Christopher Luxon. He says if you selectively feed things to the party or the leadership, there can be problems. LISTEN ABOVE See omnystudio.com/listener https://omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

2m
Aug 10
Pollies: MPs Mark Mitchell and Megan Woods on the Sam Uffindell saga

Labour is insisting it would have handled the Sam Uffindell saga differently. The new National MP for Tauranga has been stood down while the party investigates new allegations about his behaviour at university, allegations which he denies. Uffindell had already been under fire, over revelations he was involved in an attack on a younger boy while he was at high school. Senior Labour Cabinet Minister Megan Woods told Mike Hosking while Luxon wasn't told about the allegations; the Labour Party always informs its leader about such matters. National’s Mark Mitchell told Mike Hosking Luxon is right to be taking the matter seriously. LISTEN ABOVE   See omnystudio.com/listener https://omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

11m
Aug 09
Mike's Minute: Uffindell saga a total mess

Despite Sam Uffindell's denials on this show yesterday that there was nothing else to disclose, turns out, at least in some people's minds, there is something else to disclose. But exactly what is the key and how out of control this gets is another major part of the equation.   The claim is that in a flat in 2003 he was a bully and he was verbally aggressive towards a female flatmate. Uffindell is now stood down as the obligatory QC is called in to investigate. So, what is a bully? What is verbally aggressive? And how, given it happened, allegedly, he denies it by the way, 20 years ago, does anyone really get to the bottom of it? And even if they come close, what is the fallout? What is the penalty? This is a mess. But then it was always going to be a mess, because this is who we are, sadly. Despite all the hypha-looting talk about forgive and forget, rehabilitation, youthful indiscretion, moving on, and growing up, we don't actually want that, we want revenge. At least it appears these two who have made the allegations do. Attacking someone as Uffindell admitted to as a 16-year-old isn't on, no one says it is. But going to the media to complain is not about putting it right, it's about revenge. Accusing the same person of banging on your door and yelling obscenities takes the case into the area of farce as well as petty revenge. In this day and age, we must all tread ever so carefully in case we offend someone. Banging on doors and yelling obscenities isn't dignified. But if that is now the hurdle you need to pass to enter public life, anyone who went to university and had too much to drink is never going to ever apply for anything. What else can these complainants want? Other than the destruction of a public figure? And why do they get to make the allegations while under the safety of anonymity?   All these years later, are you seriously telling me it only became an issue worth speaking out on now? Why? Revenge is a powerful driver of emotion. None of this paints the young Uffindell in a good light. He's copped that and said sorry. How many of us, with a similar light, might have one or two stories we aren't proud of? This is a pile on. Chris Luxon is between a rock and a hard place. You have to investigate, what else can you do? And where does it stop? If banging on the door and yelling is cause for a QC, how many other stories of doors are out there? If behaviour is the critical component here, look at Uffindell all you want, but what about the behaviour and motive of those that look to destroy a person all these years later? See omnystudio.com/listener https://omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

2m
Aug 09
Dr Samantha Murton: Study finds cancer symptoms more likely missed during video consultations

Cancer symptoms are more likely to be missed by GP’s during video consultations, a study by Oxford University suggests. Its research says that remote consultations can hinder doctors from noticing subtle clues that could point to serious illness. Dr Samantha Murton, President of the Royal New Zealand College of GPs, joined Mike Hosking.\ LISTEN ABOVE See omnystudio.com/listener https://omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

2m
Aug 09
Richard Arnold: US correspondent on FBI raid of Trump's Florida property

