WARDROBE CRISIS with Clare Press

Clare Press

About

WARDROBE CRISIS is a fashion podcast about sustainability, ethical fashion and making a difference in the world. Host Clare Press was the first VOGUE sustainability editor, and each week she interviews international guests about the big issues facing the fashion industry. Get to know their personal stories, and be part of the change.

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166 episodes

Back to Nature - Plant Dyes at Chelsea Flower Show

Fancy wearing a dress coloured sunny yellow by daffodils or a shirt dyed blue with woad? This week we're talking NATURAL DYES AND THE MAGIC OF TEXTILES DERIVED FROM PLANTS for a special episode produced with FASHION REVOLUTION and guest-hosted by CARRY SOMERS. Carry's talking with garden designer LOTTIE DELAMAIN and natural dyes expert KATE TURNBULL. Together, they've created a garden for Chelsea Flower Show "to inspire visitors to re-imagine the link between what we can grow and what we wear, showcasing creative possibilities and innovative thinking around how we can use our resources to create more sustainable solutions." They say: "Throughout history plants have played a fundamental role in fashion – as dye, as fibre and floral motifs, connecting us to a place or culture. In our global world this connection has been lost. Today our clothing is likely to be created using fossil fuels and toxic chemicals, damaging human health and nature’s ecosystems." We say: we love the power of plants! Find out more about the garden here. https://www.rhs.org.uk/shows-events/rhs-chelsea-flower-show/Gardens/2022/a-textile-garden-for-fashion-revolution Follow Carry on Instagram here, Lottie here, and Kate here. Don't forget to let us know what you think! As usual, further links are on www.thewardrobecrisis.com * See acast.com/privacy https://acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

50m
May 25
Power Dressing with Costume Designer Jessica Worrall

  What comes to mind when you hear the phase: power dressing? In the 1980s, it was big news in the corporate world - with woman in big-shouldered designer suits, showing the men who was boss. But using clothes to communicate your status goes back as far as fashion does. In Ancient Rome, it meant the right to wear purple. If you were a courtier at Versailles, it meant the finest brocades.  Today, you might think that if you can afford it, you can have it, but as Kim Kardashian proved at the Met Gala last week - it’s still complicated. There remain many circumstances when other people try to tell us what we can and can’t wear, and what is appropriate.  “There’s always been a way of using clothes as a powerful tool,” says this week’s guest, British costume designer Jessica Worrall. In her work costuming theatre and film productions, she uses clothes to signify what characters stand for and how they fit in to the storyline. Her latest project uses digital collage art to mash up Old Masters with high fashion runway. Have the power dynamics of fashion today changed since Elizabeth I of England’s sumptuary laws dictated how who wore what? You decide.   Check out Jessica’s work here. https://www.instagram.com/jessicaworralldigitalcollage/ Tell Clare what you think here. * See acast.com/privacy https://acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

47m
May 12
Earth Day! More Trees Please, with Dr Greg Moore

EARTH DAY is not about buying eco-friendly stuff. This year, we challenge you to put your feet in the grass or the ocean, and your credit card away (unless you’re using it to donate to an environmental charity). Let’s make Earth Day about raising our voices for better government policies to protect biodiversity and act on the climate crisis. Let’s make it about communing with the birds, insects, animals and THE TREES. Start here! Meet Dr Greg Moore - a botanist and 'PLANT MECHANIC' at the University of Melbourne with a specific interest in arboriculture. His PASSION FOR TREES is centred around understanding how they operate and cope with their environments, and appreciating the benefits trees provide in urban spaces. In this Episode, Clare and Greg take a walk in the park to talk about THE GENIUS OF TREES. And you’re invited. Find all the links and further reading in the shownotes at thewardrobecrisis.com/podcast https://open.acast.com/shows/60ee3a8f1f9831001383bf3e/episodes/thewardrobecrisis.com/podcast Tell us what you think on Instagram @thewardrobecrisis https://www.instagram.com/thewardrobecrisis/ @mrspress https://www.instagram.com/mrspress/ * See acast.com/privacy https://acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

59m
Apr 20
Money, Fashion Power and Good Clothes, Fair Pay - Ineke Zeldenrust

Fashion Revolution Week 2022 begins April 18th. This year's theme is MONEY, FASHION, POWER. Why? As Fash Rev's communications manager Ruth Macglip says in this Episode's intro: "The mainstream fashion industry is built on the exploitation of people and the planet, with wealth and power concentrated in the hands of a few. Basically, it’s time to reimagine the values at the heart of the fashion system and scrutinise what it is we’re really paying for.” You probably already know that the fashion industry has problems! Issues for garment workers range from low pay and unsafe working conditions through gender discrimination, bullying and intimidation, to a lack of social security or social safety nets when things go wrong. As they did - spectacularly - for so many during the pandemic. What’s the answer? Improve transparency and uphold rights, pay a living wage and ensure workers have a seat at the table while all this is discussed. In this enlightening conversation, Clare and her guest INEKE ZELDUNRUST, Coordinator of CLEAN CLOTHES CAMPAIGN, unpack how this might happen - and why it must. Find all the links and further reading in the shownotes at thewardrobecrisis.com/podcast https://open.acast.com/shows/60ee3a8f1f9831001383bf3e/episodes/thewardrobecrisis.com/podcast TELL US WHAT YOU THINK ON INSTAGRAM: @thewardrobecrisis https://www.instagram.com/thewardrobecrisis/ @mrspress https://www.instagram.com/mrspress/ @fashionrevolution https://www.instagram.com/fash_rev @goodclothesfairpay https://www.instagram.com/goodclothesfairpay * See acast.com/privacy https://acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

