POLITICO Playbook Daily Briefing

POLITICO

About

POLITICO Playbook's must-listen briefing on what's driving the day in Washington.

Available on

Community

887 episodes

Aug. 15, 2022: Inside the White House’s plan to sell itself

President Joe Biden and his entire administration are readying for a roadshow with a simple message: We did what we said we would do. The White House, looking to capitalize on his string of policy and political wins, is launching a travel and media blitz over the next few weeks as it looks to beat the historical midterm odds in less than three months.   The details of the victory lap were outlined in a White House memo from deputy chief of staff Jen O'Malley Dillon and senior adviser Anita Dunn to chief of staff Ron Klain, exclusively obtained by Playbook.  Subscribe to the POLITICO Playbook newsletter Raghu Manavalan is the Host of POLITICO's Playbook. Jenny Ament is the Executive Producer of POLITICO Audio.

6m
Aug 15
Aug. 12, 2022: Clock ticks down on Mar-a-Lago warrant reveal

Donald Trump will not oppose the Justice Department’s motion to unseal the search warrant approved by a federal court in West Palm Beach on August 5 and a partially redacted property receipt listing the items seized during the FBI search. (The redactions, according to the government, “remove the names of law enforcement personnel who executed the search,” which seems to indicate that they do not remove any information about the items seized.) Attorney General Merrick Garland announced the government’s filing Thursday afternoon at an unusual two-minute briefing at the Department of Justice. His reason for unsealing the documents? “The department filed the motion to make public the warrant and receipt in light of the former president’s public confirmation of the search, the surrounding circumstances, and the substantial public interest in this matter.” It seems likely that Garland would not have asked the court to make the warrant and property receipt public if Trump had not gone nuclear with his accusations that the attorney general and FBI had weaponized law enforcement against him. Garland, as many observers put it, called Trump’s bluff.  Subscribe to the POLITICO Playbook newsletter Raghu Manavalan is the Host of POLITICO's Playbook. Jenny Ament is the Executive Producer of POLITICO Audio.

7m
Aug 12
Aug. 11, 2022: 'Informant' reports jolt Trump world

There are two stories worth your time this morning: one about Donald Trump in the Wall Street Journal and one about Joe Biden in the Washington Post. They intersect with each other in a way that gets to the heart of the most profound question in American politics.  First: There’s a government informant inside Trump’s inner circle. (Awake now?)  That’s the takeaway from WSJ’s Alex Leary, Aruna Viswanatha and Sadie Gurman, who retell the tale of the Mar-a-Lago records caper with important new details. Second: The second story worthy of your time is Michael Scherer, Ashley Parker and Tyler Pager’s account of recent meetings between Joe Biden and a circle of policy, political and academic experts from outside the administration. The meetings follow Biden’s promise to do more outreach — to seek “more input, more information, more constructive criticism about what I should and shouldn’t be doing,” as he put it during a news conference in January. Subscribe to the POLITICO Playbook newsletter Raghu Manavalan is the Host of POLITICO's Playbook. Jenny Ament is the Executive Producer of POLITICO Audio.

6m
Aug 11
Aug. 10, 2022: Trump lawyers provide new info but no warrant

It’s been two days since the FBI searched Trump’s Florida home, spurring loud calls for transparency at Justice. But Trump’s lawyers have the warrant and a detailed manifest of what the FBI took away. Why haven’t they been released? We asked Trump lawyer Christina Bobb, who was at Mar-a-Lago during the search, and will report back what we hear. Both Bobb and a second Trump lawyer, Lindsey Halligan, who was also present for the search, gave interviews on Tuesday and filled in some details. CBS News: “Halligan received a call at around 10 a.m. Monday that FBI agents were at Trump’s Palm Beach home, Mar-a-Lago, and they had a search warrant. She was the second Trump attorney to arrive on scene, at about 11 a.m, after the search had begun. Christina Bobb, who used to be a TV host on the far right OAN Network, was already there. “Over the next eight hours, Halligan said 30-40 FBI personnel conducted the search. There were a handful dressed in suits, but most wore t-shirts, cargo pants, masks and gloves. Halligan estimates 10-15 FBI vehicles went in and out of the property, including a Ryder truck. … Subscribe to the POLITICO Playbook newsletter Raghu Manavalan is the Host of POLITICO's Playbook. Jenny Ament is the Executive Producer of POLITICO Audio.