The FBI's unprecedented search of former President Donald Trump's Florida residence ricocheted around government, politics and a polarized country Tuesday along with questions as to why the Justice Department — notably cautious under Attorney General Merrick Garland — decided to take such a drastic step. Answers weren't quickly forthcoming. Agents on Monday searched Trump's Mar-a-Lago estate, which is also a private club, as part of a federal investigation into whether the former president took classified records from the White House to his Florida residence, people familiar with the matter said. It marked a a dramatic escalation of law enforcement scrutiny of Trump, who faces an array of inquiries tied to his conduct in the waning days of his administration. From echoes of Watergate to the more immediate House probe of the Jan. 6 Capitol insurrection, Washington, a city used to sleepy Augusts, reeled from one speculative or accusatory headline to the next. Was the Justice Department politicized? What prompted it to seek authorization to search the estate for classified documents now, months after it was revealed that Trump had taken boxes of materials with him when he left the White House after losing the 2020 election? Garland has not tipped his hand despite an outcry from some Democrats impatient over whether the department was even pursuing evidence that has surfaced in the Jan. 6 probe and other investigations— and from Republicans who were swift to echo Trump's claims that he was the victim of political prosecution. All Garland has said publicly is that "no one is above the law." FBI agents descended on Trump's shuttered-for-the-season home — he was in New York, a thousand or so miles away — with search warrants. Monday's search intensified the months-long probe into how classified documents ended up in boxes of White House records located at Mar-a-Lago earlier this year. A separate grand jury is investigating efforts to overturn the results of the 2020 presidential election, and it all adds to potential legal peril for Trump as he lays the groundwork for a potential repeat run for the White House. Familiar battle lines, forged during a a four-year presidency shadowed by investigations, quickly took shape again. Trump and his allies sought to cast the search as a weaponization of the criminal justice system and a Democratic-driven effort to keep him from winning another term in 2024 — though the Biden White House said it had no prior knowledge and current FBI Director Christopher Wray was appointed by Trump five years ago. Trump, disclosing the search in a lengthy statement late Monday, asserted that agents had opened a safe at his home, and he described their work as an "unannounced raid" that he likened to "prosecutorial misconduct." Justice Department spokesperson Dena Iverson declined to comment on the search, including whether Garland had personally authorized it. About two dozen Trump supporters stood in protest at midmorning Tuesday in the Florida summer heat and sporadic light rain on a bridge near the former president's residence. One held a sign reading "Democrats are Fascists" while others carried flags saying "2020 Was Rigged," "Trump 2024" and Biden's name with an obscenity. Some cars honked in support as they passed. Trump's Vice President Mike Pence, a potential 2024 rival, tweeted on Tuesday: "Yesterday's action undermines public confidence in our system of justice and Attorney General Garland must give a full accounting to the American people as to why this action was taken and he must do so immediately" Trump was planning to meet Tuesday at his Bedminster, New Jersey, club with members of the Republican Study Committee, a group headed by Rep. Jim Banks of Indiana that says it is committed to putting forth his priorities in Congress. The FBI reached out to the Secret Service shortly before serving a warrant, a third person familiar with the matter told The Associated Press. Secret Service agents contacted the Justice Department and were able to validate the warrant before facilitating access to the estate, the person said. The Justice Department has been investigating the potential mishandling of classified information since the National Archives and Records Administration said it had received from Mar-a-Lago 15 boxes of White House records, including documents containing classified information, earlier this year. The National Archives said Trump should have turned over that material upon leaving office, and it asked the Justice Department to investigate. There are multiple federal laws governing the handling of classified records and sensitive government documents, including statutes that make it a crime to remove such material and retain it at an unauthorized location. Though a search warrant does not necessarily mean criminal charges are near or even expected, federal officials looking to obtain one must first demonstrate to a judge that they have probable cause that a crime occurred. Two people familiar with the matter, speaking on condition of anonymity to discuss an ongoing investigation, said the search on Monday was related to the records probe. Agents were also looking to see if Trump had additional presidential records or any classified documents at the estate. Trump has previously maintained that presidential records were turned over "in an ordinary and routine process." His son Eric said on Fox News on Monday night that he had spent the day with his father and that the search happened because "the National Archives wanted to corroborate whether or not Donald Trump had any documents in his possession." Asked how the documents ended up at Mar-a-Lago, Eric Trump said the boxes were among items that got moved out of the White House during "six hours" on Inauguration Day, as the Bidens prepared to move into the building. "My father always kept press clippings," Eric Trump said. "He had boxes, when he moved out of the White House." Trump himself, in a social media post Monday night, called the search a "weaponization of the Justice System, and an attack by Radical Left Democrats who desperately don't want me to run for President in 2024." Trump took a different stance during the 2016 presidential campaign, frequently pointing to an FBI investigation into his Democratic opponent, Hillary Clinton, over whether she mishandled classified information via a private email server she used as secretary of state. Then-FBI Director James Comey concluded that Clinton had sent and received classified information, but the FBI did not recommend criminal charges. Trump lambasted that decision and then stepped up his criticism of the FBI as agents began investigating whether his campaign had colluded with Russia to tip the 2016 election. He fired Comey during that probe, and though he appointed Wray months later, he repeatedly criticized him, too, as president. Thomas Schwartz, a Vanderbilt University history professor who studies and writes about the presidency, said there is no precedent for a former president facing an FBI raid -- even going back to Watergate. President Richard Nixon wasn't allowed to take tapes or other materials from the White House when he resigned in 1974, Schwartz noted, and many of his papers remained in Washington for years before being transferred to his presidential library in California. The probe is hardly the only legal headache confronting Trump. A separate investigation related to efforts by him and his allies to undo the results of the 2020 presidential election — which led to the Jan. 6, 2021, riot at the U.S. Capitol — has also been intensifying in Washington. Several former White House officials have received grand jury subpoenas. And a district attorney in Fulton County, Georgia, is investigating whether Trump and his close associates sought to interfere in that state's election, which was won by Democrat Joe Biden. ___ Associated Press writers Terry Spencer, Meg Kinnard, Michelle L. Price and Will Weissert contributed to this report. See omnystudio.com/listener https://omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