46m
Apr 13
Lessons from the Fashion History Books - Rachel Elspeth Gross's Fab Instagram Feed

WHAT CAN FASHION HISTORY TEACH US ABOUT SUSTAINABILITY? Which fashion figures tower over the history books? Who’s fame stands the test of time, and WHO GETS FORGOTTEN - and why? What can we learn from wartime rationing and the MAKE DO & MEND movement? How was life when HOME-SEWING used to be the norm rather than exception? What new materials rocked the runways in the 1960s, and did DISPOSABLE FASHION originate with a faddish paper dress? This week, we take a look at some of the sustainability angles and moral dilemmas from FASHION HISTORY’S ARCHIVES, with American FASHION HISTORIAN RACHEL ELSPETH GROSS. It’s a conversation is full of intriguing stories from fashion’s past, that might help make sense of the present – or encourage us to look at it in new ways. Find all the links and further reading in the shownotes at thewardrobecrisis.com/podcast https://open.acast.com/shows/60ee3a8f1f9831001383bf3e/episodes/thewardrobecrisis.com/podcast Tell us what you think on Instagram @thewardrobecrisis https://www.instagram.com/thewardrobecrisis/ @mrspress https://www.instagram.com/mrspress/ Find Rachel @rachel.elspeth.gross https://www.instagram.com/rachel.elspeth.gross/ * See acast.com/privacy https://acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

54m
Apr 06
Extraordinary Invention! Could Mark Herrema's Air Carbon Change the Plastics Game?

As points out, "carbon is the giver of life - your skin and hair, blood and bone, muscle and sinews all depend on carbon. Bark, leaf, root and flower; fruit and nut; pollen and nectar; bee and butterfly; Doberman and dinosaur—all incorporate essential carbon. Every cell in your body—indeed, every part of every cell—relies on a sturdy backbone of carbon." Though it's sometimes painted that way, CARBON ISN'T A MONSTER. Carbon dioxide, however, is obviously causing us serious problems. We can't keep pumping greenhouse gases into the atmosphere. Reducing emissions and switching to renewables are the obvious first ports of call. But might we also be able to rethink unwanted greenhouse gases as a feedstock - something useful that we could turn into a product? That's what this week's guest is proposing. Meet MARK HERREMA, co-founder and CEO of NEWLIGHT TECHNOLOGIES, the company behind AIR CARBON. He’s hoping this bio-based material will revolutionise the plastics industry. And Nike agrees... Find all the links and further reading in the shownotes at thewardrobecrisis.com/podcast /thewardrobecrisis.com/podcast Tell us what you think on Instagram @thewardrobecrisis @mrspress * See acast.com/privacy https://acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

52m
Mar 30
After the Flood - Zoe Gameau on Radical Hope Club

We love to talk about our 2030 goals, but climate change is not some future worry – it’s here today. It’s already bringing more frequent extreme weather events, as we’ve seen in Australia recently. In late February, early March, catastrophic floods hit northern NSW and southern Queensland, after intense rain fell over the eastern seaboard. Rivers burst their banks, sending houses, roads, farms, and public buildings underwater. People died. Communications were a struggle. It some cases, it took days for the emergency services to arrive, and people were left to fend for themselves, rescuing their neighbours in whatever floated, and organising their own-off road vehicles and even helicopters. Three weeks later, it isn’t over for the thousands of affected. Beyond the mind-boggling extent of the clean-up lies a housing crisis. But this is not a gloomy interview. Our theme is radical hope. Meet Northern Rivers local ZOE GAMEAU, who shares how her local community, and women in particular, sprang into action to help and organise on the ground. And, yes, there’s a fashion angle – clothes take on a special meaning when you’ve lost everything. * See acast.com/privacy https://acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

57m
Mar 23
How to Dress your Avatar for the Metaverse - Digital Fashion 101, with Moin Roberts-Islam

Have you bought digital garments for your avatar yet? Would you like to? You need to listen to this! Moin Roberts-Islam is the Technology Development Manager at the Fashion Innovation Agency, at the London College of Fashion, and he’s here to answer all our questions. In this riveting interview, you’re going to hear him explain pretty much every entry level thing you need to know about HOW DIGITAL FASHION WORKS, why it’s exploding, what brands are doing, how GAMING is involved, who is buying digital garments and why, plus we discuss the Metaverse and NFTs, and how all this relates to SUSTAINABILITY. @mrspress https://www.instagram.com/mrspress/ @thewardrobecrisis https://www.instagram.com/thewardrobecrisis/ www.thewardrobecrisis.com https://thewardrobecrisis.com/ * See acast.com/privacy https://acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