6m
Aug 10
Aug. 9, 2022: After the raid: GOP torches FBI, hugs Trump

The news of the FBI raid on Mar-a-Lago, the most aggressive law enforcement action ever taken against a former American president, broke last night in the most understated way imaginable. Peter Schorsch of FlordiaPolitics.com just tweeted it out: “Scoop — The Federal Bureau of Investigation @FBI today executed a search warrant at Mar-a-Lago, two sources confirm to @Fla_Pol.” (Not even an all caps “SCOOP!”) In an age where bragging about reporterial prowess is normal, Schorsch was charmingly humble: “Not sure what the search warrant was about. TBH, I’m not a strong enough reporter to hunt this down, but it’s real.” It was indeed real, as Donald Trump confirmed within the hour. “[M]y beautiful home, Mar-A-Lago in Palm Beach, Florida, is currently under siege, raided, and occupied by a large group of FBI agents,” the former president said in a lengthy statement. “They even broke into my safe!” Subscribe to the POLITICO Playbook newsletter Raghu Manavalan is the Host of POLITICO's Playbook. Jenny Ament is the Executive Producer of POLITICO Audio.

12m
Aug 09
Aug. 8, 2022: How it really happened: the Inflation Reduction Act

We know readers love tick-tocks, those now-it-can-be-told accounts of what really went on that appear soon after a bill is safely passed. This morning, there are several good ones about how the Inflation Reduction Act made it through the Senate. Today's Playbook, written edition, chopped them up, rearranged them, added our own reporting, and, in what we hope is a recurring feature, present Playbook’s master narrative of how it all went down. But two pivotal dates jump out: July 15 and July 18. Subscribe to the POLITICO Playbook newsletter Raghu Manavalan is the Host of POLITICO's Playbook. Jenny Ament is the Executive Producer of POLITICO Audio.

5m
Aug 08
Aug. 5, 2022: GOP budget nerds: here's how to kill the reconciliation bill

New Jobs Report — The July unemployment report drops at 8:30 a.m. The economy added 372,000 jobs in June, and economists are predicting a gain of 250,000 jobs for July. Yesterday, the White House called the anticipated drop an expected “transition” from “record-high-breaking jobs numbers” to “stable and steady growth.”   Sinema on Board — Sen. Kyrsten Sinema (D-Ariz.) and Majority Leader Chuck Schumer reached a deal last night to secure her vote for the reconciliation bill. In the end, she wasn’t hard to get. Democrats wanted to raise $14 billion by narrowing the carried interest loophole. Sinema wanted the provision removed. Instead, Burgess Everett and Marianne Levine report, Democrats added “a new 1 percent excise tax on stock buybacks that will bring in $73 billion, far more than the $14 billion raised by the carried interest provision, according to a Democrat familiar with the deal.” What else she got: “The deal with Sinema also adds roughly $5 billion in drought resiliency to the bill, according to another person familiar, and changes portions of the corporate minimum tax structure to remove accelerated depreciation of investments from the agreement. That depreciation-related change will cost about $40 billion. All told, the agreement with Sinema is expected to increase the bill’s original $300 billion deficit reduction figure.” Listen to Playbook Deep Dive: Biden's big bill: Two GOP strategists on how to kill it Raghu Manavalan is the Host of POLITICO's Playbook. Jenny Ament is the Executive Producer of POLITICO Audio.