4m
Aug 09
Vaughan Couillault: Secondary Principals' Assn on signs students are heading back to schools

There are encouraging signs that students are heading back to school across the country. New figures show daily attendance reached as high as 84-percent in the first week of Term Three, following lower attendance rates last term. Secondary Principals' Association President Vaughan Couillault told Mike Hosking many schools had been struggling with student disengagement. He says there is some serious disengagement by senior students who need to work, to help support their families. LISTEN ABOVE See omnystudio.com/listener https://omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

3m
Aug 09
Dylan Thomsen: AA Speed Policy Advisor says we need a smarter approach than income-based fines

The AA says higher fines for wealthier drivers won't necessarily lead to safer roads. Transport officials have been giving the Government advice on potential changes to the system of fines, which have mostly remained unaltered for two decades. Potential changes could include linking fines to people's incomes. AA Speed Policy Advisor Dylan Thomsen told Mike Hosking we need a smarter approach, than income-based fines. He says suspended sentences, where a fine may jump up if a person is penalised more than once, has had success overseas. LISTEN ABOVE See omnystudio.com/listener https://omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

2m
Aug 09
Chris Hipkins: Police Minister says new law gives Police another tool to combat gun crime

The Police Minister says a new law change will give Police another tool to combat gun crime. The Firearms Prohibition Order Legislation Bill has passed its third reading in Parliament overnight. It means anyone with a serious conviction like murder, serious assault or sexual violence can be banned from having a gun, or being in places where guns are likely to be, for ten years. Chris Hipkins told Mike Hosking the new law will give police the powers to follow up with offenders. He says if offenders are around firearms or possessing firearms, then police have an extra power they can use to prevent further offending. LISTEN ABOVE See omnystudio.com/listener https://omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

4m
Aug 09
Christopher Luxon: National leader says Uffindell allegations need to be thoroughly investigated