45m
Mar 16
Fashion's Response to War in Ukraine - A Conversation with Vogue Ukraine's Venya Brykalin

On February 24th, Russia invaded Ukraine. The news headlines filled with terrifying stories of missile strikes on residential areas, hitting apartment buildings and killing civilians; of nuclear power plants being attacked and 1 million people fleeing country. What has fashion to do with all this? The morning that Russian President Vladimir Putin declared war was also the first day of Milan Fashion Week. And as the violence continued, so too did the fashion shows, next in Paris. Fashion’s Instagram feeds were unsettling mix of commentary on Kim Kardashian’s outfits and blue-and-yellow street style looks inspired by the Ukrainian flag. Some brands used their platforms to take a stand for peace. But solidarity only goes so far. HOW SHOULD FASHION RESPOND TO WAR? What is our moral obligation? Saying you care about something is not the same as doing something about it, so beyond a social media post, how can an industry like fashion contribute meaningfully? Should brands the retailers impose their own sanctions on Russia and halt business there? What support do Ukrainian designers need? Is it okay not to speak out? And when does this become simply, as guest today puts it, common sense, or an expression of our common humanity. In this week’s Episode, Clare sits down with VENYA BRYKALIN, fashion director of Vogue Ukraine to ask these questions and more. Want to help Ukraine? Please visit this website: https://how-to-help-ukraine-now.super.site/ https://how-to-help-ukraine-now.super.site/ Thank you for listening. As usual, find further links and details on the shownotes on thewardrobecrisis.com https://thewardrobecrisis.com/podcast * See acast.com/privacy https://acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

49m
Mar 09
Akira Isogawa On Rescuing Fabric from the Trash and Why A Simple Soup Beats Truffles

What does it mean to leave - voluntarily - your homeland, to make a new creative life in another country? How might the place you left behind and the new one you chose collide in your work? Thirty-five years after he left Koyoto and enrolled in East Sydney Technical College, with a big dream and small bag full of kimonos nicked off his mum, AKIRA ISOGAWA is an Australian national treasure. He's been the subject of major museum retrospectives, designed costumes for the ballet, and seen his work worn by supermodels, and championed by Vogue editors and influential buyers. But Akira is still as humble as they come. Clare sits down with the ICONIC JAPANESE-AUSTRALIAN FASHION DESIGNER to discuss home, roots and the future, and past, of fashion. It’s a delightful conversation touching on the artist's creative journey and his collaborators, his long fascination with Japanese textiles and his approach to sustainability - which considers minimalism, recycling, repurposing and mending. @mrspress https://www.instagram.com/mrspress/ @thewardrobecrisis https://www.instagram.com/thewardrobecrisis/ www.thewardrobecrisis.com https://thewardrobecrisis.com/ * See acast.com/privacy https://acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

44m
Mar 02
Should Governments Stop Unsustainable Fashion? Maxine Bedat on New York's Fashion Act

Have you heard about New York’s proposed sustainable fashion law? It’s called the Fashion Sustainability and Social Accountability Act, and if it is passes those behind it say: this groundbreaking piece of legislation that will make New York the global leader in accountability for the $2.5 trillion fashion industry. Supporters include the likes of Stella McCartney and Jane Fonda. So, why do we need it? If New York were a country, it would rank as the world’s 10th largest economy, bigger than Canada, Russia and Korea. You already know that the global fashion industry has major climate impacts. It is responsible for around 4% of carbon emissions (some say 10%). Meanwhile, supply chains remain stubbornly opaque, garment and textile workers continue to get a raw deal and fashion waste is a major polluter. And New York, as an iconic commercial rag trade hub, has the potential to play a powerful role in transforming things. This week, Clare sits down with MAXINE BEDAT, founder of New Standard Institute, one of the driving forces behind the Act. They discuss how it came about, what it hopes to achieve and whether it's likely to fly. Maxine is sustainable fashion pioneer, formerly one half of Zady and last year she published her first book - @mrspress https://www.instagram.com/mrspress/ @thewardrobecrisis https://www.instagram.com/thewardrobecrisis/ www.thewardrobecrisis.com https://thewardrobecrisis.com/ * See acast.com/privacy https://acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

40m
Feb 23
Marvellous Magical Mara Hoffman - Fashion's Fire Sign Go-Getter

This week we sit down with NEW YORKER MARA HOFFMAN to find out how she turned her namesake brand into a SUSTAINABLE FASHION LEADER, what makes her tick - from astrology and to the inspirational beauty of Mother Earth, and being a mamma thinking about the next generation. The MH brand does a bunch of cool stuff, like working with natural dyes and regenerative agriculture projects. There’s even a peer-to-peer preloved Mara Hoffman marketplace called FULL CIRCLE. They also work with a local social enterprise called Custom Collaborative that provides jobs and training for from low-income and immigrant communities. In this warm discussion, Mara and Clare discuss why we still need physical stores and spaces to connect is in ways that aren’t quite the same online. The burden of physical stuff,  the responsibility that comes being a designer today. And plants! And SATC legend Patricia Field. Enjoy! Mara is tops. * See acast.com/privacy https://acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