5m
Aug 05
Aug. 4, 2022: Why the left is quiet about Manchin’s reconciliation deal

As the Senate moves onto the Inflation Reduction Act, bipartisanship is not in the cards. The two biggest obstacles remaining before Majority Leader Chuck Schumer can celebrate the best end of summer Labor Day party of his life are Sen. Kyrsten Sinema (D-Ariz.) and Senate Parliamentarian Elizabeth McDonough. The latest reporting suggests that Sinema is eyeing three changes: — Burgess Everett and Marianne LeVine scooped yesterday that Sinema wanted to (1) nix the carried interest loophole pay-for, which represents less than 2% of the financing for the bill, and (2) add some $5 billion in drought resiliency funding. — WaPo’s Tony Romm and Jeff Stein add that Sinema also seems to be (3) questioning the bill’s corporate minimum tax, an idea she seemed to endorse last year, though “discussions are fluid” and her “exact requests are unclear.” Bloomberg and Axios also have similar stories with an equally cloudy picture of what exactly she wants to do on the corporate minimum tax. But everyone seems to agree she’s talking to a lot of Arizona business interests about the bill’s tax provisions. Meanwhile, Caitlin Emma and Marianne Levine report that there are at least four policies in the reconciliation bill that their sources believe could be vulnerable to a Byrd Rule challenge before MacDonough, who, as Senate Parliamentarian, is the second most powerful person in Washington (after Sinema) for the next week or so. Subscribe to the POLITICO Playbook newsletter Raghu Manavalan is the Host of POLITICO's Playbook. Jenny Ament is the Executive Producer of POLITICO Audio.

4m
Aug 04
Aug. 3, 2022: Last night's biggest primary winner wasn’t a candidate

What a night. Millions of voters took to the polls yesterday, and the takeaways are many: the blocked political return of a scandal-plagued former governor, mixed results (once again) for former President Donald Trump, and primary defeats for two incumbent members of Congress seeking reelection. But the most surprising vote — and possibly most wide-reaching — wasn’t a race between two candidates; it came instead on one of the most divisive issues in American life: abortion rights.  In Kansas ... It marked the first time since the Supreme Court struck down Roe v. Wade that voters had a chance to directly weigh in on abortion rights. By a stunning, roughly 20-point margin, Kansas voters rejected a constitutional amendment that would have given state lawmakers the chance to either further restrict or ban abortions in the state. Turnout swelled — “approaching what’s typical for a fall election for governor,” per the AP — and the “no” vote did well not just in Democratic strongholds, but in conservative and rural areas, outperforming Joe Biden's 2020 vote share there.   Subscribe to the POLITICO Playbook newsletter Raghu Manavalan is the Host of POLITICO's Playbook. Jenny Ament is the Executive Producer of POLITICO Audio.

7m
Aug 03
Aug. 2, 2022: Pelosi heads to Taiwan, Erics face off in Missouri

Speaker Nancy Pelosi is scheduled to land in Taiwan today for a visit that the entire U.S. national security leadership advised her not to take.  Three developments overnight: — Asia stocks tanked: “Stocks across Asia dropped on Tuesday morning, as investors prepared for a potential economic fallout” from Pelosi’s trip, per the FT. — Chinese planes buzz median line: “China is ratcheting up military activity around Taiwan ahead of [Pelosi’s visit]. Several Chinese fighter jets flew close to the median line that divides the Taiwan Strait on Tuesday morning, according to a Taiwanese official briefed on the developments, in a reminder to Taipei that Beijing’s air force could reach the island in a matter of minutes. Military units across the People’s Liberation Army’s Southern Theatre Command, which is in charge of the South China Sea and some Taiwan-related missions, have entered a status of high alert, according to military officials in two neighbouring countries,” per the FT. — U.S. Navy deploys four warships east of Taiwan: “‘While they are able to respond to any eventuality, these are normal, routine deployments,’ [a U.S. Naval] official said, who spoke on the condition of anonymity,” reports Reuters. NYT’s Tom Friedman lays out an impassioned case against the trip: “Why Pelosi’s Visit to Taiwan Is Utterly Reckless.” His big argument, backed up with what seems like a significant scoop, is that Joe Biden has successfully restrained China from aiding Russia in its war with Ukraine, and Pelosi’s trip risks triggering confrontations with both countries: Subscribe to the POLITICO Playbook newsletter Raghu Manavalan is the Host of POLITICO's Playbook. Jenny Ament is the Executive Producer of POLITICO Audio.