STAFF REPORTER AND RNZ Under-fire National MP Sam Uffindell has been stood down from the party's caucus, pending an investigation into further "very concerning accusations" surrounding his past behaviour. In a statement late on Tuesday night, National Party leader Christopher Luxon said he had been made aware of new allegations about Uffindell's behaviour toward a female flatmate while Uffindell was at university in 2003. The woman has told RNZ Uffindell was an aggressive bully who once pounded on her bedroom door, screaming obscenities, until she fled through her window. Uffindell has denied any accusations he was involved in bullying or intimidatory behaviour while at university. This morning National Party leader Chris Luxon told Newstalk ZB's Mike Hosking the situation was very concerning. "You got a situation where a young woman, a flatmate has made serious allegations. It is a concerning situation for a father whose daughter is flatting, it's very real. They are serious allegations that need to be investigated. Sam is disputing the allegations." Asked if Uffindell still had his backing, Luxon told TVNZ: "We'll find out in the next few weeks because really, what this investigation is about, is looking at both sides of that investigation." Luxon also acknowledged that the investigation was needed to honour the "alleged victim" too. The new allegations came a day after revelations that the new Tauranga MP, as a teenager, beat up a younger boy at boarding school. "This evening my office became aware of very concerning accusations made to RNZ about behaviour shown by Mr Uffindell toward a female flatmate in 2003 while at university," Luxon said. "Mr Uffindell disputes the allegations and in the interests of natural justice, an independent investigation will now be undertaken to determine the facts. While this process is under way, Mr Uffindell will be stood down from caucus." FORMER FLATMATE'S ACCUSATIONS Uffindell's former flatmate, who RNZ agreed not to name, lived with him and three other Otago University students for several months in Dunedin in 2003. She told RNZ Uffindell engaged in a pattern of bullying during their second year at university, describing him as "verbally aggressive". Uffindell would trash the house after "excessive" use of alcohol and drugs, she said. "This was intimidation. This was bullying. I didn't feel safe," she said. The woman said she eventually moved out of the flat after having to lock herself in her bedroom to avoid a drunken outburst one night. "He was smashing on my door and yelling obscenities and basically telling me to get out - 'hit the road, fatty'. "I ended up climbing out of my bedroom window and ran to a friend's house to stay the night. I feared for my safety. I was scared." The woman said it was not an isolated incident: "it was just the straw that broke the camel's back." Her father travelled to Dunedin the next day to help her move out, she said. Speaking to RNZ, the woman's father corroborated his part in the story and said his daughter had been "seriously upset". "The flat itself was completely trashed. There wasn't a stick of furniture left. There was no crockery left. There were no handles left on anything. It had all been broken." He said he gave Uffindell and two of the other flatmates "a serious piece of [his] mind" at the time. "It was clear... [Uffindell] had real issues, real problems... he was out of control." The woman said she was traumatised by the event and did her best to avoid Uffindell from then on: "my stomach would absolutely flip and drop if I saw him". Looking back, the woman said she should have spoken to someone or taken some sort of action, but she was too scared. Uffindell never apologised for his actions, she said. She said people may try to excuse Uffindell's actions because of his age, but the pattern of behaviour revealed his character. "Listening to his maiden speech in Parliament, he talks about lack of accountability and a sense of impunity - I think that's so hypocritical." UFFINDELL'S RESPONSE In a statement and while not addressing the specific allegations, Uffindell admitted engaging in a "student lifestyle" while at university. "When I was a student at Otago I enjoyed a student lifestyle, which included drinking and, at times, smoking marijuana," he said. "While in second year a number of flatmates fell out – and two of the flatmates left midway through the year. "I reject any accusation that I engaged in behaviour that was intimidatory or bullying. This simply did not happen. "While there is an investigation into these accusations I will not make further comment." National Party president Sylvia Wood said the investigation into the latest allegations would be conducted by Maria Dew QC and is expected to take two weeks. "As the party only became aware of these allegations this evening, the details of the investigation will be finalised over the next few days, including the terms of reference." Wood said in a statement. "In the interests of letting due process run its course, I will not be making additional comment on this issue while the investigation is carried out." Uffindell - who won the Tauranga byelection in June - had apologised to the boy he assaulted in 1999 while at King's College. In multiple interviews on Monday, he claimed the attack was the "stupidest" thing he'd ever done and still regretted the incident. On Tuesday he admitted to being a "bully" and a "thug" when he was younger. Speaking to the Herald on Monday, Uffindell said he believed the assault on the then 13-year-old boy 23 years ago would become public during his running in the Tauranga byelection this year. When it didn't, Uffindell chose not to tell the public until it was revealed by Stuff on Monday - a decision he still stands by, despite saying he had "taken ownership" of the incident and it had made him grow as a person. He also revealed he may have tackled other students during the "raid" of the third form (Year 9) dorm that saw him expelled, in addition to punching one student in the arm and body several times. Earlier on Tuesday, Luxon said he was standing by Uffindell after news broke of the assault, but insisted he should have been told of the incident earlier. "He has my backing and he has my support but clearly he needs to build back trust with the voters of Tauranga," Luxon said. Luxon confirmed that Uffindell had declared the incident to the National Party when he sought to be a candidate. "He is not the same person that he was 22 years ago as a 16-year-old." Luxon said he should have been informed earlier. The delegates should have been informed and the voters of Tauranga should have been informed earlier. He said Uffindell's admission during selection had triggered deeper background checks and he believed that was how it was supposed to work. Luxon said National's character checking extended to speaking to people who had known Uffindell since after the King's College incident. "There was a deep exploration of this issue with Sam." While the violence committed at the school was "totally unacceptable and abhorrent", Luxon said he had been assured that Uffindell did not have any other incidents in his past. See omnystudio.com/listener https://omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