49m
Feb 16
In Pursuit of Balance - Tim Jackson talks Post Growth, Life After Capitalism

Do we really believe that we can pursue infinite growth on a finite planet? Why would we even want to? This week's guest is TIM JACKSON, the ecological economist who wrote . It's a very persuasive argument for a complete rethink of how we define success, and why we need a new type of economy, one that prioritises relationships and meaning, over profits and power. Tim sees this book as "both a manifesto for system change and an invitation to rekindle a deeper conversation about the nature of the human condition.” Sound good? What that might look like practically? How could we get there? On this Episode, Tim and Clare discuss all this and more, from how advertising fuels overconsumption and why big companies are banking on green growth, to the future of work, what a single universal income could do for us, and even a bit of fashion – by way of an 18th century philosopher. Head to our website https://thewardrobecrisis.com/ for further reading and links. We hope you enjoy this thought-provoking conversation! Please consider rating and reviewing in Apple podcasts, and sharing the show with your friends. You can find us on Instagram here https://www.instagram.com/mrspress/, and here https://www.instagram.com/thewardrobecrisis/, and Clare on Twitter, here https://twitter.com/mrspress. Don't forget to hit subscribe! New Eps every Wednesday. * See acast.com/privacy https://acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

44m
Feb 09
How to Make Fashion Week Sustainable, Copenhagen Style

After two years of FASHION WEEKS globally being more or less on pandemic pause, they're back. Last week the Paris couture shows drew crowds in the French capital. As we publish, Scandinavia is in the spotlight with Copenhagen's event. The big four are going ahead this month, albeit with a few big names missing and some format changes. London's will be a gender neutral digital-physical event, showing "menswear, womenswear and gender neutral collections" - after London Fashion Week Men's was cancelled in January. New York is planning with physical shows, despite Tom Ford having to cancel due to Omicron disruptions. And while the schedules for Milan and Paris womenswear have yet to be published, they are expected to include some heavy hitters, including Gucci in Milan. So, we ask – is this the start of everything GOING BACK TO THE WAY IT USED TO BE? Why shouldn’t it be? And what is the alternative? Do need fashion weeks at all? How can we reinvent them? What role could they play in sustainability? This week's guest is CECILIE THORSMARK, CEO OF COPENHAGEN FASHION WEEK. Discover how she introduced pioneering new sustainability requirements as a condition of brands showing on the Danish runway, and what it takes to get the carbon footprint of an event like this down. * See acast.com/privacy https://acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

52m
Feb 02
Shein's Ultra Fast Fashion Model

And you thought Zara was fast fashion! Buckle up because new trends are landing daily if not hourly, as a new breed of online disruptor throws out thousands of styles a week to see what sticks. Brands like Boohoo, Pretty Little Thing and Fashion Nova are part of a new ultra-fast fashion era, but Shein is by far the biggest player. Worth a reported $47 billion, the Chinese company is now the biggest selling fast fashion brand in the US. But how does it work? What's the secret to its giant reach? And just how many items does it drop in a week? In our first episode for Series 7, host Clare Press sits down with the American journalists MEAGHAN TOBIN and LOUISE MATSAKIS who, along with Beijing-based Wency Chen, spent six months looking into this, from every possible angle. From speaking to garment workers and interviewing shoppers to tracking down one young TikTok user who saw her vintage vest morph into thousands of copies, taking her personal photo along for the ride - without her permission. Let us know what you think. Follow Clare on Instagram @mrspress https://www.instagram.com/mrspress/ @thewardrobecrisis https://www.instagram.com/thewardrobecrisis/ www.thewardrobecrisis.com https://thewardrobecrisis.com/ * See acast.com/privacy https://acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

53m
Jan 26
Fashion Act Now - Is it Time to DeFashion? (And What the Heck Does that Mean?)

YOU'VE PROBABLY HEARD ABOUT DEGROWTH, which is: "a planned reduction of energy and resource use designed to bring the economy back into balance with the living world in a way that reduces inequality and improves human well-being." (If this idea is new to you, have a listen to Episode 135 with economist Jason Hickel) https://thewardrobecrisis.com/podcast/2021/1/9/podcast-135-nina-gbor-interviews-jason-hickel-on-degrowth-amp-less-is-more?rq=jason%20hickel. Question: is it time to apply such thinking more specifically to the fashion industry? What would that look like? This week's podcast presents the ideas of a new fashion activist organisation called Fashion Act Now https://www.fashionactnow.org/ (FAN), born out of Extinction Rebellion. They are calling for "a radical defashion future" - their interpretation of: "the role fashion must play in degrowth. It is a transition to post-fashion clothing systems that are regenerative, local, fair, nurturing and sufficient for the needs of communities." They argue that the current system - which they call Fashion with a capital 'F' - is not only environmentally unsustainable because it's addicted to overproduction, but, in its current form, morally bankrupt being built on oppression. "Defashion may sound negative," says FAN co-founder and former fashion journalist BEL JACOBS, "but we think of it as a movement of joy, possibility, liberation. It does not mean the end of beautiful clothing." On this podcast, you will hear from Jacobs, along with her fellow FAN co-founder, the activist SARA ARNOLD; Extinction Rebellion co-founder (a former fashion designer herself) CLARE FARRELL; anthropologist SANDRA NIESSEN (who has researched the clothing and textile tradition of the Batak people of Sumatra, Indonesia, for almost 40 years); fashion museum curator and founder of SHONAGH MARSHALL; and New York-based stylist SAMANTHA WEIR. To take the Fashion Act Now pledge, see here. https://www.fashionactnow.org/ Follow them on Instagram here https://www.instagram.com/fashion_act_now/. THANK YOU FOR LISTENING TO WARDROBE CRISIS. Find the shownotes here. This is the final Episode of Series 6. See you in January 2022 for Series 7! Don't be a stranger - follow Clare on Instagram @mrspress https://www.instagram.com/mrspress/ @thewardrobecrisis https://www.instagram.com/thewardrobecrisis/ www.thewardrobecrisis.com https://thewardrobecrisis.com/ * See acast.com/privacy https://acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