13m
Aug 02
Aug. 01, 2022: Dems plow ahead on reconciliation

This week, the bill that launched a whole lot of Joe Manchin Sunday show hits will be front and center as Democrats get ready to defend the “Inflation Reduction Act of 2022” (aka the reconciliation bill) as it is parsed by the Senate parliamentarian and gets teed up for a floor vote. But there are still a couple of important hurdles left to clear. And last week, Senate Republicans blocked the passage of the PACT Act, which would expand health care access to veterans exposed to burn pits. Their opposition has spurred swift and widespread backlash. There are a number of significant races being decided this week — including some marquee primaries for Senate and House. Politico's Natalie Allison explains what you should be paying attention to in Arizona and Missouri.  Subscribe to the POLITICO Playbook newsletter Raghu Manavalan is the Host of POLITICO's Playbook. Jenny Ament is the Executive Producer of POLITICO Audio.

7m
Aug 01
July 29, 2022: White House to GOP: Why you trippin’?

It’s Day 2 of the Manchin-Schumer deal that vastly expanded Biden’s shrunken legislative ambitions, boosted the morale of Democrats in difficult races and infuriated Congressional Republicans.  The White House is ending a week they had long been dreading because of the string of bad economic data they (correctly) anticipated, on a surprisingly high note. Listen to Playbook Deep Dive: Legalizing the trip: One ‘shroom advocate’s playbook Raghu Manavalan is the Host of POLITICO's Playbook. Jenny Ament is the Executive Producer of POLITICO Audio.

10m
Jul 29
July 28, 2022: Manchin breathes new life into Biden agenda

Last summer, Sen. Joe Manchin and Senate Majority Leader Chuck Schumer signed a one-page agreement outlining the West Virginia Democrat’s red lines for a reconciliation bill. The date on that agreement? July 28, 2021. Today is July 28, 2022. One year later to the day, we’ve finally reached the moment many thought would never come: A Manchin-approved reconciliation bill — one he and Schumer brokered in secret after many thought any hope of a sweeping deal was dead — is on the Senate’s doorstep, and it includes provisions for climate change, tax hikes on corporations and health care subsidies.

7m
Jul 28
July 27, 2022: Trump's return to Washington prompts choice for GOP

When Donald Trump arrived in Washington five-plus years ago and delivered his inaugural address, he spoke of “American carnage” and used dark language (“rusted-out factories scattered like tombstones,” “disrepair and decay,” etc.) in previewing his first term as president. But that vision was positively sunny compared to the dark-as-Vantablack outlook he shared Tuesday at the America First Agenda Summit — the clearest articulation yet of his likely 2024 message. Subscribe to the POLITICO Playbook newsletter Raghu Manavalan is the Host of POLITICO's Playbook. Jenny Ament is the Executive Producer of POLITICO Audio.

5m
Jul 27
July 26, 2022: It’s Trump vs. Pence in Washington

All eyes will be on a pair of speeches today in Washington, one by the former president and one by the former vice president.  Mike Pence, whose scheduled speech yesterday at Heritage was scrapped due to travel issues, speaks at 9 a.m. at Young America's Foundation's National Conservative Student Conference. Stream it via YouTube Donald Trump speaks at 3:00 p.m. at the America First Agenda Summit. Stream it via C-SPAN Because this is Trump world, not only is there the already much-discussed drama of the Trump/Pence speech-off, but there’s new drama over Trump’s choice of venue. Former key Trump aide Peter Navarro is publicly asking Trump not to go forward with the event because he believes that the America First Policy Institute, which is hosting the summit, is insufficiently devoted to Trumpism — or at least what Navarro believes Trumpism to be in a piece headlined “Trump’s ‘Think Tank’ Prepares to Betray Him” for the MAGA-aligned online outlet American Greatness. Subscribe to the POLITICO Playbook newsletter Raghu Manavalan is the Host of POLITICO's Playbook. Jenny Ament is the Executive Producer of POLITICO Audio.