7m
Aug 09
Andrew Little: Health Minister on claims new residency visa has resulted in nine applications in first month

The Health Minister insists immigration rules aren't the reason nurses aren't coming here. Employment Ministry figures show only nine nurses on residency visas have arrived in the country since the criteria for the visas was expanded at the start of last month. Nurses were controversially excluded from the system at first, which meant they could only apply for residency after two years. Andrew Little told Mike Hosking people he's spoken to overseas say immigration rules aren't the issue. He says it's more important they can get here and registration is as easy as possible. LISTEN ABOVE   See omnystudio.com/listener https://omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

2m
Aug 08
Mike's Minute: We need more than talk over the rampaging crime spree

I note the some of the media have reacquainted themselves with crime. The Government to their credit managed to quieten the whole mess down for a while by disposing of Poto Williams who, although spectacularly useless, was really just a sacrificial lamb to get the heat off the Government over an issue they have been woefully found wanting on. Chris Hipkins announced he would visit every police district in the country. We had the Police Association on telling us they liked Hipkins and he had read his briefing papers, so things were looking up. Meantime the ram-raids, abuse, violence, and lawlessness rolled on given thugs aren't really interested in political appointments. Fast forward to this past weekend, and suddenly it's back. One headline: "Auckland at a tipping point." There was another suggesting the Prime Minister found all these break-ins atrocious. And then yet another saying she rejected the idea that nothing happened to the people who commit the crimes. So upside of all this is, at least, those who were sucked into thinking it was no longer an issue have woken up to the reality. The great hope is they don't fall for it again. The Prime Minister can find it as atrocious as she likes, but that’s not the point. The point is what, beyond sacking the last Minister is she, has she, and will she do about it? Their initial position was to deny it all. That's their standard go to, pretend it isn't real. Then when that fails, tell us what they’ve done previously. That is normally how much money they spent, what sort of working group they set up, and in this case how they sort of got more cops on the beat. Their figures never include those who have left, so it doesn’t really count. But here is the real issue, it doesn’t actually matter what you have done, what matters is whether it worked? Given the answer is no, it then proves conclusively that what you did wasn’t go enough and more needs to be done. That's the problem with being a government for five years. It actually falls on your decisions, your solutions, and your actions. After five years, with shop after shop, window after window, and punk after punk running rampant, I don’t care how many cops are out there, it isn't anywhere close to being enough. The fact a lot of it happens in front of us in broad daylight is proof positive that whatever consequences there are, they don’t work either. The sort of consequences most of us want involve these people being removed from society for sustained periods of time, which clearly isn't happening. After five years, denial and obfuscation are not policies. And as of next year, they won't be winning votes. See omnystudio.com/listener https://omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

2m
Aug 08
Sam Uffindell: Tauranga MP admits he should have disclosed his past, before standing in by-election