56m
Dec 06, 2021
What's the Story with Recycled Polyester? Cyndi Rhoades from Worn Again Explains All

More than half of all the textiles use today are polyester. You will definitely have poly in your wardrobe, even if you prefer natural fibres. Synthetics are lurking everywhere, whether as polyester, nylon, or blends mixed with cotton. Poly is cheap, ubiquitous and it's not going away any time soon. It's also made from fossil fuels, doesn't biodegrade and most of it ends up as waste. Cyndi Rhoades believes recycled is the answer. A UK-based, US-raised activist turned entrepreneur, she founded Worn Again Technologies (originally called Worn Again) in 2005 - determined to make a difference and create a business out of solving the challenge of textiles ending up in landfill or incineration. Initially, she looked to upcycling. “It was really hard it make it work at scale, but also ultimately we weren’t solving the problem of textile waste," she says. "Once these second-life products were used, they would end up in landfill anyway. So we were only postponing textiles going to landfill. It made us realise that recycling at a molecular level was the solution.” From her formative days in London's early 2000s sustainable fashion scene, to living on a barge off-the-grid today, Cyndi has a long view on how this space has evolved and what's coming next. Ever wondered how virgin polyester is actually made? Did you know the recycled kind is almost always made from recycled plastic bottles, not textiles? How sustainable is it? How do we decide? It is greenwashing? Can we really make fashion circular? What would that look like? Why is it taking so damn long? This Episode is like a masterclass in material-to-material recycling. www.thewardrobecrisis.com * Seeacast.com/privacy https://acast.com/privacyfor privacy and opt-out information.

49m
Oct 16, 2021
Waste Colonialism and Dead White Man's Clothes with Liz Ricketts

Are you unwittingly contributing to waste colonialism via your wardrobe choices? What happens to our unwanted clothes when we donate them? Overproducing and underusing clothes has far-reaching consequences, as this week's guest Liz Ricketts ofThe Or Foundation https://theor.org/explains. Each week, around 15 million pieces of secondhand clothing arrive in the Kantamanto second-hand clothing market in Accra, Ghana - and 40% goes to waste. This is the story of how your old shirt or dress or pants might end up clogging drains in Accra. Or form part of a heavy rope of textiles in the ocean, or lurking under the sand like some dystopian synthetic sea monster. Or smouldering on a waste mountain in an informal dump that’s been on fire months. It doesn’t have to be this way - maybe your old clothes will get fixed up and sold on to live another life. It’s complicated, as are the solutions. What do you think? Let us know! We're on Instagram @mrspress and @thewardrobecrisis, and on Twitter @mrspress www.thewardrobecrisis.com * Seeacast.com/privacy https://acast.com/privacyfor privacy and opt-out information.

1h 4m
Sep 29, 2021
Status, Self-Obsession, Mental Health & What's Really Controlling How We Act - Will Storr

Are you a special person? How self-obsessed are we, as a society? How and why do we compare ourselves to others? What makes us group-ish? Violent? Or community minded? How about narcissistic? And is that getting worse? This week's guest is the British authorWILL STORR,who's latest book is After reading one of his previous books -Clare persuaded him to come on Wardrobe Crisis and share his ideas and research about what lies beneath our social media culture, power games, virtue signalling and obsession with getting ahead. Will is also the author of a book, TED talk and creative writing class called In this lively discussion, Will and Clare talk about everything from Ancient Greece to TIME magazine covers; the origins of the self-esteem movement to Instagram; narcissism, perfectionism, mental health and the origins of western individualism. What do you think? Let us know! We're on Instagram @mrspress and @thewardrobecrisis, and on Twitter @mrspress www.thewardrobecrisis.com   * Seeacast.com/privacy https://acast.com/privacyfor privacy and opt-out information.