5m
Jul 26
July 25, 2022: This week, it really is the economy, stupid

If there’s one thing the White House, economists and basically everyone who thinks about money can agree on, it’s that this is going to be a big week for economic news.  — On Tuesday, we get new consumer confidence numbers, a measure which has fallen for two consecutive months. Last month’s report showed the Consumer Confidence Index at its lowest level since February 2021 and the Expectations Index — “consumers’ short-term outlook for income, business, and labor market conditions,” per the Conference Board — at its lowest level since 2013. — On Wednesday, the Fed will meet and make a decision on just how much to raise interest rates. After the most recent inflation numbers, most observers expect a hike of .75 percentage points. That would be the fourth rate increase this year. — On Thursday, the GDP numbers for the second quarter will drop, and economists expect they’ll show a decline of 1% to 2%. It would be the second straight quarter of decline — which is often seen as signaling a recession.  And Playbook's Eugene Daniels chats with POLITICO White House Bureau Chief Jonathan Lemire about his newest book, "The Big Lie." Subscribe to the POLITICO Playbook newsletter Raghu Manavalan is the Host of POLITICO's Playbook. Jenny Ament is the Executive Producer of POLITICO Audio.

12m
Jul 25
July 22, 2022: Cheney zeroes in on ‘key question’ about Trump

A year and a half later, and we are still learning new things about January 6 — and almost all of the revelations strengthen the case that the January 6 committee has been building about Donald Trump's (perhaps criminal) culpability that day. Merrick Garland  has a lot to think about after last night. Five moments will be etched in our minds from last night’s gripping primetime presentation... Listen to this week’s Playbook Deep Dive:  He was right about inflation. Biden wasn’t. Larry Summers on what’s coming next, Raghu Manavalan is the Host of POLITICO's Playbook. Jenny Ament is the Executive Producer of POLITICO Audio.

5m
Jul 22
July 21, 2022: Jan. 6 panel preps for a primetime moment of truth

President Joe Biden travels to Wilkes-Barre, Pa., this afternoon to talk about crime, and the White House is announcing a new “Safer America Plan” that details how Biden would spend a previous congressional request for $37 billion to “support law enforcement and crime prevention.”  And the eighth public hearing of the Jan. 6 committee, though likely not the last, begins tonight at 8 p.m. Eastern. It’s expected to go on for about two hours and will focus on what Donald Trump did — or refused to do — for 187 minutes at the White House after his speech at the Ellipse and before he finally asked rioters to leave the Capitol. “The story we’re going to tell,” a committee aide said, “is that in that time, President Trump refused to act to defend the Capitol as a violent mob stormed” it. Subscribe to the POLITICO Playbook newsletter Raghu Manavalan is the Host of POLITICO's Playbook. Jenny Ament is the Executive Producer of POLITICO Audio.