National MP Sam Uffindell said there was a culture of "rough and tumble" when asked if he had been involved in any other incidents of bullying as a schoolboy. Aged 16 as a Year 11 student at King's College, Uffindell and three others jumped on the then 13-year-old boy and began beating him with what was believed to be unscrewed wooden bed legs. "Boarding houses in the 1999, there was a bit of rough and tumble that went on... we would tackle and punch each other around a bit, but I wouldn't go out and focus on someone. "This was the most serious," he told RNZ. He also said that any other incidents were "not targeted" but would not disclose details. Uffindell reiterated that when we was asked to leave King's College it was solely related to the assault he was involved in made on a 13-year-old student. He said the incident was his fault and he takes full accountability. "I try and live my life as an adult as a responsible person to set a good example to my children and to others." The National Party leader Christopher Luxon and his deputy Nicola Willis only learned of Sam Uffindell's school teenage dormitory assault yesterday afternoon, it has been revealed. Willis told RNZ said she found out about the incident just after lunchtime and she believed that Luxon also found out then. She said Uffindell had disclosed the incident to the pre-selection panel, made up of local and national party representatives, and they had made the decision about not precluding him from standing for Parliament. "That's a party matter. That's their judgement. Where I stand on this today is that I have advised Sam that what he should do now is be completely upfront with New Zealanders about this because ultimately it is the people of New Zealand and the people of Tauranga who will be the judges of us." Willis described it as a serious incident and her thoughts were with the victim, saying it would have been a traumatic event at the time and something that would never leave you. She said there should be room in Parliament for those who made serious errors, accounted for them but were now committed to using their position for good. "If I thought that Sam was still the same man as he was when he was a 16-year-old when he committed this act then I don't think there would be a place for him in Parliament. However, I see that he is extremely sincere in his regret in his genuine apology and that he is being upfront about what occurred and that he is a different person today than when this happened." His former school, King's College, has also spoken out after it was revealed the National MP assaulted a 13-year-old student while attending the school. King's College headmaster Simon Lamb confirmed the incident and said it was dealt with at the time. "The issue referred to in the Stuff article today was a matter which the College dealt with 22 years ago," said Lamb. "Since that time, the College has not been involved in any follow-up activity with those involved, including the recent discussions reported in the article." The incident reportedly occurred in 1999 on the last night of term inside one of the King's College boarding houses. It was reported by Stuff that the now MP for Tauranga apologised to his victim 22 years after the attack and nine months before he revealed his political aspirations. Uffindell has detailed the late-night violent beating of a younger boy that led to him being asked to leave King's College while he was a student. Speaking to Newstalk ZB's Heather du Plessis-Allan, Uffindell confirmed the incident and said it was "one of the dumbest, stupidest things I have ever done". He also wouldn't rule out standing down as MP. "It was one of the silliest, stupidest things I've ever done. I really regretted it, I do really regret it still," Uffindell told Newstalk ZB. Police were not involved but he was asked to leave King's College, and finished his schooling at St Paul's Collegiate in Hamilton. Uffindell said at the end of the school year students went into the third-form dorm and "raided them". With the boy, he said he punched him a "bunch of times" in the arms and body. He and the other boys were called into the school the next day and asked to leave, Uffindell said. He said he was gutted about the incident, "had taken ownership of it" and had thought about it for years. He said he had "no recollection" of using bed legs to beat the boy. "I still am sorry for what happened, I wish it had not happened." A statement from the National Party said the party had been "proactively informed" about the incident by Uffindell during the selection process ahead of the Tauranga byelection. "It was a significant event reflecting a serious error of judgment by a then 16-year-old for which he has apologised and regrets to this day," the statement read. The victim, who was not named, told Stuff that Uffindell contacted him through a mutual acquaintance in July last year to apologise, which the victim eventually accepted. "But then a few months later I sat down to watch the news on the couch with a beer and there he was, running for Parliament," the victim said. "I felt sick." Uffindell had reportedly not mentioned his political intentions during the interaction. "We had a long conversation and I was grateful that he accepted my apology. My apology was genuine then, and it is genuine now." See omnystudio.com/listener https://omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

7m
Aug 08
Bryan Brown: Australian acting royalty on his new show Darby and Joan

There's no doubt Bryan Brown is Australian acting royalty. He started his career back in the 1970s and has gone to have plenty of success at home and abroad. His credits include and Brown was inducted into the Logie Hall of Fame in 1989, but certainly hasn't stopped there. Now he's back with a new drama, which is out on Acorn TV now. Bryan Brown joined Mike Hosking. LISTEN ABOVE See omnystudio.com/listener https://omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

12m
Aug 08
Greg Lowe: Beca Group CEO welcomes National's approach to getting young people into work

The head of a major employer is welcoming National's "tailored approach" to getting young people into work. National's unveiled a new plan to get under-25s off the Jobseeker benefit. Under the plan, young beneficiaries would get a job coach and a financial bonus for getting and staying in work, and those who refuse to take part would be penalised. Beca Group Chief Executive Greg Lowe told Mike Hosking some young people face barriers to employment. He says if it's a way for more young people to get work it has to be a positive thing and it seems to be a way for Government and business to work together on the issue. LISTEN ABOVE See omnystudio.com/listener https://omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

3m
Aug 07
Laurie Mains: Former All Blacks’ coach gives his take on the loss to South Africe

It was always going to be a tough ask for the All Blacks to beat the Springboks in South Africa. But it was the manner in which they were beaten that doesn't give much hope to fans. The All Blacks went down 26-10, but our only try came in the dying minutes on a runaway break while the Springboks were a man down. Apart from that they were beaten soundly around the park by a more composed and efficient South African team. Former All Blacks’ coach Laurie Mains joined Mike Hosking to give his take on the match. LISTEN ABOVE See omnystudio.com/listener https://omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

4m
Aug 07