41m
Sep 03, 2021
Inclusive, Purpose-Driven - the Future of Fashion According to Kenyan Designer Anyango Mpinga

Everyone's talking about climate action and social change - but Fashion is still carrying on like it's 1999. The velvet rope! Exclusivity! Snobbery and barriers to entry that lock many young designers with new ideas, out.FASHION WEEKS alone are massive carbon emitters, before we've even considered production. Pre-pandemic, theCARBON FOOTPRINT of all the media, buyers, models and designers going to the big four fashion weeks (NY, London, Milan & Paris) over a 12-month period, was enough to light up Times Square in New York for 58 years! And you're no doubt familiar with fashion's unfairness, murky supply chains andLACK OF DIVERSITY. Change is due. But the industry seems determined to get back to business as usual. This week's guest, London-basedKENYAN FASHION DESIGNER ANYANGO MPINGAhas other ideas. Digital presentations could change the game, she says. But that's just one piece of the puzzle. Fashion must find its heart again. In this inspiring conversation, Anyango and host Clare Press talk purpose, service and giving back - and how, in Anyango's case, coming from a family of strong African women has shaped her. The designer shares her advice for independents trying to beAS SUSTAINABLE AS POSSIBLE, and the broader industry that needs to do better on diversity and inclusion. Big Fashion - take notes! Go towww.thewardrobecrisis.com https://thewardrobecrisis.com/podcast/2021/8/16/ep-148-inspiring-fashion-anyango-mpingafor all the links. * Seeacast.com/privacy https://acast.com/privacyfor privacy and opt-out information.

39m
Aug 19, 2021
How Eco-Friendly is Fashion Rental, Really?

HAVE YOU HEARD THE ONE ABOUT THROWING YOUR CLOTHES AWAY BEING BETTER FOR THE PLANET THAN RENTING THEM? In this Episode, we get the real story on the study out of Finland that spawned so many clickbait headlines, then ask a British retail legend about what's driving the fashion rental boom. We hear from a purpose-driven millennial founder about what her company is doing to ensure rental really is a greener fashion option than buying new clothes; and learn the secrets of eco-friendly dry cleaning (which... is actually wet - who knew?). Featuring interviews with: Professor Jarkko Levänen of Lahti University of Technology; Jane Shepherdson, chair of My Wardrobe HQ; Victoria Prew, co-founder of HURR, and Dr Kyle Grant, founder of Oxwash. Thank you for listening to Wardrobe Crisis. Don't forget to hit subscribe! Find us at wwww.thewardrobecrisis.com & onInstagram https://www.instagram.com/mrspress/ * Seeacast.com/privacy https://acast.com/privacyfor privacy and opt-out information.

52m
Aug 12, 2021
You Need to Know These New Sustainable Fashion Designers

Who's Shaping Sustainable Fashion's Design Future? Each Wardrobe Crisis series we present a new generation talent episode, spotlightingEMERGING FASHION DESIGNERSwho are pushing sustainability forward. This time we’re talking with: a positive knitwear designer from Canada who’s ongoing collaboration with Post Carbon lab sees her creating living garments that photosynthesise as you wear them. A British fashion multi-tasker who works as a sustainable womenswear designer focused on deadstock materials, a freelance writer, model and stylist. And a community-driven womenswear designer from Brazil who is wowing with his artful, high-craft textile treatments - and challenging fashion’s obsession with youth while he’s at it. MeetOLIVIA RUBENS, JOSHUA JAMES SMALLand JOAO MARASCHIN. This Episode is guest-host -NINA VAN VOLKINBURG, fashion academic and co-founder of the Reture designer upcycling marketplace. * Seeacast.com/privacy https://acast.com/privacyfor privacy and opt-out information.

47m
Aug 05, 2021
How To Be Old with Accidental Icon's Lyn Slater

How do you feel about getting older? Maybe you’re so young it feels a world away? Or maybe you’re feeling it, and wondering where the time went? This week’s guest fashion influencerLYN SLATERhas no such worries - she reinvented her career in her 60s, going from college professor to Instagram star and being described as “one of fashion's finest-dressed people”. Since then she’s been written about a thousand times as a sort poster woman for growing older stylishly. But now, she’s examining further what it means to be old, and what we think about that word, from old people to old houses to old things. In a recent post on her blog, Accidental Icon, she wrote: “I’m going to keep saying I’m old over and over until it drains all the pejorative connotations from the word and the exuberant proclamations like, ‘60 is the new 40’ which still seems to imply younger is better.” Does old still have a stigma? How does it relate to slow, slowing down, slow fashion, appreciating things that have been around a bit. Are we on the brink of a new-old revolution? It's time to have a conversation about how to be old! Thank you for listening to Wardrobe Crisis. Find our websitehere. https://thewardrobecrisis.com/ Don't forget to subscribe! And if you listen in Apple Podcasts, please consider rating & reviewing. Love the show? Get in touch in IG@mrspress https://www.instagram.com/mrspress/&@thewardrobecrisis https://www.instagram.com/thewardrobecrisis/ * Seeacast.com/privacy https://acast.com/privacyfor privacy and opt-out information.