8m
Jul 21
July 20, 2022: Washington's attention turns to Aspen

About Last Night — “Trump wins proxy war with Hogan in Maryland primary — boosted by Democrats,” by Zach Montellaro In the Republican primary: Dan Cox, a state delegate “who has full-throatedly embraced [Donald] Trump's repeated falsehoods about fraud in the 2020 election, scored the former president a win in his fight with [Gov. Larry] Hogan,” defeating the Hogan-endorsed Kelly Schulz in the gubernatorial primary. In the Democratic primary: With mail ballots yet to be counted (Maryland state law prevents election officials from counting them until Thursday), it’s too early to call. As of this morning, author Wes Moore led the field, with former DNC Chair and Labor Secretary Tom Perez and state Comptroller ​​Peter Pranchot in striking distance.  Full results: Maryland statewide and Maryland congressional districts The View from Aspen — The place to be this week to really understand where the country is headed is 1,800 miles away from Washington: Aspen, Colorado, where Biden’s top national security officials — including his CIA director, national security adviser, and top officials from DOJ and Treasury — are gathering with a small cohort of journalists over the next four days for rare on-the-record sessions at the Aspen Security Forum. The full agenda can be found here. We asked Alex, author of POLITICO’s “National Security Daily” newsletter, to weigh in with the three big things he’ll be watching for this week. Subscribe to the POLITICO Playbook newsletter Raghu Manavalan is the Host of POLITICO's Playbook. Jenny Ament is the Executive Producer of POLITICO Audio.

10m
Jul 20
July 19, 2022: Dems’ primary-meddling strategy comes under scrutiny

Just one state holds its primaries today: Maryland. And it doesn’t lack for drama. In the gubernatorial Democratic primary, there’s a “total lack of clarity about who will be representing the party in November, after a lengthy primary distinguished by the failure of any candidate to break away from a nine-person field,” as our colleagues Brakkton Booker and Zach Montellaro write. The Republican primary is a proxy battle between moderate term-limited Gov. Larry Hogan and former President Donald Trump, who is eager to embarrass Hogan, his longtime critic. But here's what you should really watch — Maryland offers the latest example of a strategy that Dems have employed throughout the country: meddling in GOP primaries to get the general-election opponent they’d prefer, often boosting candidates further to the right who are aligned with Trump. Playbook’s video series “The Midterm View:"  Dems meddle in GOP primaries Subscribe to the POLITICO Playbook newsletter Raghu Manavalan is the Host of POLITICO's Playbook. Jenny Ament is the Executive Producer of POLITICO Audio.

5m
Jul 19
July 18, 2022: The top 3 storylines to watch this week

The week's top three storylines to watch: 1. The Jan. 6 committee’s primetime (possible) finale: The panel will hold its eighth hearing Thursday night, using an 8 p.m. slot to explore what Trump did during the 187 minutes before he told his supporters rioting at the Capitol to go home. Will this actually be the committee’s final hearing?  2. Reconciliation in the Senate: On Thursday, the Senate parliamentarian is expected to have so-called Byrd bath arguments on Democrats’ plan to allow Medicare to negotiate drug prices. 3. The CHIPS/USICA showdown: Senate Majority Leader Chuck Schumer is hoping to tee up a floor vote as soon as Tuesday “to begin the process to move forward a limited competition bill that would include — at a minimum — the emergency funding for CHIPS,” per Schumer’s office. Subscribe to the POLITICO Playbook newsletter Raghu Manavalan is the Host of POLITICO's Playbook. Jenny Ament is the Executive Producer of POLITICO Audio.

4m
Jul 18
July 15, 2022: Manchin delivers ‘crushing blow’ to Dem agenda

Late Thursday night, Sen. Joe Manchin effectively killed any chance of major climate-related provisions making their way into Democrats’ reconciliation package. The West Virginian told party leaders that “he would not support an economic package that contains new spending on climate change or includes new tax increases targeting wealthy Americans or corporations,” WaPo’s Tony Romm and Jeff Stein were first to report, “marking a massive setback for party lawmakers who had hoped to advance a central element of their agenda before the midterm elections this fall.” What else he said: “Manchin told Democratic leaders he was open to changing federal laws that might lower prescription drugs costs for seniors… And the West Virginia moderate expressed support … for extended subsidies that will help keep health insurance costs down for millions of Americans for the next two years…” Listen to Playbook Deep Dive: LA wants to recall its most progressive prosecutor. Inside the DA’s hostile office. Raghu Manavalan is the Host of POLITICO's Playbook. Jenny Ament is the Executive Producer of POLITICO Audio.