39m
Jul 30, 2021
The Day the World Stops Shopping - J.B. MacKinnon

“THE 21ST CENTURY HAS BROUGHT A CRITICAL DILEMMA INTO SHARP RELIEF: WE MUST STOP SHOPPING, AND YET WE CAN’T STOP SHOPPING.” - J.B MACKINNON   Have you noticed that stopping shopping is trending? It used to be a very unusual challenge to take on, but fashion detoxes are going mainstream as people begin to question hyper-consumerism and look for ways to resist it. But what would happen if weturned off the fashion tap tomorrow? And not just fashion - consumer goods in general. What if everybody stopped shopping all at once? The wheels of the economy-as-we-know-it would grind to a halt. There’d be mass unemployment, and potentially chaos, the most marginalised people would be worst affected. And what about all those small business, including the ethical and sustainable ones? What about your job?   Could we find a balance between curbing our consumerist excesses while keeping afloat? In this must-listen episode, Clare quizzes author J.B. MacKinnon about his riveting thought experiment. When he started thinking about his central dilemma - that the planet seems to need us to stop consuming so much, while the economy seems to require us to keep doing it - no one could have imagined what was around the corner. Covid made the thought experiment real... Thank you for listening to Wardrobe Crisis. Find our websitehere. https://thewardrobecrisis.com/ Don't forget to subscribe! And if you listen in Apple Podcasts, please consider rating & reviewing. Love the show? Get in touch in IG@mrspress https://www.instagram.com/mrspress/&@thewardrobecrisis https://www.instagram.com/thewardrobecrisis/ * Seeacast.com/privacy https://acast.com/privacyfor privacy and opt-out information.

49m
Jul 14, 2021
It's Amazing What She Can Do With an Old Tablecloth - Meet Menswear Maverick Emily Adams Bode

Lock up your linens!EMILY ADAMS BODEhas designs on your grandma's tablecloths. And her quilts. America's favourite emerging menswear talent made her fashion name upcycling characterfulOLD DOMESTIC TEXTILESand dustyDEADSTOCK - winning a CFDA award and a Woolmark Prize while she was at it. The result is menswear with meaning, designed to be passed down the generations. This is a lovely quirky conversation about what inspires her as aMAKER AND COLLECTOR, the joys ofUPCYCLING and the layers of meaning in hand-worked and customised clothes.  Thank you for listening to Wardrobe Crisis. Find our websitehere. https://thewardrobecrisis.com/ Don't forget to subscribe! And if you listen in Apple Podcasts, please consider rating & reviewing. Love the show? Get in touch in IG@mrspress https://www.instagram.com/mrspress/&@thewardrobecrisis https://www.instagram.com/thewardrobecrisis/ Seeomnystudio.com/listener https://omnystudio.com/listenerfor privacy information. * Seeacast.com/privacy https://acast.com/privacyfor privacy and opt-out information.

46m
Jun 30, 2021
Red Shoes! Aminata Conteh-Biger, This is What a Refugee Looks Like

Welcome back! Series 6 is here! THE TITLE OF THIS EPISODE ASKS YOU TO LEAVE YOUR PRE-CONCEPTIONS AT THE DOOR. THERE IS NO ONE WAY FOR A REFUGEE TO LOOK, SEEM, DRESS AND SHOW UP IN THE WORLD.  OnWORLD REFUGEE DAY,the UN Refugee Agency (UNHCR) asks us to honour refugees around the globe. To celebrate the strength and courage of people who have been forced to flee their home countries to escape conflict or persecution.  And so we are excited to bring you this extraordinary interview withAMINATA CONTEH-BIGER.  Aminata is an UNHCR ambassador in Australia. She's also an author, speaker and the founder of Aminata Maternal Foundation. We met when I hosted an event for her wonderful book,at an organisation in Sydney that we both support calledTHE SOCIAL OUTFIT. Like everyone who has listened to her tell story, I was deeply affected by it, but also by Aminata's spirit. She has endured some terrible things, but if I had to think of words to describe her they'd be about love, joy, generosity, fun, glamour, the sisterhood and activism. Aminata is a fabulous fashion fan, mum, women's rights and maternal health advocate, and, yes, refugee. She is the sum of her many parts - proof that we are not one story, even when that story is as big as hers. In 1999, during the civil war in Sierra Leone, the then 18-year-old Aminata was a kidnapped by rebel soldiers. She was held captive for several months, and finally freed as part of a negotiated prisoner exchange. When she fled to Australia, with UNHCR's assistance, she had no idea what it would be like. She arrived here with nothing and to had to start again. Trigger warning - this conversation includes reference to rape and details of violence. But ultimately this is an uplifting story about fleeing one home and finding another - and joy along the way.  THANKS TOSPELL, https://au.spell.co/THIS EPISODE IS PROUDLY BROUGHT TO YOU BYTHE CLIMATE COUNCIL. https://www.climatecouncil.org.au/ Seeomnystudio.com/listener https://omnystudio.com/listenerfor privacy information. * Seeacast.com/privacy https://acast.com/privacyfor privacy and opt-out information.