4m
Jul 15
July 14, 2022: A warm welcome abroad, but headline headaches at home

Inflation hit a 41-year high on Tuesday, as the consumer price index accelerated to 9.1% in June. More from WSJ That, in turn, affects what might be Biden’s last, best shot at a deal on reconciliation. Sen. Joe Manchin (D-W.Va.) said the new numbers make him “more cautious than I’ve ever been” in reconciliation talks, he told reporters. “Everything needs to be scrubbed, anything that can be inflationary.” AP’s Alan Fram: “It was unclear what impact Manchin’s comments would have on his closed-door talks with Schumer, which have shown progress lately. But they suggested he believed the day’s inflation report strengthened his leverage in that bargaining and, beyond that, in winning enough Democratic votes to push any agreement through the tightly divided Congress.”  Which brings us to an emerging source of anxiety for Dems in negotiations: Taxes. Democrats have long campaigned on raising tax rates on the wealthiest Americans and large corporations — and Manchin himself wants to use reconciliation to revisit the issue in the context of deficit reduction. But now, Dems are agonizing over the potential political pitfalls that come with raising taxes in an election year, as Burgess Everett and Sarah Ferris write this morning. Subscribe to the POLITICO Playbook newsletter Raghu Manavalan is the Host of POLITICO's Playbook. Jenny Ament is the Executive Producer of POLITICO Audio.

5m
Jul 14
July 13, 2022: An ‘unmistakable’ map to charges against Trump

Clip of the day — CNN’s coverage of Tuesday’s Jan. 6 committee hearing gave way to one of the more surreal exchanges we’ve seen on cable news, as Jake Tapper and former national security adviser John Bolton discussed some Jan. 6 participants’ attempts to overthrow the government: Tapper: “One doesn’t have to be brilliant to attempt a coup.” Bolton: “I disagree with that. As somebody who has helped plan coups d’etat — not here, but other places — it takes a lot of work.” About that hearing — Tuesday’s hearing was cut into two different parts: Donald Trump's call to action, and his supporters’ response.  Pieced together, they amount to this: The members of the Jan. 6 panel “are laying out an unmistakable map to a potential criminal case against the former president,” as Kyle Cheney and Nicholas Wu write. .

7m
Jul 13
July 12, 2022: Jan. 6 panel zeroes in on Trump tweet

Today at 1 p.m. Eastern, the House Jan. 6 committee “plans to make its most complex case yet,” write Nicholas Wu and Kyle Cheney: “that Donald Trump's words and actions influenced extremists and brought them to the steps of the Capitol.” Central to that case is Trump’s tweet on Dec. 19, 2020: “Big protest in D.C. on January 6th. Be there, will be wild!”  Rep. Stephanie Murphy's (D-Fla.) described that tweet as a “clarion call” to members of the far-right Proud Boys and Oath Keepers. “We’ll show you how they began to organize around that date,” she said in an interview. Doing so, Nick and Kyle write, “will require investigators to delve into the sordid world of internet extremism and specifically lay out how Trump’s words rippled through its corners.”  Subscribe to the POLITICO Playbook newsletter Raghu Manavalan is the Host of POLITICO's Playbook. Jenny Ament is the Executive Producer of POLITICO Audio.

5m
Jul 12
July 11, 2022: Trump’s lawyer is talking to the feds

Breaking — Kyle Cheney: “Former President Donald Trump’s attorney Justin Clark interviewed with federal investigators two weeks ago, the Justice Department revealed in a court filing early Monday morning, a significant development that could reverberate in multiple investigations facing Trump’s inner circle.” Siren for House Dems — “House GOP marches into deeper blue terrain as Dem prospects fade,” by Ally Mutnick and Sarah Ferris. Siren for Senate Repubs — “Candidate challenges, primary scars have GOP worried about Senate chances,” by WaPo’s Michael Scherer, Colby Itkowitz and Josh Dawsey. Siren for Biden — “Most Democrats Don’t Want Biden in 2024, New Poll Shows,” by NYT’s Shane Goldmacher. Subscribe to the POLITICO Playbook newsletter Raghu Manavalan is the Host of POLITICO's Playbook. Jenny Ament is the Executive Producer of POLITICO Audio.