1h 7m
Jun 23, 2021
How To Make A Handbag the Old-Fashioned Way With Slow Fashion Craftswoman Simone Agius

While you were distracted by the latest luxury It-whatever (and the shiny, ridiculously expensive global marketing behind it) slow local fashion makers were carefully, quietly crafting their wares regardless - on a fraction of the budgets of the big fashion names. It's time to take more notice of them! Because if we don't support the independents, how will they thrive?CAN SMALL LOCAL MAKERS COMPETE WITH THE BIG GUYS TODAY, AND SHOULD THEY TRY? OR IS IT TIME TO BUILD NEW NETWORKS THAT CREATE A TOTALLY DIFFERENT PLAYING FIELD? Meet one woman going her own way - and sharing what she's learned along it. SIMONE AGIUSis the Melbourne maker behindSIMETRIE- a disruptive, hand-crafted accessories brand that's challenging norms. Thank you for listening to our "pass the podcast mic" series. We've loved making it for you. If you can help us spread the word, please do (we're indie too). A nice rate & review in Apple goes down a treat. Links and all sorts on thewardrobecrisis.com https://thewardrobecrisis.com/ Follow us on Instagramhere https://www.instagram.com/mrspress/andhere. https://www.instagram.com/thewardrobecrisis/ Seeomnystudio.com/listener https://omnystudio.com/listenerfor privacy information. * Seeacast.com/privacy https://acast.com/privacyfor privacy and opt-out information.

34m
Apr 29, 2021
Fashion Revolution Special - A Conversation About Trees with Canopy Founder Nicole Rycroft

CALLING ALL TREE-HUGGERS! Nicole Rycroft founded Canopy Planet at her kitchen table in Vancouver with a small budget and a big idea - to protect the world's precious forests. 20 years later, Canopy is one of the leading organisations fighting globally for last frontier forests and engaging business - including the fashion industry - to find alternatives to unsustainably sourced wood in their supply chains. DO WE REALLY USE ANCIENT TREES TO MAKE TRIVIAL THINGS? TRY PIZZA BOXES AND PARTY FROCKS. It's an outrage (and you'll hear Clare getting mad about it in this chat) but it's also an opportunity for change, and Canopy is doing something about it. This bonus Episode was produced in partnership with Fashion Revolution. The theme this year is Rights, Relationships and Revolution. FORESTS HAVE RIGHTS TOO! Thank you for supporting our work. If you like this Episode, please share it - we appreciate your help in spreading the word. Find the shownotes & all things Wardrobe Crisishere. https://thewardrobecrisis.com/podcast/2021/4/21/ashion-revolution-edition-canopy-founder-nicole-rycroft Seeomnystudio.com/listener https://omnystudio.com/listenerfor privacy information. * Seeacast.com/privacy https://acast.com/privacyfor privacy and opt-out information.

45m
Apr 21, 2021
Meet Ýr Jóhannsdóttir - Iceland's Most Exciting Knitwear Provocateur

How big isSUSTAINABLE FASHION IN ICELAND?You might be surprised to find out. We also nearly called this Episode:THE SECRET LIVES OF SWEATERS. Listen and you will see why! In this fascinating, surprising conversation about funny jumpers and changing the world, you will meetÝR JÓHANNSDÓTTIR- a textile designer, artist/activist upcycler fromREYKJAVIK. With her labelÝRÚRARÍ (and herhuge Instagram following https://www.instagram.com/yrurari/) she is making a name for herself using creativity and humour to challenge fashion's unsustainable ways.  People want to have fun with fashion, she says, and if we can use that to get a serious message across, that's a powerful thing. Also up for discussion: Iceland's craft and wool tradition, appreciating the local, resourcefulness, tool libraries and the future of fashion as sharing.  This is part of our "pass the podcast" mic series - the (extended) finale! Where we're telling listener stories. Love it? Please help us spread the word. If you can rate & review in Apple, we'd be grateful. Find us at thewardrobecrisis.com Follow us on Instagramhere https://www.instagram.com/mrspress/and here. Seeomnystudio.com/listener https://omnystudio.com/listenerfor privacy information. * Seeacast.com/privacy https://acast.com/privacyfor privacy and opt-out information.

31m
Apr 14, 2021
Vintage, Thrifted & Secondhand Fashion - Series 5 Finale, Listener Stories Part 1.

Vintage and second-hand fashion is in the news more than ever before. It's set to eclipse fast fashion within ten years. The designer re-commerce sector is booming. But as shopping pre-loved becomes more aspirational, are those who rely on thrifted clothes being locked out? What's not up for debate, however, is that the piles of discarded fashion and textiles keep growing. The excess is real. Where it ends up, who pays the price, what that price should be, what's selling, what's not, what should be ... in this week's episode we address all this and more as our listeners take a seat in the interviewee's chair.  Welcome to Part 1 of our #sharethepodcastmic finale, featuring vintage rental store-ownerALI DIBLEYon clothes with personalities; dedicated thrifterJULIA BROWNEon the evolution of opshopping and street style photographerLIISA JOKINENon preloved's digital revolution. Find the shownoteshere.  https://thewardrobecrisis.com/podcast/2021/2/12/podcast-138-series-5-finale-part-1-vintage-thrifted-amp-second-hand Seeomnystudio.com/listener https://omnystudio.com/listenerfor privacy information. * Seeacast.com/privacy https://acast.com/privacyfor privacy and opt-out information.

1h 4m
Mar 04, 2021