5m
Jul 11
July 8, 2022: Schumer ups pressure on McConnell in USICA-reconciliation dance

Breaking Overnight — Former Japanese Prime Minister Shinzo Abe was shot and killed during a campaign speech Friday in western Japan. He was 67. And, Chuck Schumer made a couple of new moves in his effort to advance two pieces of legislation tangled in political knots. Recall that Senate Minority Leader Mitch McConnell recently tweeted, “There will be no bipartisan USICA as long as Democrats are pursuing a partisan reconciliation bill.” USICA, the United States Innovation and Competition Act, is the industrial policy legislation that would shower the semiconductor industry with $52 billion of incentives to ramp up chip-making in America. China hawks like the bill because it makes the U.S. less reliant on Chinese imports. The Biden administration hails it as a policy that will strengthen the supply chain, boost domestic manufacturing, and “help us outcompete China.” The new reconciliation bill being negotiated by Schumer and Sen. Joe Manchin (D-W.Va.), who tanked the last one in December, has been inching along. Subscribe to the POLITICO Playbook newsletter Raghu Manavalan is the Host of POLITICO's Playbook. Jenny Ament is the Executive Producer of POLITICO Audio.

7m
Jul 08
July 7, 2022: Biden critics press for more SCOTUS action

Last year, the White House convened a bipartisan commission of legal experts and academics to study the Supreme Court and make recommendations on whether (and how) to reform it. The resulting recommendations were fairly moderate in scope, focusing on matters of transparency and ethics. And in the eyes of some progressives agitating for major changes to the judiciary, one big recommendation was noticeably absent: court packing.  Now, a growing number of critics on the left say that President JOE BIDEN, who remains opposed to adding seats to the court, is — sound familiar? — failing to meet the moment and respond with the urgency it demands. (Just published: Playbook's Eugene Daniels’ new story on this topic) Subscribe to the POLITICO Playbook newsletter Raghu Manavalan is the Host of POLITICO's Playbook. Jenny Ament is the Executive Producer of POLITICO Audio.

4m
Jul 07
July 6, 2022: Dems wonder if Biden can rise to moment

Is President Joe Biden meeting the moment? That’s the question driving the political zeitgeist as some of the loudest members of the Democratic Party vent their frustrations to major news outlets. The gist of their complaints: Biden (and Democrats) need a vibe shift — fast. They want the president to reflect their anger and angst. They want him to project strength and that he has a plan for meaningful action. They want him to pick fights at the right time with the right opponents, messaging on themes that get reinforced time and again.  And they feel all of this is missing from the White House right now. Subscribe to the POLITICO Playbook newsletter Raghu Manavalan is the Host of POLITICO's Playbook. Jenny Ament is the Executive Producer of POLITICO Audio.

5m
Jul 06
July 5, 2022: Exclusive: Footage from new Jan. 6 Trump docuseries

First in Playbook — Playbook has obtained a trailer for Alex Holder's “Unprecedented,” the British filmmaker’s upcoming Discovery+ docuseries about the Trump family. The two-minute-plus trailer, which you can watch here, was included among the hours of footage that Holder turned over to the House Jan. 6 committee under subpoena. (Holder gave testimony to the committee behind closed doors on June 23.) The new video highlights Holder’s unique access to the former president and his family, and includes unseen footage of Donald Trump, Donald Trump Jr., Eric Trump, Ivanka Trump and Jared Kushner, each of whom is shown in outtakes from their sitdown interviews. Subscribe to the POLITICO Playbook newsletter Raghu Manavalan is the Host of POLITICO's Playbook. Jenny Ament is the Executive Producer of POLITICO Audio.

4m
Jul 05